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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 26, 2003
Move over Tracy Turnblad. Make way for Cry-Baby. John Waters, who saw his fat Bawlamer teen-age heroine become the toast of Broadway in Hairspray, is now poised to see his archetypal Bawlamer "drape," aka, a ducktail-coiffed juvenile delinquent nicknamed "Cry-Baby," take center stage in a new Broadway musical based on his 1990 movie. Cry-Baby - which, like Hairspray, is a movie musical - is a logical choice for Broadway, Waters said yesterday. "It's an all-singing, all-talking class-warfare romantic musical - how's that for a pitch?"
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By Richard Gorelick, Chris Waldmann and Melissa Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
Now everything makes sense. In Episode 4 of what remains a not-so-stellar All-Star season, contestants looked into the camera and revealed to us the mysterious sources of their behavior. We in Apartment 81 had been thinking all along, for instance, that Dave and Connor, the father-and-son cancer survivors, were excruciating boring. It turns out that all along they were just Mormons. This turned out to be a non-elimination leg, which was good news for Brendon and Rachel , and good news for viewers, too. So far this season, Team Big Brother has generated more than their share of laughs, drama and emotion.
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By Chris Kaltenbach | April 26, 2008
Cry-Baby, which officially opened at New York's Marquis Theatre on Thursday night, may have emerged from the same twisted pop-culture DNA as that earlier megahit, Hairspray, but critics aren't exactly embracing it as a second flowering of John Waters-inspired genius. Some have labeled it truly awful, while at least one critic raved. Most seem to find it OK, if not extraordinary. Few are predicting a hit anywhere near the level of Hairspray, which won eight Tonys in 2003 and was turned into a 2007 movie that grossed nearly $120 million in the U.S. alone.
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Dan Rodricks | December 21, 2013
News of the closing of Simon "Cy" Avara's hair-styling academy - a Baltimore institution - arrives just as we enter the 50th anniversary of the start of the British Invasion of rock music. I make the connection because the British Invasion was as much about hair as it was about music, and one of the most notable things about Avara's career was his ability to adjust from crew cuts to mop tops. Not every barber was so flexible. First things first, regarding the British Invasion: A lot of people mark the start in early February 1964, when 73 million Americans tuned in to "The Ed Sullivan Show" to see the Beatles' debut on national television.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | May 27, 2007
NEW YORK / / Standing in front of 150 theater folk, John Waters holds up a newspaper. A huge picture shows lightning striking the Empire State Building. "Lightning can strike twice. Did you see yesterday in the Daily News -- the Empire State Building? All the time it happens. It can happen again," he says with the deadpan delight of a man gifted at finding beauty in potential disaster. The lightning Waters refers to, however, is metaphorical, not meteorological. Its first strike of good fortune was turning the filmmaker's 1988 movie, Hairspray, into a Tony Award-winning Broadway musical.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,sun theater critic | November 18, 2007
LA JOLLA, Calif. -- This spring, Catherine Zuber picked up her third back-to-back Tony Award for costume design. By any tape measure, that makes her a star in the theater world. But she, nonetheless, was on pins and needles last week, anticipating the opening of her newest project, Cry-Baby. "I've been a fan of John Waters' for such a long time," she said recently, during an interview in the costume shop at the La Jolla Playhouse. "Back in the 1970s, I couldn't wait for his next film to come out. I felt such a connection to his sense of humor.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | April 25, 2008
Opportunity knocked last night at the door of the Marquis Theatre, where Cry-Baby is making its Broadway debut. But nobody answered. Like Hairspray, this new musical is set in the Baltimore of John Waters' imagination. But Cry-Baby lacks the quirky lead characters who won its sassy sibling near-universal acclaim - not to mention the double fistfuls of Tony Awards. If you go Cry-Baby is playing at the Marquis Theatre, 1535 Broadway, New York, through Sept. 14. Tickets are $35-$250. Call 800-755-4000 or go to crybabyonbroadway.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Theater Critic | May 14, 2008
Cry-Baby, the exuberant song-and-dance spectacle inspired by Baltimore bad-boy John Waters, was nominated for four Tony Awards yesterday - including the most important prize, best musical. The nominations defy tepid critical reception and lackluster box-office receipts. The show, which is based on Waters' 1990 cult film of the same title, is a Romeo and Juliet saga set in 1954 Baltimore. "At 7:15 a.m. San Francisco time, I got the news and I was levitating from joy," Waters says. "I went up about 1 inch.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Chris Kaltenbach and Mary Carole McCauley and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporters | June 19, 2008
This week, when the Broadway cast of Cry-Baby launches into its second-act number "Misery, Agony, Helplessness, Hopelessness, Heartache and Woe," the rendition may be particularly heartfelt. It was announced yesterday that the $12.5 million production will close after Sunday's matinee. But that doesn't necessarily mean you won't be seeing Cry-Baby on a stage near you. And you'll certainly be hearing from John Waters, whose 1990 cult film inspired the Broadway musical. "I don't think this means the death of John Waters the musical," says Chris Caggiano, a musical theater professor at the Boston Conservatory and a lifelong Waters fan. "I think there are other possibilities, though they may be off Broadway."
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By Dan Rodricks | February 16, 2000
I don't do dope. Never bought drugs. Never borrowed my daddy's car -- like a certain woman named Constance did the other day -- to drive to some sad-looking neighborhood, with windblown trash and boarded-up houses, searching for some dope dealer on the corner. Never been there, never done that. Never got the taste. Never had the sickness. I'm clean. That means a lot of things. That means, for one, I won't be driving the family car down Poplar Grove Street, looking to buy heroin or cocaine, like the rest of those losers who come to Baltimore every day with cash.
