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NEWS
December 7, 1994
The East-West disputes erupting at the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE) in Budapest provide the best justification yet for having the CSCE. If those disputes exist, they cry out for a forum in which to be addressed.CSCE was born in 1975, proposed by the Soviet Union to get the West to ratify the borders of sovereignty and hegemony in Eastern Europe. The West saw it as a way to pry the lid off human rights abuses in Communist countries. That seems so long ago. Now CSCE is a large tent for all the European countries (plus the U.S.)
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NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | December 8, 1994
Paris -- This week's meeting in Budapest of the CSCE organization -- incorporating all of the governments concerned with European security -- takes place in the midst of tension over the Bosnia crisis and inter-allied conflict over NATO's expansion and the alliance's future role in Europe.One would think CSCE complementary to NATO rather than rival. Its purpose is to assure a dialogue between Russia and the other former Soviet countries and the nations of the Western alliance. It was created in the course of the Cold War's winding down, an element in the detente that broke out when Mikhail Gorbachev launched his reforms of the Soviet system.
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NEWS
By DAVID SHORR | December 27, 1992
In the councils of the international community, the oft-repeated lesson of the Yugoslav war is that would-be mediators should get involved early.The embarrassment felt by political leaders is finally leading them to try to do just that. In various hot spots in the former Soviet Union, the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE), the lead international body for such matters, is dispatching diplomats to negotiate political settlements with the disputing parties.Serbs and Croats in Bosnia seem committed to waging war. But for other regions the time is ripe.
NEWS
December 7, 1994
The East-West disputes erupting at the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE) in Budapest provide the best justification yet for having the CSCE. If those disputes exist, they cry out for a forum in which to be addressed.CSCE was born in 1975, proposed by the Soviet Union to get the West to ratify the borders of sovereignty and hegemony in Eastern Europe. The West saw it as a way to pry the lid off human rights abuses in Communist countries. That seems so long ago. Now CSCE is a large tent for all the European countries (plus the U.S.)
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | May 13, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The United States, following the European Community, recalled its ambassador from Belgrade yesterday in light of Serbian aggression against Bosnia-Herzegovina, the State Department announced.The action, part of an escalating campaign to isolate Serbia, coincided with a move by the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE) to block Serbian participation, at least until June 30, in any CSCE decision involving what was formerly Yugoslavia.Both steps were compromises.
NEWS
February 13, 1992
As good a claim as any to a share of the credit for the explosion of freedom that shattered the Soviet empire and ended the Cold War belongs to an anomaly called the CSCE, standing for Conference on Security and Co-operation in Europe. It is not an organization, like NATO or the European Community, for it has no headquarters or staff. Its actions are not treaties or regulations, or even decisions, for their only effect is moral suasion. It is something like a floating poker game, for there is a certain amount of bluffing and calling, raising and folding, but the game is diplomacy and the chips are a series of prolix reports with names like the Helsinki Final Act and the Copenhagen Document.
NEWS
November 18, 1990
Europe's yearning for a degree unity that leaves room for all the rich splendors of its linguistic, cultural and intellectual diversity is as old as the millennium. Charlemagne's vision in fractured form has endured, often painfully, during a thousand years of European civil wars. Now, at last, it may be reaching some kind of fruition in the 34-nation summit convening in Paris this weekend.The dramas associated with Vienna in 1815 and Versailles in 1919 are strangely absent from this assemblage under the stultifying name of the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 9, 1992
MUNICH, Germany -- France and other members of the European Community said yesterday that they intended to organize military escorts for overland relief convoys in war-torn Bosnia -- a decision that could put Europe in command of any military effort there.French President Francois Mitterrand told reporters here on the final day of the annual summit of economic powers that the Western European Union (WEU), the EC's defense arm, intended to have a concrete plan for protecting the convoys ready tomorrow.
NEWS
June 29, 1991
In respite, Yugoslavia's cooler heads (if any) have a chance to prevail. Now that the federal army has proclaimed victory and a cease-fire in its two-day war with secessionist Slovenia, the federal presidency can seek compromise.But Yugoslavia's European neighbors should not leave that to chance and Yugoslav passions. They are right to pursue the opportunity for good works provided by the recently strengthened Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE).Austria and Italy invoked use of the Conflict Prevention Center in Vienna, set up by the CSCE summit last November.
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Paris Bureau of The Sun | November 18, 1990
PARIS -- Thirty-four nations, including the United States, Canada and all the countries of Europe except Albania, will formally declare the Cold War dead and herald a new age of East-West relations free of superpower rivalry here tomorrow.The Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe will open its historic meeting shortly after the erstwhile enemies of the Warsaw Pact and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization sign a landmark treaty reducing conventional forces in Europe.The accord limiting the deployment of weapons from the Atlantic Ocean to the Ural Mountains will be the only legally binding document produced during the three days of high-sounding declarations, dinners, bilateral meetings and corridor consultations here.
