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By New York Times News Service | January 18, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The allied onslaught against Iraq included the first use in combat of the Tomahawk sea-launched cruise missile, an unmanned weapon that for a decade has promised to alter the course of future conflicts.Among the very first shots fired were Tomahawks fired from Navy ships, more than 100 of these long-range guided missiles by yesterday morning.The missiles inflicted major damage at little or no risk to U.S. personnel.The missiles cruise under computer control to targets hundreds of miles away, delivering with great accuracy a warhead powerful enough to demolish a concrete building.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
The Army is planning to launch a pair of blimps over Maryland this fall to watch the Eastern Seaboard for incoming cruise missiles. It's what else they might be able to see from up there that worries privacy advocates. The Army says the aerostats — blimps that will be tethered to the ground in Harford and Baltimore counties — will carry technology capable of detecting, tracking and targeting cruise missiles and rockets up to 340 miles away. That means they can cover an area from North Carolina to the Canadian border.
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NEWS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | December 20, 1998
The American B-52s flying raids out of Diego Garcia never crossed into Iraqi airspace, but their bombs did.Cruise missiles were one of the technological stars of the campaign against Iraq that ended yesterday, penetrating deep into Iraq and homing in on targets without putting U.S. pilots at risk.A B-52 with a load of about a dozen AGM-86 cruise missiles can loiter in friendly airspace, pop its missiles out of a revolving canister and return safely home without ever facing hostile fire.Pentagon officials offered several examples of the cruise's almost delicate bombing accuracy.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
The Pentagon plans to launch a pair of helium-filled blimps over Aberdeen Proving Ground capable of detecting, tracking and targeting cruise missiles, rockets and aircraft 340 miles away. Military officials offered details of the Joint Land Attack Cruise Missile Elevated Netted Sensor System, or JLENS, at a sparsely attended public hearing Thursday in Baltimore County. The 240-foot-long blimps, known as aerostats, would be tethered at an altitude of two miles over the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin, Michael Dresser and Laura Cadiz and Todd Richissin, Michael Dresser and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | October 6, 2001
MYERSVILLE -- A tractor-trailer carrying eight Navy cruise missiles filled with rocket fuel clipped the wall of a bridge on Interstate 70 and tumbled down an embankment yesterday, causing hours-long traffic jams and the evacuation of nearby houses. Nobody was injured, and officials said foul play was not suspected in the incident. The accident occurred about 8:45 a.m. as the eastbound rig was passing through a construction zone about 10 miles west of Frederick, according to Sgt. T.O. Rouse of the Maryland State Police.
NEWS
By TOM BOWMAN AND MARK MATTHEWS and TOM BOWMAN AND MARK MATTHEWS,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 25, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Allied ships and aircraft attacked scores of military targets, from missile sites to barracks, throughout Yugoslavia yesterday in the first wave of a NATO bombing campaign designed to stop the slaughter of ethnic Albanians in the province of Kosovo.President Clinton said the aim was to weaken the Yugoslav military to the point where it can't commit more atrocities. If the Western allies failed to act now, he said, the tragedy of Bosnia could be repeated, causing heavy bloodshed and regional instability.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 21, 1998
WASHINGTON -- In the most forceful response against terrorism of the Clinton presidency, the United States launched a surprise missile attack yesterday against targets in Afghanistan and Sudan that U.S. officials linked to suspected terrorist Osama bin Laden.President Clinton said the strike was designed to punish those responsible for the recent embassy bombings in Kenya and Tanzania and head off "an imminent threat" to America's security by terrorist groups connected to bin Laden."The risks from inaction to America and the world would be far greater than action," said Clinton, who interrupted his vacation in Martha's Vineyard, Mass.
BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,Sun Staff | April 10, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Lockheed Martin Corp. scored a big win yesterday when the Air Force selected it over Boeing Co. to build a new generation of ultra-smart cruise missiles.The multibillion-dollar Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile contract represents the first time the Pentagon has chosen between the rival companies since they became the dominant forces in the defense industry."I can say very clearly that Lockheed had a superior proposal in just about every aspect, including cost," said Darleen A. Druyun, a top Air Force acquisitions official, during a Pentagon news conference.
NEWS
By STANSFIELD TURNER | October 25, 1993
On June 26 we attacked Baghdad with 23 unmanned missiles launched from 300 to 600 miles away. It was a seminal change in the art of warfare. Although we saw this same action during Operation Desert Storm, the lesson was lost in the plethora of other activities. We should learn it now if we are going to reshape our military sensibly to the demands of a new world order.The message: Sophisticated technology is increasingly being placed in the weapon, rather than in the platform that launches it. In this case it made no difference that the cruise missiles came from a destroyer and a cruiser at sea. The platform could have been an aircraft carrier or a merchant ship; a B-1 bomber or a 747 airliner.
NEWS
September 11, 2013
The debate on Syria is much too limited ("Syrian rebels ready to strike if U.S. does," Sept. 6). It should not be about military effectiveness, national interest, or building coalitions. The more relevant question is why, after 6,000 years of civilization with extraordinary advances in technology, human rights, education, health and quality of life, when another nation acts badly the best we can come up with is to drop explosives on him? Really? We are back to the Stone Age and only the sophistication of the weapons has changed.
