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NEWS
June 19, 2013
Regarding your article about Gov. Martin O'Malley's efforts to pressure the Environmental Protection Agency to relax its "clean fuel" requirements for large cruise ships, it seems that both the Royal Caribbean and the Carnival lines have hinted they might move their businesses out of Baltimore Harbor If the EPA doesn't back down ("O'Malley lobbies EPA on fuel rule," June 16). The governor's press secretary even said that some 220 jobs and about $90 million a year could be lost to our region if the cruise lines make good on their threat.
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NEWS
By Tim Swift and The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2014
The Coast Guard transported a 58-year-old woman off a cruise ship on the Potomac River Friday after she was injured in a fall. The woman — who was not identified — was taken to shore by a 45-foot response boat from the Coast Guard's Station St. Inigoes and then transported to Maryland Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore by helicopter, said Petty Officer 3rd Class Jasmine Mieszala, a Coast Guard spokeswoman. The Coast Guard said a crew member from the Baltimore-based Grandeur of the Seas called for assistance around 10 p.m. Friday about 10 nautical miles off Smith Point in Charles County.
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NEWS
June 22, 2013
My wife and I are enthusiastic cruise ship passengers. We enjoy cruises and have taken 40 or more since we met on one in 1962 as teenagers. But I cannot agree with allowing cruise lines to pollute so that cruise ship passengers can save $5 a day on our voyages ("O'Malley lobbies EPA on fuel rule," June 16). The cleanliness of our air and water for ourselves and our grandchildren is much more important. Even when the EPA's new limit on sulfur in the bunker oil that cruise ships burn goes into effect in two years, the ships will still be putting 50 to 60 times as much sulfur into the air that we breathe than diesel cars.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
Nearly eight years after it was ordered, the cruise ship Pearl Mist will embark finally on its maiden voyage Wednesday from Baltimore's Inner Harbor, ending the vessel's protracted saga. The 335-foot cruise ship, which spent the past year being finished at a Salisbury shipyard, will depart for an 11-night "Maritime New England Cruise" that will take the 210-passenger vessel north to Halifax, Nova Scotia, where it was built. A lengthy legal dispute between the ship's buyer and its builder delayed its cruise schedule for years.
MOBILE
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman and The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2011
If you had Caribbean dreams in your travel plans for this week, they're fading rapidly into reality with the arrival of Hurricane Irene , a powerful storm that has targeted Puerto RIco, the Dominican Republic, the Bahamas and potentially the entire Eastern seaboard of the U.S. As of this morning, the National Hurricane Center has issued hurricane warnings and watches for several of the Caribbean islands, with the chance for a direct hit over...
NEWS
June 20, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley is importuning the Environmental Protection Agency so as not to lose Baltimore's lucrative cruise ship business ("O'Malley lobbies EPA to ease cruise ship pollution rule," June 16)! Isn't that odd? He has been running businesses out of the state with seemingly great alacrity! Has he turned over a new leaf? Hey Martin, kudos, you have taxed the rain; what's next, the sun? How about the air that we breathe? I know that you are exploring every "opportunity" to create a new tax that you'll need to support all of those "new citizens" (voters)
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | May 8, 1994
Gambling will be prohibited this year on all cruise ships plying the waters off Alaska's rugged coastline.While Alaska banned gambling in 1978, many foreign-registered cruise ships continued to operate casinos. "Foreign-flagged ships believed they weren't subject to Alaska's regulations because they were just passing through," says Mark Rosenbaum, a U.S. attorney in Anchorage.After receiving complaints last summer from local cruise companies that some foreign-flag ships were violating Alaska's ban on gambling, the U.S. attorney ordered the foreign cruise ships to close the casinos while in Alaskan waters and en route to destinations like Glacier Bay, Mr. Rosenbaum says.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | March 17, 2002
The Celebrity Cruises ship Galaxy will make its first trip out of Baltimore on March 25 loaded with about 21,600 pounds of beef, 25,250 pounds of fresh vegetables, 4,082 gallons of milk and truckloads of just about everything else 1,850 passengers might crave at a midnight buffet in the Caribbean. "What they buy in food is unbelievable," said Alan H. Kotz, president of Baltimore ship supplier R.S. Stern Inc. Kotz, who made a sales call at Celebrity's Miami headquarters last month, wants a piece of that business.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | April 14, 1993
Don't look just yet, but more cruise liners could be docking in Baltimore.Eyeing potential economic development benefits, Maryland lawmakers reversed Monday a long-standing law that forced cruise ships to shut down their casinos while sailing the six hours up the Chesapeake Bay to Baltimore."
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | July 12, 1998
Picture 25,000 cruise passengers disembarking in Baltimore each year to walk the Inner Harbor, shop at Harborplace, dine at nearby restaurants and visit the attractions."
