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By Annie Linskey | August 19, 2004
National Security Agency's Cryptologic Museum Where: There is no address. Really. But the NSA Web site does provide directions: From Baltimore, take 295 South or Interstate 95 South to Route 32 East toward Fort Meade. Move to left lane and exit onto Canine Road. Turn left at the light onto Colony Seven Road. Follow past the aircraft and Shell station into the museum parking lot. For more directions and a map, visit the Web site (see below). When: 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays-Fridays; 10 a.m.-2 p.m. every first and third Saturday.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | November 14, 2010
As recently as the late 1960s, the very existence of the National Security Agency — the Fort Meade-based defense organization that gathers intelligence from foreign countries — was such a closely held secret that insiders jokingly called the place "No Such Agency. " So when a New York newspaper reporter named David Kahn stood ready to illuminate it in a big new book in 1967, the government was less than pleased. "According to my editor [at Macmillan Publishers], the NSA director flew up to New York to say it would be dangerous to national security, and unpatriotic, to publish it," says Kahn of his book "The Codebreakers," the 1,200-page blockbuster that would establish him as the world's leading expert on the history of cryptology, the art and science of making and breaking codes.
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NEWS
By SIOBHAN GORMAN and SIOBHAN GORMAN,SUN REPORTER | February 26, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Two technology programs at the heart of the National Security Agency's drive to combat 21st-century threats are stumbling badly, hampering the agency's ability to fight terrorism and other emerging threats, current and former government officials say. One is Cryptologic Mission Management, a computer software program with an estimated cost of $300 million that was designed to help the NSA track the implementation of new projects but is...
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,david.wood@baltsun.com | November 30, 2008
OUTSIDE FORT MEADE - God bless 'em, but the nation's secret code-breakers and eavesdroppers aren't exactly the most sociable folks you'll ever meet. Many of them are hidden away here, behind the National Security Agency's bunkered fortifications, which are so foreboding they'd make Dick Cheney's eyes glisten with envy. Others work in uniform on dusty battlefields in Iraq and Afghanistan, and man austere listening posts across the Middle East and Asia. They are descendants of an early generation of code-breakers recruited on the eve of World War II, a group of Navy women who were told if they breathed a word to civilians about their work, they'd be shot.
NEWS
September 14, 2003
Interactive language exhibit to begin tomorrow at NSA The National Security Agency is unveiling an exhibit tomorrow at its National Cryptologic Museum that chronicles the evolution of languages and the importance of language analysis in intelligence gathering. The exhibit explains the process used by language analysts, and kiosks will allow visitors to experience the challenges of working with foreign languages. The exhibit also includes a replica of the Rosetta Stone. The National Cryptologic Museum opened at Fort Meade in Anne Arundel County in December 1993.
NEWS
February 11, 2006
EMERY W. (TED) TETRAULT, son of Emery and Flora Tetrault, died after along illness at age 75 on February 8, 2006, at Lewes Convalescent Center, Lewes, Delaware. He is survived by his wife of 50 years, Joan, and his children, William of Brooklyn, NY, Joseph of Baltimore, MD, Theresa Moller of Washington, DC, Robert of Rockville, MD, and Julie of Laurel, MD. He is also survived by four grandchildren. Ted was born September 27, 1930 in Worcester, Massachusetts. He graduated from Assumption College in 1952 and enlisted in the U.S. Air Force that year.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | July 6, 1999
In Baltimore CountyCompany will pay to have clothes sent to Kosovar refugeesCATONSVILLE -- Senior Campus Living, a retirement home management company, is paying for 200 pounds of donated clothing to be shipped to Albania to help Kosovar refugees.The new and used clothing was donated by nearly 100 residents and staff members of Greenspring Village retirement community in Springfield, Va., which is managed by the Catonsville company.The clothing will be shipped to Albania aboard a military flight arranged by the U.S. State Department.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2001
Through the Roaring '20s, the Coast Guard spied on mobsters and rumrunners smuggling liquor into the United States as part of the country's first eavesdropping effort in the name of law enforcement. Those efforts -- which were a precursor to techniques used during World War II and in drug enforcement today -- are described in a new exhibit at the National Cryptologic Museum at Fort Meade. The exhibit, which includes photos, records and a model of a Coast Guard vessel, stirred the memories of Cliff Hyatt.
NEWS
August 31, 1998
Starting, managing business focus of one-day workshopSCORE Chapter 390 will conduct a one-day workshop, "How to Start and Manage Your Own Business," at the Heritage Center in Annapolis from 8: 45 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 9. The fee is $35. Information and registration: 410-266-9553.Chamber, retired executives offer advice on businessThe Chamber of Commerce of Greater Annapolis is working with the local chapter of the Service Corps of Retired Executives to assist owners and managers of large and small businesses.
NEWS
June 29, 2005
William Harry Jenkins, a retired National Security Agency executive and cryptographer, died of cancer Friday at Chesapeake Hospice House in Linthicum. The Millersville resident was 73. Born in Baltimore and raised in the Brooklyn section, he was a 1948 graduate of City College and served in the Army. He earned a pre-law degree from the University of Maryland, College Park and in 1953 graduated with a diploma in Russian language studies from the Defense Language Institute in Monterey, Calif.
