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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | January 28, 1994
There's always a danger in calling something unprecedented, especially when you're talking about something so esoteric (and, let's face it, unimportant) that no accurate records are kept by anyone. But if I'm correct, what's happening tonight marks the first time that edited and unedited versions of the same TV series have competed directly against one another in prime time.The series in question is "Tales From the Crypt," and an unedited repeat episode on HBO is scheduled against one of two slightly tamer repeats on Fox. Is this what the 500-channel superhighway has in mind?
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By Rebecca Logan and Rebecca Logan,Special To The Sun | April 15, 2007
Ask any old-timer in Perryman about local history and inevitably the swinging sailor will come to mind. For years, children who took field trips to the cemetery outside the Spesutia Church of St. George's Parish learned the legend of how an eccentric ship captain named John Clark Monk ordered his crew to transport him there when he died. Tour guides talked of sailors carrying their captain up a hill from the Chesapeake Bay, filling his boat-shaped casket with rum and hanging it from chains.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | January 22, 1994
Give the credit to cable TV tonight. It's got the few watchable offerings, and the one noteworthy series premiere on broadcast TV, "Tales From the Crypt," is a Fox repeat run of an HBO series.* "Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman" (8-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Since washing ashore in the premiere of "Twin Peaks," Sheryl Lee, who played Laura Palmer in life as well as in death, has made one good career move after another -- until, perhaps, tonight. But if she's looking for a range of roles, why not guest-star on a show that's set on the range?
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By BRADLEY OLSON and BRADLEY OLSON,SUN REPORTER | July 7, 2006
The Naval Academy will celebrate John Paul Jones' birthday tomorrow beginning at 9 a.m. with a march to the crypt of the legendary naval hero for a wreath-laying ceremony. A Revolutionary War re-enactor will give a lecture on Jones' life and his contribution to the war, followed by a flag raising ceremony at the Armel-Leftwich Visitor Center near Gate 1 at King George and Randall streets. The festivities will include music from The Fifes and Drums of Prince William III, a Virginia-based musical group, and cannon-loading demonstrations.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | March 26, 1994
If you have cable, there's a lot worth watching tonight. If you don't, there isn't.* "NCAA basketball tournament" (3:30 p.m.-conclusion, WBAL, Channel 11) -- When this afternoon's games are over, the NCAA will have 50 percent of its Final Four in place. CBS.* "Figure Skating World Championships" (8 p.m.-11 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Tonya Harding's plea bargain prevented her from competing in this contest. When network executives scheduled prime-time coverage of tonight's women's finals, undoubtedly the visions of post-Olympics glory, or ratings, danced in their heads.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | February 15, 1995
Tonight's TV highlight: Humphrey Bogart and Isabella Rossellini, together again for the first time, on a high-tech, "Forrest Gump"-ish pairing on the series finale of "Tales From the Crypt."* "When Stars Were Kids" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., Channel 11) -- No celebrity grows up in a vacuum -- although, given the embarrassing and private mini-revelations offered here by discarded acquaintances, many will wish they had. Yet another low-budget, lower-IQ special from Dick Clark.* "Disney's Nancy Kerrigan Special: Dreams On Ice" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., Channel 13)
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By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2004
It is a burial place fit for a king -- an ornate marble sarcophagus, decked in bronze, sitting in the center of an underground tomb. But the crypt of John Paul Jones, located beneath the Naval Academy chapel in Annapolis, has not always been given the royal treatment. Since 1913, when the Revolutionary War naval hero was laid to rest in the crypt, thousands of tourists have walked its marble floors, dragging in dust. Curious schoolchildren have run their hands along its smooth marble walls, leaving behind dirt and wads of chewing gum. Uncontrolled humidity has corroded the bronze dolphins and sea plants decorating the sarcophagus, turning them the color of moss.
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By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 5, 1990
ST. MARY'S CITY -- A 17th-century crypt containing at least three lead coffins, possibly the burial place of Colonial Gov. Philip Calvert and other members of the family that founded Maryland, was uncovered here yesterday.Discovery of the crypt beneath the remains of the 1667 Great Brick Chapel, the cradle of Roman Catholicism in English-speaking North America, was hailed as among the most significant archaeological finds ever in the state."In terms of religious and political significance, it ranks extremely high," said Dr. Edward Papenfuse, state archivist.
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By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2005
When the American Colonies were being pummeled by British forces during the Revolutionary War, a pugnacious Scotsman in charge of a Continental Navy ship took a daring risk: He took the fight to the British. In battle after battle off the European continent, John Paul Jones scored stunning victories for the fledgling American Navy against larger, more powerful British ships. His famous rallying cry - "I have not yet begun to fight!" - is said to have been yelled during a pitched battle off the English coast in 1779 with a supposedly superior British frigate, which Jones ultimately captured.
