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NEWS
December 30, 2009
CSX Corp. says it is investigating whether any of its trains hit a 12-year-old Cumberland boy who was seriously hurt while allegedly cutting across the company's property. The boy was being treated Tuesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital for injuries he suffered Monday night. His name and condition haven't been released. CSX spokesman Gary Sease says the Jacksonville, Fla.-based company is getting a full accounting of all the trains that moved through the area. Cumberland police say the boy was hit by a train about 8:30 p.m. His friends told police he had sneaked through a hole in a fence and tried to beat a train across one of multiple sets of tracks.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Rebecca Ruggles | September 17, 2014
The shelving of a plan to build a new CSX rail facility in the West Baltimore residential neighborhood of Morrell Park was decried recently as a setback for regional job growth and a sign of failed leadership by CSX. But articles in The Baltimore Sun and the Baltimore Business Journal omitted mention of the successful leadership of health advocates and community members who insisted that specific health consequences of the planned facility be addressed....
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NEWS
September 4, 2014
Your recent editorial blindly waved the "save the port" flag in favor of the CSX intermodal ( "Port suffers a setback," Aug. 29). However, double-stacking containers from the port was never the main purpose of the CSX intermodal. If it were, there wouldn't be hundreds of trucks a day projected to leave the intermodal. Instead, CSX is looking for a location to take trains from all over the country and put the containers on trucks to go to local businesses like Home Depot or Wal-Mart.
NEWS
September 4, 2014
Your recent editorial blindly waved the "save the port" flag in favor of the CSX intermodal ( "Port suffers a setback," Aug. 29). However, double-stacking containers from the port was never the main purpose of the CSX intermodal. If it were, there wouldn't be hundreds of trucks a day projected to leave the intermodal. Instead, CSX is looking for a location to take trains from all over the country and put the containers on trucks to go to local businesses like Home Depot or Wal-Mart.
NEWS
December 29, 2011
The negative impact on residential neighborhoods must be considered when CSX decides on the location of its intermodal facility, which is essentially a freight yard. It's obvious that proximity to the freight yard is directly correlated with negative impacts. There are nearly 1,000 residences within half a mile of three sites being considered, along with four public schools. CSX and the government officials involved need to be fair when considering sites for the freight yard, and its negative impact on residential neighborhoods should be a key component of the decision process.
EXPLORE
March 5, 2012
It is incredibly frustrating, not only to myself but to many residents of the Elkridge/Hanover area, that CSX claims to elicit public involvement in the site selection process (for a new railway facility) yet continues to refuse to release details on how they arrived at their cost estimates for each of the proposed sites. Cost estimates for the proposed sites are not the only concern surrounding this issue but, in my opinion, CSX is being brazenly deceptive at this early stage of the process and I have a deep concern that CSX will continue to operate as such, if not more so, as the process continues.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
George J. Voith, a retired CSX executive and noted rail and streetcar photographer who was a founding member of the Baltimore Streetcar Museum, died Monday of dementia at his Northwood home. He was 87. "George is one of the last of the original guys who founded the Baltimore Streetcar Museum. He was a wonderful fellow," said John O'Neil Jr., museum president. "I first met him when I joined the museum in 1971. He was a good mentor for young members, whom he took under his wing and he urged to take on more responsibilities," said Mr. O'Neil.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2012
The derailment that killed two young women in Ellicott City Tuesday morning adds one more incident to a long history of CSX trains leaving the tracks in Maryland - from little-remembered events in the company's own railyards to the spectacular fire in the Howard Street Tunnel in 2001. It could be months before federal investigators determine the cause of the bizarre tragedy that occurred overnight in the historic Howard County mill town. The facts that emerged Tuesday suggested the fatalities were largely the result of trespassing on the tracks.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
City officials and representatives of CSX met Sunday with Charles Village residents displaced by last week's landslide, updating efforts aimed at getting them back into their homes. "I was very pleased with the mayor's presence today," said Mark Truelove, one of the residents of the first block of E. 26th Street displaced by the collapse of a 120-year-old retaining wall. He said he was less reassured by CSX officials, whom he said "had a few things to say about the specific problem they're dealing with here, rather than a long-term solution.
