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By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | September 8, 1995
Another article yesterday incorrectly reported the number of positions being lost at CSX Intermodal in Hunt Valley as a result of restructuring. The number of positions being cut at Hunt Valley is 25, part of a system-wide reduction of approximately 200.The Sun regrets the errors.CSX Intermodal will shift its headquarters from Hunt Valley to Jacksonville, Fla., next year as part of a companywide restructuring that has already meant the loss of nearly 150 positions here.In a letter to employees on Wednesday, M. McNeil Porter, the company's president, confirmed the long-anticipated shift to Jacksonville.
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NEWS
August 29, 2014
While this week's decision to abandon the proposed $95 million intermodal rail facility at the Mount Clare yard in Southwest Baltimore may be regarded as a big victory for neighbors in Morrell Park and elsewhere who strongly opposed it, the decision is a genuine setback for efforts to expand business at the Port of Baltimore. Hundreds of millions of dollars have been invested in recent years to make the port more competitive and reduce shipping costs; the loss of the planned intermodal facility is likely to have the opposite effect.
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BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | July 26, 1991
CSX Intermodal, a Hunt Valley-based container transport company, has agreed to give 11 women a total of $57,000 in back pay because they were paid less than the company-set minimum salary for their jobs.The settlement is the company's second back-pay reimbursement agreement in eight months.Dan Murphy, a CSX Intermodal spokesman, said yesterday that the company used to hire people it considered to be unqualified for certain jobs, pay them less than the minimum for a year so they could be trained, then give them a raise.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | September 22, 1995
When CSX Corp. Chairman John W. Snow and Gov. Parris N. Glendening lunch at the Mansion today, they'll confront at least one issue that highlights the underlying tension between the port and the state's largest railroad.Faced with constant competition from other East Coast ports, state officials want the ability to stack 9-foot, 6-inch high containers, two-high on trains after they're unloaded from ships. But the price tag for raising railroad tunnels to accommodate the larger, double-stacked boxes is estimated at $40 million.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | July 26, 1995
CSX Intermodal plans to lay off an undisclosed number of workers at its Hunt Valley offices next week as part of a restructuring that could include shifting its corporate headquarters from the Baltimore area to Jacksonville, Fla., next year.Dan Murphy, a company spokesman, said yesterday that no final details have been worked out. But he said the layoffs are part of a companywide work force reduction of 12 percent, prompted by a recent drop in trailer shipments for the company that moves domestic and international freight.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | July 22, 1991
There's an old joke about the neophyte manager who, when told by his boss that the company was losing money on every sale, replied reassuringly, "That's OK. We'll make it up on volume."But executives of CSX Corp., parent of one of the nation's biggest railroads, weren't laughing when they discovered several years ago that the railroad's intermodal business had been run that way.Intermodal operations, which compete with trucks for cargo that can move in trailers or marine containers, were thought to be generating about $20 million in profits annually.
NEWS
September 9, 1995
Another article yesterday incorrectly reported the number of positions being lost at CSX Intermodal in Hunt Valley as a result of restructuring. The number of positions being cut at Hunt Valley is 25, part of a system-wide reduction of approximately 200.The Sun regrets the errors.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | November 20, 1991
CSX Intermodal and the Maryland Port Administration are trying to negotiate an agreement that would triple the number of trains using the port of Baltimore's Seagirt rail yard beginning early next year.CSX Intermodal Vice President Clarence W. Gooden said yesterday that the two sides have been negotiating and expect to meet on the issue again today. He said he doubted an agreement would be reached immediately.CSX would like to close its Potomac Yard in Alexandria, Va., and run the two daily trains that now originate there out of Baltimore instead.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | June 2, 1995
H. Lee Vanderpool, a CSX Intermodal executive, died Saturday of cancer at Howard County General Hospital in Columbia. The Westminster resident was 48.Since 1991, Mr. Vanderpool had been director of international sales for the Hunt Valley-based subsidiary of CSX Corp.CSX Intermodal offers shippers a rail-truck-ship connection for the movement of cargoes from the Port of Baltimore."He had the unique ability to give more of himself than he took from others," said M. McNeil Porter, president and chief executive officer of CSX Intermodal.
BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Evening Sun Staff | November 20, 1991
CSX Intermodal plans to close its rail yard in Alexandria, Va., and transfer its business to the state rail yard beside the Seagirt Marine Terminal in Baltimore.Maryland Port Administration officials say the move would cut trucking costs for the port's customers, add work for longshoremen who load and unload the trains, and increase revenues for the MPA, which gets a share of each load placed on the trains.Clarence W. Gooden, vice president and general manager of operations at CSX Intermodal in Hunt Valley, says he has meeting with MPA officials today to discuss details of the arrangement.