NEWS
By DAVID SHORR | December 27, 1992
In the councils of the international community, the oft-repeated lesson of the Yugoslav war is that would-be mediators should get involved early.The embarrassment felt by political leaders is finally leading them to try to do just that. In various hot spots in the former Soviet Union, the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE), the lead international body for such matters, is dispatching diplomats to negotiate political settlements with the disputing parties.Serbs and Croats in Bosnia seem committed to waging war. But for other regions the time is ripe.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | July 9, 1992
MUNICH, Germany -- France and other members of the European Community said yesterday that they intended to organize military escorts for overland relief convoys in war-torn Bosnia -- a decision that could put Europe in command of any military effort there.French President Francois Mitterrand told reporters here on the final day of the annual summit of economic powers that the Western European Union (WEU), the EC's defense arm, intended to have a concrete plan for protecting the convoys ready tomorrow.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau | May 13, 1992
WASHINGTON -- The United States, following the European Community, recalled its ambassador from Belgrade yesterday in light of Serbian aggression against Bosnia-Herzegovina, the State Department announced.The action, part of an escalating campaign to isolate Serbia, coincided with a move by the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE) to block Serbian participation, at least until June 30, in any CSCE decision involving what was formerly Yugoslavia.Both steps were compromises.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | April 23, 1992
Paris -- The present Serbian government's program to make a ''greater'' Serbia, incorporating large parts of Bosnia-Herzegovina as well as of Croatia, seems on its way to success. There is no one to stop it.The Serbian-dominated ex-federal army is the principal military force in the region, possessing heavy weapons. The newly arrived U.N. peacekeeping force and the European Community's observers are being brushed aside. Neither have the means nor the mission to fight Serbia.The Serbs' reward will be a big and economically crippled Serbian-Montenegrin union, facing the prospect of insurrection by the 1.2 million Albanians of Kosovo, whom the Serb authorities now dominate and oppress.
NEWS
February 13, 1992
As good a claim as any to a share of the credit for the explosion of freedom that shattered the Soviet empire and ended the Cold War belongs to an anomaly called the CSCE, standing for Conference on Security and Co-operation in Europe. It is not an organization, like NATO or the European Community, for it has no headquarters or staff. Its actions are not treaties or regulations, or even decisions, for their only effect is moral suasion. It is something like a floating poker game, for there is a certain amount of bluffing and calling, raising and folding, but the game is diplomacy and the chips are a series of prolix reports with names like the Helsinki Final Act and the Copenhagen Document.
NEWS
June 29, 1991
In respite, Yugoslavia's cooler heads (if any) have a chance to prevail. Now that the federal army has proclaimed victory and a cease-fire in its two-day war with secessionist Slovenia, the federal presidency can seek compromise.But Yugoslavia's European neighbors should not leave that to chance and Yugoslav passions. They are right to pursue the opportunity for good works provided by the recently strengthened Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE).Austria and Italy invoked use of the Conflict Prevention Center in Vienna, set up by the CSCE summit last November.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | December 8, 1994
Paris -- This week's meeting in Budapest of the CSCE organization -- incorporating all of the governments concerned with European security -- takes place in the midst of tension over the Bosnia crisis and inter-allied conflict over NATO's expansion and the alliance's future role in Europe.One would think CSCE complementary to NATO rather than rival. Its purpose is to assure a dialogue between Russia and the other former Soviet countries and the nations of the Western alliance. It was created in the course of the Cold War's winding down, an element in the detente that broke out when Mikhail Gorbachev launched his reforms of the Soviet system.
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Paris Bureau of The Sun | November 20, 1990
PARIS -- Leaders of the Warsaw Pact and NATO put their signatures on a landmark treaty here yesterday, slashing conventional weapons and sealing the end of Europe's post-war division into superpower blocs that once threatened to annihilate each other.The treaty on Conventional Forces in Europe, signed five years to the day after President Ronald Reagan met Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev at their initial summit, will lead to the destruction of a quarter- million pieces of military hardware in bringing the states of the Warsaw Pact and North Atlantic Treaty Organization down to equal levels of weapons.
NEWS
By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Paris Bureau of The Sun | November 20, 1990
PARIS -- Leaders of the Warsaw Pact and NATO put their signatures on a landmark treaty here yesterday, slashing conventional weapons and sealing the end of Europe's post-war division into superpower blocs that once threatened to annihilate each other.The treaty on Conventional Forces in Europe, signed five years to the day after President Ronald Reagan met Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev at their initial summit, will lead to the destruction of a quarter- million pieces of military hardware in bringing the states of the Warsaw Pact and North Atlantic Treaty Organization down to equal levels of weapons.
NEWS
November 18, 1990
Europe's yearning for a degree unity that leaves room for all the rich splendors of its linguistic, cultural and intellectual diversity is as old as the millennium. Charlemagne's vision in fractured form has endured, often painfully, during a thousand years of European civil wars. Now, at last, it may be reaching some kind of fruition in the 34-nation summit convening in Paris this weekend.The dramas associated with Vienna in 1815 and Versailles in 1919 are strangely absent from this assemblage under the stultifying name of the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe.
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