NEWS
September 11, 2013
The debate on Syria is much too limited ("Syrian rebels ready to strike if U.S. does," Sept. 6). It should not be about military effectiveness, national interest, or building coalitions. The more relevant question is why, after 6,000 years of civilization with extraordinary advances in technology, human rights, education, health and quality of life, when another nation acts badly the best we can come up with is to drop explosives on him? Really? We are back to the Stone Age and only the sophistication of the weapons has changed.
NEWS
By Peter Spiegel and Peter Spiegel,Los Angeles Times | October 20, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Air Force weapons officers assigned to secure nuclear warheads failed on five separate occasions to examine a bundle of cruise missiles headed to a B-52 bomber in North Dakota, leading the plane's crew to unknowingly fly six nuclear-armed missiles across the country. That August flight, the first known incident in which the U.S. military lost track of its nuclear weapons since the dawn of the atomic age, lasted nearly three hours, until the bomber landed at Barksdale Air Force Base in northern Louisiana.
NEWS
August 20, 2007
Dennis M. Sesak, who helped develop cruise missile technology at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, died Monday of multiple myeloma. The Howard County resident was 54. Mr. Sesak was a gardener and a carpenter who was passionate about conservation and public radio and television. He also was a leading expert on targeting systems for cruise missiles, a fact that came as a complete surprise to his family last week when his former boss escorted them into Mr. Sesak's office. "He never told them much about what he did," said Mr. Sesak's supervisor, Mike Foust.
NEWS
By David Holley and David Holley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 19, 2005
MOSCOW - Smugglers in Ukraine shipped 18 cruise missiles, each capable of carrying a nuclear warhead, to Iran and China at the beginning of the decade, Ukrainian prosecutors said yesterday. The apparent sale to Iran of 12 Soviet-era Kh55 cruise missiles, which have a range of 1,860 miles, probably will add to concerns in Washington, D.C., over alleged efforts to develop nuclear weapons in Iran. Allegations of the sales surfaced last month in comments by a Ukrainian legislator, but public confirmation by the administration of President Viktor A. Yushchenko came only yesterday.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | January 19, 2005
YORK, Pa. - Dan Whitfield has seen the future of personal transportation, and it looks like a stubby missile on two wheels and goes like one, too, depending on your tolerance for drawing attention from police cruisers. It's called an Ecomobile, or Eco, and it's basically a motorcycle enclosed in a hard shell that makes it suitable for riding all year around, in any kind of weather short of Buffalo in January. And since the shell is made of Kevlar carbon fiber - yes, Kevlar's the stuff bullet-proof vests are made of - and is three times stronger than a car's, it may appeal to those who see a motorcycle as nothing more than a rolling coffin with tailpipes.
NEWS
August 18, 2004
DEMOCRATS ARE WRONG to criticize President Bush's decision to reduce the number of American troops over the next few years in Germany and South Korea. They argue that big overseas deployments are still needed with the world in so much turmoil, and that the president's plan risks further alienating America's allies. In fact, this is the right move at the right time. Mr. Bush's critics, we suspect, are reallymotivated by a fear that, with fewer foreign entanglements, the administration might be tempted to follow an even more unilateral military policy.
NEWS
By Peter Spiegel and Peter Spiegel,Los Angeles Times | October 20, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Air Force weapons officers assigned to secure nuclear warheads failed on five separate occasions to examine a bundle of cruise missiles headed to a B-52 bomber in North Dakota, leading the plane's crew to unknowingly fly six nuclear-armed missiles across the country. That August flight, the first known incident in which the U.S. military lost track of its nuclear weapons since the dawn of the atomic age, lasted nearly three hours, until the bomber landed at Barksdale Air Force Base in northern Louisiana.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
The Pentagon plans to launch a pair of helium-filled blimps over Aberdeen Proving Ground capable of detecting, tracking and targeting cruise missiles, rockets and aircraft 340 miles away. Military officials offered details of the Joint Land Attack Cruise Missile Elevated Netted Sensor System, or JLENS, at a sparsely attended public hearing Thursday in Baltimore County. The 240-foot-long blimps, known as aerostats, would be tethered at an altitude of two miles over the Edgewood Area of Aberdeen Proving Ground.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 24, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Iraq's defense minister said yesterday that American forces driving north toward Baghdad had engaged in a pattern of "stops and swerves" around Iraqi defenses in cities and towns along the way, but that eventually they would have to "pay a heavy price in blood" by fighting for Baghdad if they wanted to topple Saddam Hussein. The warning by Gen. Sultan Hashim, delivered at an evening news conference, came only hours before a new intensification of U.S. bombing and missile attacks on the Iraq capital.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 23, 2003
WASHINGTON - At the heart of Operation Iraqi Freedom is the hunt for the chemical and biological weapons that U.S. officials have long said pose Saddam Hussein's greatest threat to America and the world. While officials said that sites related to these weapons were among the targets pounded by cruise missiles and precision-guided bombs during the past two days, they are silent about specific locations and how many sites were hit. No chemical or biological weapons caches have been located by U.S. ground troops, said defense officials.
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