NEWS
September 9, 1995
Another article yesterday incorrectly reported the number of positions being lost at CSX Intermodal in Hunt Valley as a result of restructuring. The number of positions being cut at Hunt Valley is 25, part of a system-wide reduction of approximately 200.The Sun regrets the errors.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | September 8, 1995
Another article yesterday incorrectly reported the number of positions being lost at CSX Intermodal in Hunt Valley as a result of restructuring. The number of positions being cut at Hunt Valley is 25, part of a system-wide reduction of approximately 200.The Sun regrets the errors.CSX Intermodal will shift its headquarters from Hunt Valley to Jacksonville, Fla., next year as part of a companywide restructuring that has already meant the loss of nearly 150 positions here.In a letter to employees on Wednesday, M. McNeil Porter, the company's president, confirmed the long-anticipated shift to Jacksonville.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | July 26, 1995
CSX Intermodal plans to lay off an undisclosed number of workers at its Hunt Valley offices next week as part of a restructuring that could include shifting its corporate headquarters from the Baltimore area to Jacksonville, Fla., next year.Dan Murphy, a company spokesman, said yesterday that no final details have been worked out. But he said the layoffs are part of a companywide work force reduction of 12 percent, prompted by a recent drop in trailer shipments for the company that moves domestic and international freight.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Sun Staff Writer | June 2, 1995
H. Lee Vanderpool, a CSX Intermodal executive, died Saturday of cancer at Howard County General Hospital in Columbia. The Westminster resident was 48.Since 1991, Mr. Vanderpool had been director of international sales for the Hunt Valley-based subsidiary of CSX Corp.CSX Intermodal offers shippers a rail-truck-ship connection for the movement of cargoes from the Port of Baltimore."He had the unique ability to give more of himself than he took from others," said M. McNeil Porter, president and chief executive officer of CSX Intermodal.
NEWS
By Holton F. Brown | October 28, 1994
PORTS OF CALL:PortFest '94 is the big deal all around the Inner Harbor this weekend, meaning you'll be able to visit many parts of the working port that normally are closed to the public.This widespread, diverse, promotional event by various harbor organizations will showcase the port from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. tomorrow and 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday.You can park near any attraction and then travel all over the place via PortFest buses courtesy of the Mass Transit Administration. Look for literature about the possibilities and the buses at many locations around the harbor.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane and Gregory P. Kane,Staff Writer | October 22, 1993
The Port of Baltimore will open its gates to the public this weekend, offering a rare behind-the-scenes peek at shipping and industrial operations that play a major role in Maryland's economy.As part of the Portfest celebration, visitors will be shuttled free by bus and tour boat around and across the harbor -- from the Fells Point site of the port's Colonial origins to the Dundalk Marine Terminal, where huge cranes lift cargo off containerships."The purpose of Portfest is to give people a behind-the-scenes look at the world of the port and waterfront community that they wouldn't be able to see normally," said Mary Sue McCarthy, executive director of Baltimore Operation Sail, which conceived the idea.
BUSINESS
January 28, 1991
North Arundel Hospital combined its external health care businesses and formed the North Arundel Hospital Professional Center in the Pyramid Building at 1406 Crain Highway South in Glen Burnie.PHH US Mortgage Corp. in Hunt Valley is providing mortgage services to the 6,300 member banks of the Independent Bankers Association of America. The program will be administered through IBAA Mortgage Corp.Maryland Higher Education Commission is sponsoring a photography contest for amateur photographers enrolled in a Maryland community college.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane and Gregory P. Kane,Staff Writer | October 22, 1993
The Port of Baltimore will open its gates to the public this weekend, offering a rare behind-the-scenes peek at shipping and industrial operations that play a major role in Maryland's economy.As part of the Portfest celebration, visitors will be shuttled free by bus and tour boat around and across the harbor -- from the Fells Point site of the port's Colonial origins to the Dundalk Marine Terminal, where huge cranes lift cargo off containerships."The purpose of Portfest is to give people a behind-the-scenes look at the world of the port and waterfront community that they wouldn't be able to see normally," said Mary Sue McCarthy, executive director of Baltimore Operation Sail, which conceived the idea.
BUSINESS
August 24, 1992
* Sea-Land Service Inc. relocated to 2310 Broening Highway, Maritime Center II-Suite 150, Baltimore.* Maleson Advertising Inc., a Baltimore-based advertising and marketing agency, changed its name to Maleson-Naylor as a result of the appointment of James Naylor Jr. to president/chief operating officer.* Trillium, a women's clothing boutique at Greenspring Station in Baltimore, was acquired by Sima Blum.* McLean, Koehler, Sparks & Hammond, a public accounting and business consulting firm, relocated one of its Rockville offices to 200A Monroe St., Suite 225.* SFA Inc., a research and development firm in Landover, acquired some assets and liabilities of Frederick Electronics Corp.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | November 20, 1991
CSX Intermodal and the Maryland Port Administration are trying to negotiate an agreement that would triple the number of trains using the port of Baltimore's Seagirt rail yard beginning early next year.CSX Intermodal Vice President Clarence W. Gooden said yesterday that the two sides have been negotiating and expect to meet on the issue again today. He said he doubted an agreement would be reached immediately.CSX would like to close its Potomac Yard in Alexandria, Va., and run the two daily trains that now originate there out of Baltimore instead.
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