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By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2000
Baltimore native Michael J. Ward has been named president of CSX Transportation Inc., which operates the largest railroad in the Eastern United States - and the primary line serving the port of Baltimore. Ward, 50, has been with the CSX Corp. subsidiary for his entire career, serving most recently as executive vice president of operations. Ward assumed that post in April after a management shake-up that coincided with the departure of Ronald J. Conway, who formerly headed CSX's railroad subsidiary.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
An advisory group that advocates for MARC riders in Maryland has called on state officials and local transit operators to plan for special rail service between Baltimore and Washington in the event the Orioles make it to the World Series. The MARC Riders Advisory Council wrote a letter Thursday to Gov. Martin O'Malley — and sent copies to the Maryland Transit Administration, railroad CSX Transportation and several Maryland legislators — calling the lack of such planning unacceptable.
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NEWS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | January 7, 1992
CSX Transportation Inc., the railroad operation arm of CSX Corp., announced today that it will transfer the last remaining 350 headquarters jobs from Baltimore to Jacksonville, Fla.The move will leave the city without a major railroad headquarters for the first time in 163 years.However, many operations that support the railroad will continue to be based in Baltimore, according to Donna Rohrer, a spokeswoman for CSX Transportation.The action is part of CSX's effort to be competitive in the 1990s, Rohrer said.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Industry growth and a tide of employee retirements in Baltimore's transportation sector will create or leave open thousands of jobs by 2020, but local job seekers aren't prepared to fill them, according to a study released Monday by the Opportunity Collaborative. Low-income residents lack the needed technical training or have criminal records that make them ineligible for the jobs, according to the study by the coalition of state agencies, local governments, universities and nonprofits tasked with plotting a course toward sustainable economic growth for the Baltimore region.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff Jon Morgan contributed to this article | January 8, 1992
The transfer by CSX Transportation Inc. of the remaining 350 headquarters jobs from Baltimore to Jacksonville, Fla., marks the end of a 164-year period during which major railroad companies called Baltimore home.The action, announced yesterday, was the latest move in the last few years by CSX Transportation to consolidate its bi-city headquarters in Jacksonville. CSX Transportation is the railroad operation arm of CSX Corp., which is based in Richmond, Va.However, many operations that support the railroad will continue to be based in Baltimore, according to Donna Rohrer, a spokeswoman for CSX Transportation.
BUSINESS
By Michelle Singletary and Michelle Singletary,Evening Sun Staff William Thompson contributed to this story | August 1, 1991
After 4 1/2 years of trying to woo business to the state, J. Randall Evans, Maryland's secretary of economic and employment development, has himself been wooed by private industry.Evans will become vice president for corridor development at CSX Transportation Inc., Robert L. Kirk, the company's president, announced yesterday.Evans, 44, said he will be responsible for developing new commuter-rail and light-rail lines for CSX. CSX Transportation and its 36,000 employees provide railroad service over an 18,800-mile network in 20 states, the District of Columbia and Ontario, Canada.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1997
CSX Transportation is putting 18 Maryland industrial and manufacturing sites on the auction block in the railroad's attempt to sell off surplus land.The sites are valued at more than $6 million, according to the Carlton Group Ltd., a New York-based firm handling the auction.The deadline for bids is Oct. 14.The properties include 13 parcels in Baltimore, two in Jessup, one in Halethorpe and one in the Cecil County community of West Leslie.The parcels range in value from $60,000 to $5 million.
BUSINESS
December 25, 1992
Brokerage firm settles registration chargesA Charlotte, N.C.-based brokerage has paid $33,000 to settle charges that it failed to register its brokers who sold stocks to Marylanders, the state's attorney general's office announced yesterday.Officials at Interstate/Johnson Lane Corp.'s headquarters were unavailable for comment yesterday. The company does not have offices in Maryland.But in a news release, the attorney general's office said the company settled allegations it broke the Maryland Securities Act by failing to register with the state 43 stockbrokers who handled Marylanders' accounts between 1988 and 1992.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2010
CSX Transportation has determined that the cause of the Aug. 5 derailment in the Howard Street Tunnel was defective track, spokesman Gary Saese said Thursday. Saese said "there's no doubt" that a broken rail caused 13 cars to jump the tracks in and near the more than 100-year-old tunnel — the site of a more serious derailment in 2001 that led to a chemical fire that disrupted downtown Baltimore for a week. The spokesman said the railroad had not determined what led to the break, but he said such damage typically is caused by an internal defect.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | August 4, 1992
Maryland Transportation Secretary O. James Lighthizer appointed a former state legislator acting director of the troubled Maryland Rail Commuter (MARC) system yesterday.William R. McCaffrey, a 58-year-old former delegate from Prince George's County, will serve in the interim post until a permanent director is appointed, Mr. Lighthizer said. Mr. McCaffrey succeeds Joseph Nessel, who has been assigned to undetermined duties at the Maryland Aviation Administration after more than a year heading the MARC system.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 29, 2014
Baltimore may lose hundreds of jobs, tens of millions of dollars in economic activity and half of the port's containerized cargo following the state's decision not to build a new rail cargo transfer facility in Morrell Park. State and port officials scrambled Friday to outline alternatives to shoring up Baltimore's place in the international shipping industry ahead of the widening of the Panama Canal and the anticipated growth in Asian container traffic on the East Coast. The rail facility was meant to bring Baltimore's limited freight capacity up to par with other East Coast ports by allowing CSX Transportation to stack truck-sized shipping containers two high on trains for more efficient transportation inland.
