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ENTERTAINMENT
By Clare McHugh and Clare McHugh,Special to the Sun | December 19, 2004
A Time of Angels By Patricia Schonstein. William Morrow. 224 pages. $24.95. Magical realism, a technique used so evocatively by Latin American writers such as Gabriel Garcia Marquez and Mario Vargas Llosa, separates literary masters from the mere journeymen who attempt to employ it. While creating a world both fantastical and recognizable is a worthy enough goal, it requires a subtle gift to pull off successfully. Done right, magical realism adds dimension and meaning to a story, but used inexpertly, it allows an author to take shortcuts, cheating readers out of the true parsing of experience and emotion they expect from a novel.
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NEWS
July 28, 2004
On July 25, 2004, CARLTON CRUTCH JR. Friends may call at the FAMILY OWNED MARCH FUNERAL HOME WEST INC., 4300 Wabash Avenue on Thursday after 2 P. M where the family will receive friends on Friday at 1 P. M at which time funeral services will begin. See www.marchfh.com
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 15, 2003
Given television's fondness for sex and violence, it's no surprise that in the coming weeks, dozens of programs mark the 40th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy's death by emphasizing two things: his assignations with women and his assassination in Dallas. In some cases, Judith Campbell and Marilyn Monroe get more air time than Fidel Castro and Nikita Krushchev. In others, the wrenching images of the widow in black, John-John saluting his father's coffin and the streets of Washington lined with grim and saddened faces so dominate the program that it seems as if Kennedy was killed as soon as he took office.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2003
For Dick Edell, one of the most successful coaches in the history of men's college lacrosse, the statistics only tell part of the story. In nearly two decades at the University of Maryland, he led teams to three Atlantic Coast Conference titles, 13 NCAA tournament appearances and three championship finals. To appreciate the impact he had on the lives of his players and fans, though, you would have had to have been at Byrd Stadium in College Park yesterday, where nearly 500 people showed up to help a man who has meant a lot to them.
BUSINESS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 21, 2003
Americans are aging, and so are their joints and bones. As rickety bones have made walking harder for millions of the elderly, countless companies have created medical devices to make getting around easier, creating a thriving industry in the process. Consumers spent $31.2 billion in 2000 on durable medical devices, which include artificial limbs, canes, wheelchairs, crutches, canes and hearing aids. That's nearly double the amount spent 10 years before, according to federal figures. Invacare Corp.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 7, 2001
Sometimes, love is a war best viewed from the sidelines. The mind games, the cutting words, the deceit - people can't really enjoy this stuff, can they? But hey, at least in Two Can Play That Game, the story of a woman trying to teach her man a lesson, and her man's refusal to learn without a fight, the carnage is leavened with a few laughs. Shante Smith (Vivica A. Fox) is a woman with her act together: She's smart, she's beautiful, she's got a big-time position with a big-time company, and she's got herself one fine specimen of man. She's so all-that, in fact, that she's the idol of her friends, who come to her for relationship advice.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | January 1, 2001
Instead of celebrating the Ravens' first playoff win like the rest of his teammates, Kim Herring left the locker room on crutches. The Ravens' strong safety was the biggest casualty yesterday and is questionable for Sunday's game at Tennessee with an ankle injury. He hurt his left ankle on the opening kickoff of the second half, getting his leg tangled with teammate Brad Jackson. "Right now, it's a pretty bad high-ankle sprain," Herring said. "It's basically see how it is Wednesday or Thursday.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | September 12, 2000
Baltimore heavyweight Hasim Rahman had surgery Friday to remove an abscess on his spine, which could keep him out of action "for at least six to eight weeks," according to a spokeswoman for the University of Maryland Medical Center. The two-hour operation, conducted at the medical center, forced the postponement of Rahman's 10-round fight with Danell Nicholson, an elimination bout scheduled for Oct. 7 in Connecticut for the International Boxing Federation's No. 2 ranking. "He had compression of the nerve roots of the spinal canal, causing leg weakness," said Dr. Barbara Lazio, chief resident in neurosurgery, who described the growth as "a collection of infectious material or pus, which is a staph infection."
ENTERTAINMENT
By John E. McIntyre and John E. McIntyre,Sun Staff | August 6, 2000
"He swathed himself in quotations -- as a beggar would infold himself in the purple of Emperors." -- Kipling Two roads lead to a reputation for learning and cultivation. The harder is to read a great many worthy books, which is laborious and unfashionable. The easier is to buy an anthology of famous quotations and skim it to garner tags to drop into conversation. For successful bluffing, a comprehensive book of quotations is an indispensable tool. H. L. Mencken wrote in the 1920s that in the United States, "the general average of intelligence, of knowledge, of competence, of integrity, of self-respect, of honor is so low that any man who knows his trade, has read fifty good books, and practices the common decencies stands out as brilliantly as a wart on a bald head, and is thrown willy-nilly into a meager and exclusive aristocracy."
FEATURES
By Edward M. Eveld and Edward M. Eveld,KANSAS CITY STAR | April 11, 1998
About the first week of May, if all goes well, 52-year-old Sheila Brashear of North Kansas City, Mo., will have trekked to the base camp on Mount Everest. On crutches.There, at 17,500 feet, Brashear will celebrate 32 years as a cancer survivor.She was just 20 when she lost a leg to bone cancer. Never comfortable with a prosthesis because of a high amputation, Brashear has walked on crutches ever since."I was very lucky. The odds were against me," said Brashear, about her cancer, a tumor on the upper thigh.
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