EXPLORE
December 12, 2011
I find it unconscionable that our esteemed members of the "fourth estate" employed by Patuxent Publishing have been relatively biased in their reporting on the siting of the proposed CSX intermodal site in Maryland. Not once have your reporters done any obvious investigative work to confirm what residents suspect: that CSX has been less than transparent in its disclosures to the general public. Whenever anyone asks CSX (and the Maryland Department of Transportation to a lesser degree)
NEWS
September 2, 2014
The decision by the state to eliminate funding for the proposed rail cargo transfer facility in Morrell Park is patently absurd ( "State pulls $30 million from rail facility project in major victory for community activists," Aug. 28). Over the recent past we have seen many businesses consolidate and move their headquarters out of the Baltimore area. One the few assets that Baltimore has that can't be moved is the port. But it seems that the powers that manage the state and city are in the process of diminishing the value of the port to the businesses that utilize it. While it's popular to blame the railroad, the fact is that the railroad must operate, within the law, in a manner to maximize profits for its shareholders.
NEWS
August 29, 2014
While this week's decision to abandon the proposed $95 million intermodal rail facility at the Mount Clare yard in Southwest Baltimore may be regarded as a big victory for neighbors in Morrell Park and elsewhere who strongly opposed it, the decision is a genuine setback for efforts to expand business at the Port of Baltimore. Hundreds of millions of dollars have been invested in recent years to make the port more competitive and reduce shipping costs; the loss of the planned intermodal facility is likely to have the opposite effect.
NEWS
August 28, 2014
I live a short distance away from Wabash Discount Liquors in Baltimore's Ashburton neighborhood. If you drive down Sequoia Street to Wabash Avenue heading toward Liberty Heights Avenue you can see and feel a large and very visible dip in the road. The dip is inverted, which leads me to think that the ground underneath is corroded and sinking in. And similar to the street collapse on East 26th Street, the road runs parallel to both the MTA and CSX tracks. My house and the whole neighborhood rumble when the CSX trains go by. Is that a coincidence or is it related to the dip on Wabash Avenue?
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2014
Baltimore's spending board on Wednesday approved an agreement with CSX Transportation to split the cost of a new retaining wall to replace the one that collapsed in April along East 26 t h Street in Charles Village. City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young was the lone "no" vote as the five-member Board of Estimates approved the deal. Young has said the railroad should pay the entire cost. "He is disappointed with the deal the city negotiated," Young's spokesman, Lester Davis, said.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
The city of Baltimore and CSX Transportation have agreed to split the cost of rebuilding the one-block retaining wall that collapsed along East 26th Street in Charles Village, ending months of negotiations over who was responsible and how much taxpayers would cover. City officials said Monday they expect the collapse to cost taxpayers about $7.5 million - though the total could increase as construction continues - and CSX would pay the rest. The entire project is now expected to cost about $15 million, down from an initial estimate of $18.5 million.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
The Baltimore Board of Estimates on Wednesday approved a nearly $12 million contract for construction and repair work to replace a block of East 26th Street that collapsed amid heavy rains in Charles Village in April. The contract covers a substantial portion, but not all, of the costs associated with the bizarre incident. The collapse occurred after a stone retaining wall holding the block of East 26th Street between North Charles and Saint Paul streets above a cut of parallel CSX Transportation railroad tracks gave out, sending half the block and more than a half-dozen parked vehicles down into the tracks.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2012
Elkridge residents are turning to lawmakers from Howard County for help fighting the potential placement of a CSX rail transfer facility in their community, arguing that lower costs should not be the only factor considered. The site in Elkridge is the cheapest of four potential locations, and the only one estimated to stay within the original $150 million cost estimate — which CSX and the state had agreed to split equally. But Elkridge residents say the project would devastate the property values of the 353 homes that lie within a quarter-mile of the facility.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
Two major Eastern railroads have filed lawsuits against the Maryland Department of Environment to block it from disclosing their shipments of crude oil through the state, according to court records. Norfolk Southern Railway and CSX Transportation claim the release of the information would pose a security threat and compromise commercially sensitive information, according to complaints filed in Baltimore Circuit Court. The federal government began requiring railroads in May to report all shipments of more than one million gallons of Bakken crude oil to emergency officials in the states the shipments pass through, following several rail accidents involving the volatile fuel.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
The parents of two young women killed in a 2012 coal train derailment in Ellicott City criticized CSX Transportation for the first time Tuesday — blaming the railroad for their daughters' deaths. "The families and our attorneys are determined to hold CSX fully accountable," said Eric Nass, father of 19-year-old Elizabeth Nass, in a statement released by the law firm Baum Hedlund Aristei & Goldman, which specializes in rail disaster litigation nationwide. "Our daughters did not cause the derailment, CSX did," said Sue Nass, Elizabeth's mother, in the statement.
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