NEWS
August 29, 2014
While this week's decision to abandon the proposed $95 million intermodal rail facility at the Mount Clare yard in Southwest Baltimore may be regarded as a big victory for neighbors in Morrell Park and elsewhere who strongly opposed it, the decision is a genuine setback for efforts to expand business at the Port of Baltimore. Hundreds of millions of dollars have been invested in recent years to make the port more competitive and reduce shipping costs; the loss of the planned intermodal facility is likely to have the opposite effect.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2014
State officials have abandoned plans for a rail cargo facility in an economically depressed corner of West Baltimore, amid vocal opposition from residents and diminishing political will. With the state withdrawing more than $30 million in funding, the CSX Transportation facility envisioned for the city's Morrell Park neighborhood will not be built, Maryland Transportation Secretary James T. Smith said Thursday. CSX and the port of Baltimore had been counting on using the facility to help move additional cargo.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
City and CSX Transportation maintenance crews did not do a good job responding to repeated complaints from residents about street damage on the Baltimore block that collapsed in the spring, according to the city's transportation director and a report reviewing previous inspections. The city of Baltimore issued the report Sunday analyzing the April 30 collapse of a stretch of East 26th Street after massive rainfall. The report noted that neither CSX nor city maintenance crews who responded to several resident complaints about the roadway before the disaster had the expertise to identify the surface issues as symptomatic of a larger failure of the street's subsurface.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
Residents of East 26th Street in Charles Village are seeking compensation from the city and CSX Transportation for damages suffered when they were displaced from their homes by a landslide in April that sent half their block crumbling onto railroad tracks below. The residents have hired teams of attorneys at three law firms, who have asked the city and railroad operator to meet them at the negotiating table or see them in court. They contend they should have been at the negotiating table when the city and CSX hashed out an agreement to split the cost of fixing the street.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Baltimore's spending board on Wednesday approved an agreement with CSX Transportation to split the cost of a new retaining wall to replace the one that collapsed in April along East 26 t h Street in Charles Village. City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young was the lone "no" vote as the five-member Board of Estimates approved the deal. Young has said the railroad should pay the entire cost. "He is disappointed with the deal the city negotiated," Young's spokesman, Lester Davis, said.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | January 29, 1992
CSX Transportation Inc., one of the nation's largest railroads, announced yesterday that it has reached what it hopes will be a precedent-setting agreement to reduce the size of its train crews by one-third.The United Transportation Union has agreed to allow the railroad to operate trains on the 210-mile-long Georgia Road with two-member crews rather than the current three-member crews. The Georgia Road runs from Augusta, Ga., to Atlanta.Although the company operates only 10 to 12 trains a day on the route, the railroad hopes the agreement will set a pattern for other portions of the CSX system, which runs about 1,300 trains a day."
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby | January 9, 1992
CSX Corp., the descendant of the Baltimore and Ohio railroad, said yesterday that it would take a $755 million pretax write-off in the fourth quarter of 1991, sidetracking any chance the company had of posting a profit last year.The Richmond, Va.-based international transportation company said that $634 million of the total charge to earnings was related to an employee buyout program designed to cut costs and boost productivity.In the first nine months of 1991, the company had profits of $280 million.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
The city of Baltimore and CSX Transportation have agreed to split the cost of rebuilding the one-block retaining wall that collapsed along East 26th Street in Charles Village, ending months of negotiations over who was responsible and how much taxpayers would cover. City officials said Monday they expect the collapse to cost taxpayers about $7.5 million - though the total could increase as construction continues - and CSX would pay the rest. The entire project is now expected to cost about $15 million, down from an initial estimate of $18.5 million.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
A freight train struck a garbage truck Tuesday morning at the same street-level railroad crossing in Rosedale where a similar collision 15 months ago resulted in a fiery explosion. The incident could have been far worse, considering what happened last year when the train derailed and the explosion caused widespread damage throughout the nearby industrial area. The CSX Transportation train remained on the tracks this time, and no one was injured in the crash at 8:15 a.m. near 68th Street and Lake Drive.
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