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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2013
Despite a report to the contrary, filmmaker John Waters is very much alive. A website called National Report published a would-be obituary for Waters on Wednesday, with the headline: "Acclaimed Cult Filmmaker, John Waters … Drops Dead at 67!" The report went on to say he was found dead -- apparently of natural causes.  Despite the less-than legitimate look of the report or its source, a few folks believed it and began circulating it. This morning, a couple of people had already started mourning on Twitter, including one woman who Tweeted: "I woke up and John Waters is dead.
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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2012
Cleaned up but fresh off the highway from his cross-country hitchhiking trip, John Waters was hanging with a much more refined crowd this week -- the starlets and fashionistas at the 2012 Council of Fashion Designers of America Fashion Awards. Waters accepted a big prize at Monday's event in New York City on behalf of his friend Johnny Depp. Depp was awarded the Fashion Icon prize. While accepting it, Waters called the actor "the star who made dirty hair fashionable. " (Depp couldn't attend the event because he was filming "The Lone Ranger.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Chris Kaltenbach and Mary Carole McCauley and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporters | June 19, 2008
This week, when the Broadway cast of Cry-Baby launches into its second-act number "Misery, Agony, Helplessness, Hopelessness, Heartache and Woe," the rendition may be particularly heartfelt. It was announced yesterday that the $12.5 million production will close after Sunday's matinee. But that doesn't necessarily mean you won't be seeing Cry-Baby on a stage near you. And you'll certainly be hearing from John Waters, whose 1990 cult film inspired the Broadway musical. "I don't think this means the death of John Waters the musical," says Chris Caggiano, a musical theater professor at the Boston Conservatory and a lifelong Waters fan. "I think there are other possibilities, though they may be off Broadway."
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | June 16, 2008
Lin-Manuel Miranda might have grown up In the Heights, but his current address is on top of the world. Last night, the theatrical love song that Miranda penned to his childhood stomping grounds of Washington Heights won the 2008 Tony Award for best new musical. Miranda first began to work on his tale of the close-knit Manhattan neighborhood in 1999, when he was a sophomore at Wesleyan University. When the top Tony was announced, he was hoisted atop the shoulders of the members of the cast.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | June 15, 2008
For slightly less than four minutes tonight, Charm City, circa 1954, will grab the spotlight -- and possibly try to fence it. The 2008 Tony Awards will be handed out at New York's Radio City Music Hall. In keeping with tradition, one number from each of the four shows nominated for best musical will be staged during the live, three-hour national broadcast. Cry-Baby, the stage version of John Waters' cult 1990 film, made the cut, and the show's producers have decided to re-enact a maximum-voltage prison break sequence called "A Little Upset."
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Theater Critic | May 14, 2008
Cry-Baby, the exuberant song-and-dance spectacle inspired by Baltimore bad-boy John Waters, was nominated for four Tony Awards yesterday - including the most important prize, best musical. The nominations defy tepid critical reception and lackluster box-office receipts. The show, which is based on Waters' 1990 cult film of the same title, is a Romeo and Juliet saga set in 1954 Baltimore. "At 7:15 a.m. San Francisco time, I got the news and I was levitating from joy," Waters says. "I went up about 1 inch.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun Theater Critic | April 20, 2008
It all started with a bit of hero worship. Little Johnny Waters was mesmerized by the teenage neighbor with the defiant pompadour. This rebel on a motorcycle inspired a cult classic film starring Johnny Depp. But, it didn't stop there. Now, Cry-Baby is headed for Broadway, after a solid year of adding and subtracting dance numbers and characters and songs, of rhyming and re-rhyming and memorizing dialogue and throwing it out, of ceaseless tweaking and second-guessing. `Cry-Baby' on Broadway Opens Thursday at the Marquis Theatre, 1535 Broadway, New York.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 19, 2004
Cry-Baby, the next John Waters movie-turned-musical heading for Broadway, will have a score composed by Adam Schlesinger (co-founder of the Grammy-nominated band Fountains of Wayne) and lyrics by David Javerbaum (Emmy Award-winning head writer for The Daily Show), producer Adam Epstein has announced. The newly formed songwriting team joins previously announced book writers Mark O'Donnell and Thomas Meehan, who won a Tony Award for their Broadway adaptation of Waters' Hairspray. Reached in New York where he is working on the sound mix for his forthcoming movie, A Dirty Shame, Waters explained that Schlesinger and Javerbaum submitted two songs - "One Tear" and "Girl, Can I Kiss You with Tongue?"
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By Chris Kaltenbach | April 26, 2008
Cry-Baby, which officially opened at New York's Marquis Theatre on Thursday night, may have emerged from the same twisted pop-culture DNA as that earlier megahit, Hairspray, but critics aren't exactly embracing it as a second flowering of John Waters-inspired genius. Some have labeled it truly awful, while at least one critic raved. Most seem to find it OK, if not extraordinary. Few are predicting a hit anywhere near the level of Hairspray, which won eight Tonys in 2003 and was turned into a 2007 movie that grossed nearly $120 million in the U.S. alone.
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By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | April 26, 2008
New York -- Only at the cast party for a Broadway musical inspired by John Waters would you find impeccably coifed and gowned drag queens rubbing shoulders with movie stars. Sometimes you could even tell them apart. Thursday's bash celebrating the opening of Cry-Baby attempted to re-create Baltimore circa 1954 (when the musical is set) in what now is a tony New York venue known as The Mansion. But Waters remembers when the joint had a seedier reputation. "In the '70s, this was a great S&M club," he says, his eyes misting over nostalgically.
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