NEWS
By Justin George and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2014
Passengers boarding the Grandeur of the Seas arrived Saturday at the port of Baltimore carrying their luggage, hopes for a relaxing vacation and, in some cases, extra vitamins to ward off illnesses that have plagued the ship's last two voyages. "We're very concerned, especially because it's been onboard twice," said Gwen Rivera of Millersville, Pa., who planned to make her 13-year-old son, Brock, swallow some Vitamin C as soon as they boarded the Royal Caribbean cruiseliner. Her apprehension was shared by many passengers after learning that the Grandeur of the Seas had been struck by a second outbreak of a gastrointestinal illness in the past two voyages.
NEWS
March 7, 2014
Letter writer Anita Heygster's claim that the Port of Baltimore is only open five days a week and closed on holidays is incorrect ( "Port union is hurting its members," March 4). The Port of Baltimore has one of the most flexible work schedules on the East Coast. Ship operations continue 24/7, with only six holidays a year when there is no work allowed. The only exception to that is for cruise ships, which work any day of the year. Ms. Heygster might want to check her facts before making such erroneous and misleading statements.
NEWS
January 31, 2014
It seems strange to celebrate the return of a ship that hasn't left yet, but that's what the recent announcement that the Carnival Pride will be sailing out of Baltimore beginning in March of 2015 amounts to. Last summer, Carnival Cruise Lines announced the ship would begin sailing out of Tampa, Florida beginning this November, and now, like a reliable snow bird, it's planning a return to Northern climes after just a few months in the Sunshine state....
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2013
Federal regulators have reached a tentative deal with Carnival Corp. on a plan to reduce air pollution from nearly a third of its cruise ships, but the accord comes too late to reverse at least a temporary loss of lucrative cruise business for Baltimore. Under the agreement, to be announced today, the Miami-based company pledged to install pollution control equipment on 32 of its ships over the next three years and use it while they cruise in waters near the U.S. coast. During that time, the Environmental Protection Agency and the Coast Guard will exempt those vessels from a pending requirement that they burn less-polluting fuel.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2013
The port of Baltimore's cruise business was made whole Friday morning, when Grandeur of the Seas began loading passengers for its first ocean voyage since a fire put the vessel in dry dock more than six weeks ago. Despite gray skies and precipitation that toggled between mist and monsoon, smiling adults and children juggled a week's worth of vacation belongings through the Cruise Maryland Terminal and onto the 917-foot ship owned by Royal Caribbean...
NEWS
July 3, 2013
The days when people bragged about taking a cruise to the Caribbean are long gone. The afterglow from a week at sea with all-you-can-eat amenities topped off with a tan is gone as well. And the EPA has nothing to do with it ("Carnival has plans to ship out of port," June 28). Anyone who has been half-aware of the news headlines over the last year has noticed a gigantic spike in cruise ship mishaps. We've watched as an Italian ship cruising off the Mediterranean coast literally re-enacted the story of the Titanic.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | December 11, 1994
In the waning days of the Schaefer administration, the state is pushing to wrap up negotiations to buy a site from AlliedSignal Inc. for an Inner Harbor cruise ship terminal.The terminal -- expected to cost $50 million, or double initial projections -- is a priority with Gov. William Donald Schaefer. And state officials are hoping at least to purchase the 1.2-acre site adjacent to the old chrome works plant before the governor leaves office in January."The Inner Harbor needs a shot in the arm," Mr. Schaefer said in a recent interview.
TRAVEL
By Arline and Sam Bleecker and Special to Tribune Newspapers | March 30, 2010
Like migratory birds, cruise ships regularly shift from one part of the world to another as the seasons shift -- from the Caribbean to Europe or South America or from Alaska or the West Coast to Asia or the South Pacific, for example. These usually twice annual exoduses are so huge that they could rival a naval armada, and they offer exceptional bargains, as well as lots of languid days at sea, and, occasionally, even unusual ports of call. Veteran cruise book author Kay Showker considers repositioning cruises "about the best value in cruising," compared with a regular cruise on the same ship.
NEWS
July 1, 2013
Reaction to the decision by Carnival Cruise Lines to leave the Port of Baltimore next year because the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has not agreed to its proposal to use scrubbers, instead of cleaner fuel, to meet air quality requirements breaks down like this: Those who hate government regulation blame the EPA; those suspicious of polluters blame Carnival; and those caught in the middle just want to see jobs restored. Indeed, it's difficult to know who to blame. Has Miami-based Carnival been a good corporate citizen, and is its proposal an honest effort to clean the air?
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2013
Still smarting from news that half of Baltimore's lucrative cruise business is headed south next year, the state's ports chief said Friday that officials are already working on replacing the Carnival Pride. Carnival Cruise Lines announced Thursday that the Pride's weekly cruises from Baltimore to the Bahamas and Caribbean will end in November 2014, when the 2,124-passenger ship will transfer to Tampa, Fla. Officials of the Miami-based company said pending federal requirements to reduce air pollution on all ships in coastal waters prompted their decision.
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