NEWS
By SIOBHAN GORMAN and SIOBHAN GORMAN,SUN REPORTER | February 26, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Two technology programs at the heart of the National Security Agency's drive to combat 21st-century threats are stumbling badly, hampering the agency's ability to fight terrorism and other emerging threats, current and former government officials say. One is Cryptologic Mission Management, a computer software program with an estimated cost of $300 million that was designed to help the NSA track the implementation of new projects but is...
NEWS
February 11, 2006
EMERY W. (TED) TETRAULT, son of Emery and Flora Tetrault, died after along illness at age 75 on February 8, 2006, at Lewes Convalescent Center, Lewes, Delaware. He is survived by his wife of 50 years, Joan, and his children, William of Brooklyn, NY, Joseph of Baltimore, MD, Theresa Moller of Washington, DC, Robert of Rockville, MD, and Julie of Laurel, MD. He is also survived by four grandchildren. Ted was born September 27, 1930 in Worcester, Massachusetts. He graduated from Assumption College in 1952 and enlisted in the U.S. Air Force that year.
NEWS
June 29, 2005
William Harry Jenkins, a retired National Security Agency executive and cryptographer, died of cancer Friday at Chesapeake Hospice House in Linthicum. The Millersville resident was 73. Born in Baltimore and raised in the Brooklyn section, he was a 1948 graduate of City College and served in the Army. He earned a pre-law degree from the University of Maryland, College Park and in 1953 graduated with a diploma in Russian language studies from the Defense Language Institute in Monterey, Calif.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Annie Linskey | August 19, 2004
National Security Agency's Cryptologic Museum Where: There is no address. Really. But the NSA Web site does provide directions: From Baltimore, take 295 South or Interstate 95 South to Route 32 East toward Fort Meade. Move to left lane and exit onto Canine Road. Turn left at the light onto Colony Seven Road. Follow past the aircraft and Shell station into the museum parking lot. For more directions and a map, visit the Web site (see below). When: 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays-Fridays; 10 a.m.-2 p.m. every first and third Saturday.
NEWS
September 14, 2003
Interactive language exhibit to begin tomorrow at NSA The National Security Agency is unveiling an exhibit tomorrow at its National Cryptologic Museum that chronicles the evolution of languages and the importance of language analysis in intelligence gathering. The exhibit explains the process used by language analysts, and kiosks will allow visitors to experience the challenges of working with foreign languages. The exhibit also includes a replica of the Rosetta Stone. The National Cryptologic Museum opened at Fort Meade in Anne Arundel County in December 1993.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2003
As her schoolmates dashed outside to play hula hoop and tag, Haylee King, 9, and two dozen other pupils filed into the Linthicum Elementary School computer lab, set down their lunch boxes and logged onto the Internet as "secret agents." Logic puzzles flashed onto the computer screens, and a countdown clock started ticking. Haylee wore a look of intense concentration as she sparred with classmates in a game that involved fitting odd shapes together. "They really challenge you," said the serious-looking fourth-grader (code name: sportsgirl)
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Writer | March 6, 1994
For decades, the National Security Agency -- the country's electronic code makers and breakers -- publicly denied its own existence, becoming known jokingly as "No Such Agency."Ignoring the obvious was routine; NSA employees would admit only to working "at a government facility at Fort Meade."But no longer.While NSA remains tight-lipped about the secret cryptanalysis work at the tightly guarded complex at Fort Meade, the agency and its predecessors are proud of the history they have begun to share in the last two months with the people who underwrote it -- American taxpayers.
NEWS
By Natalie Harvey and Natalie Harvey,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 21, 1998
SEVERAL EAST Columbia high school students won prestigious awards at the 43rd Annual Baltimore Science Fair last month at Towson University.The fair is sponsored by the university and the Kiwanis Clubs of Towson and Baltimore.Oakland Mills High School's Joshua Green won a first-place award from the Optical Society of America, a $50 Cryptologic Museum certificate in mathematics from the National Security Agency, a National Space Society award and an honorable mention in Division I Sponsor Awards.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2001
Through the Roaring '20s, the Coast Guard spied on mobsters and rumrunners smuggling liquor into the United States as part of the country's first eavesdropping effort in the name of law enforcement. Those efforts -- which were a precursor to techniques used during World War II and in drug enforcement today -- are described in a new exhibit at the National Cryptologic Museum at Fort Meade. The exhibit, which includes photos, records and a model of a Coast Guard vessel, stirred the memories of Cliff Hyatt.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | February 23, 2000
Once so secret its employees were forbidden to utter the letters NSA when asked where they worked, the National Security Agency is now hawking coffee mugs and ashtrays emblazoned with the agency's logo. Even more surprising is that some people are willing to pay premium prices for what they believe is agency "secret stuff," the same items that come from the gift shop at the NSA's National Cryptologic Museum. The mouse pads, cups and hats hailing from what once was the nation's most clandestine place are turning up on the Internet auction site eBay, where they're fetching sometimes 10 times the gift shop price tag. Even items that are free on a shelf just inside the museum door have sold for hundreds of dollars, such as coloring books and, more recently, a pamphlet describing the mathematics of the World War II German encryption machine.
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