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By Dan Rodricks | May 14, 2001
I TRY TO understand. When businessmen explain themselves, I listen and try to appreciate their perspective. All that stuff about profit margins and P/E ratios and the pressure to keep operating costs under control - we've all heard it. We understand it. But then there are days when, in the midst of all that yadda yadda, I feel like saying: "Both Larry Triplett's parents died in the same week. For God's sake, cut him a break." This is one of those days. The aforementioned Larry Triplett grew up in Hamilton, in Northeast Baltimore, the son of Dolores and Charles Triplett.
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July 5, 2006
John Paul Jones celebration -- The U.S. Naval Academy will observe John Paul Jones Day from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday at the Armel Leftwich Visitor Center at 52 King George St. Annapolis. Activities will include a march to Jones' crypt and a Jones impersonator signing warrants and paying his crew. The cost is $8, $7 for adults older than 62 and $6 for students in first through 12th grade. Children younger than age 5 will be admitted free. Only vehicles with Department of Defense stickers or handicapped plates may drive onto the Naval Academy grounds; others must park off campus.
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By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | July 10, 2005
When the American Colonies were being pummeled by British forces during the Revolutionary War, a pugnacious Scotsman in charge of a Continental Navy ship took a daring risk: He took the fight to the British. In battle after battle off the European continent, John Paul Jones scored stunning victories for the fledgling American Navy against larger, more powerful British ships. His famous rallying cry - "I have not yet begun to fight!" - is said to have been yelled during a pitched battle off the English coast in 1779 with a supposedly superior British frigate, which Jones ultimately captured.
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By Chris Yakaitis and Chris Yakaitis,SUN STAFF | July 8, 2005
In the low light of the crypt beneath the Naval Academy chapel, John Paul Jones' sarcophagus gleams. The recently restored bronze-and-marble coffin shines like new. Eight marble pillars ring the centerpiece, with four triplets of American flags standing at regular intervals among them. Visitors stroll the cool interior of the circular chamber and inspect a succinct array of artifacts as uniformed midshipmen present brief histories of the Revolutionary War hero in hushed, respectful voices.
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By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2004
It is a burial place fit for a king -- an ornate marble sarcophagus, decked in bronze, sitting in the center of an underground tomb. But the crypt of John Paul Jones, located beneath the Naval Academy chapel in Annapolis, has not always been given the royal treatment. Since 1913, when the Revolutionary War naval hero was laid to rest in the crypt, thousands of tourists have walked its marble floors, dragging in dust. Curious schoolchildren have run their hands along its smooth marble walls, leaving behind dirt and wads of chewing gum. Uncontrolled humidity has corroded the bronze dolphins and sea plants decorating the sarcophagus, turning them the color of moss.
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By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 23, 2004
WASHINGTON - Presidential hopefuls have long feared the skeletons in their closet. But this year's contenders may have reason to rest easy: If they've got skeletons, at least some are safe in the hands of their fellow Bonesmen. That would be the men of Skull and Bones, the secret society at Yale University to which both President Bush and Democratic challenger John Kerry belonged as students - an exclusive club composed of 15 elite seniors at an already-elite school, campus hotshots whose many talents included the ability to guard each other's private lives to the grave.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 28, 2003
Perhaps nowhere is the issue of obesity in America more vividly illustrated than at Goliath Casket of Lynn, Ind., specialty manufacturers of oversize coffins. There, one can see a triple-wide coffin - 44 inches across, compared with 24 inches for a standard model. With extra bracing, reinforced hinges and handles, the triple-wide is designed to handle 700 pounds without losing what the euphemism-happy funeral industry calls its "integrity." When Keith and Julane Davis started Goliath Casket in the late 1980s, they sold one triple-wide, their largest model, each year.
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By Chris Kaltenbach | June 19, 2001
For those not easily spooked, touring Hollywood Forever is like walking through the pages of Hollywood history. Unlike the splashier Forest Lawn Glendale, which discourages visitors from wandering the grounds, sightseers are welcome here. The Hollywood Forever gift shop sells a combined guidebook and illustrated map for $15. Roam around the perimeter of the lake, and you'll find imposing granite and marble monuments for such legendary Hollywood names as Harry Cohn, Cecil B. DeMille and Tyrone Power.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 5, 2002
LOS ANGELES - Marilyn Monroe would have both loved and hated her final resting place. The private Marilyn - the fragile Norma Jean, whose low self-esteem never jibed with the glamorous figure adored by millions, whose voluptuous body kept people from acknowledging the artist trapped inside, whose irrepressible fame doomed the one real chance she had at happiness, her marriage to Joe DiMaggio - would appreciate the plain, unadorned marble crypt in a...
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 5, 2002
LOS ANGELES - Marilyn Monroe would have both loved and hated her final resting place. The private Marilyn - the fragile Norma Jean, whose low self-esteem never jibed with the glamorous figure adored by millions, whose voluptuous body kept people from acknowledging the artist trapped inside, whose irrepressible fame doomed the one real chance she had at happiness, her marriage to Joe DiMaggio - would appreciate the plain, unadorned marble crypt in a...
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