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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2013
Striking longshoremen at the port of Baltimore worked at least one cruise ship Thursday as their stoppage closed the port's cargo terminals for a second day. Royal Caribbean International's Grandeur of the Seas arrived for its regular sailing, disgorging passengers and picking up more for an eight-night cruise to New England and Canada. Despite the strike by International Longshoremen's Association Local 333, union dockworkers handled luggage and performed other tasks Thursday for the big cruise ship, tied up at the Cruise Maryland terminal in Locust Point.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | July 19, 2014
Just like Lewis Carroll's Alice, I slipped down an Internet rabbit hole and I found myself face to face with Collabro, a musical theater boy band from Britain. Suddenly it was 1966, The Monkees were on, and I was in love with the shy one again. Five tenors, ages 20 to 24, each with a hardscrabble back story and a passion for show tunes. That's Collabro. Terminally adorable, with simple harmonies, they were the winners of "Britain's Got Talent" in June. I don't know what I was Googling when I stumbled on their stunning audition for the show, but I was hooked.
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NEWS
July 28, 1993
Cruise lines are big business. The Maryland Port Administration estimates the 13 cruise ships that docked in Baltimore in 1991 brought over 7,000 tourists here, generating some $2.6 million for the local economy. No wonder Gov. William Donald Schaefer stresses the importance of making Baltimore a more important East Coast cruise center.The benefits from cruise lines go far beyond what is usually associated with shipping, such as re-fueling, the tugboats and the dockside work crews. Passengers aboard these ocean liners spend an average of $337 during a port stay.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
When Carnival Cruise Lines decided to leave Baltimore last summer, saying the port had become too expensive because of environmental regulations, it was with substantial regret. The world's largest cruise line regularly filled its Carnival Pride cruise ship at the port of Baltimore with affluent first-time cruisers who found the Mid-Atlantic jumping-off point convenient. Meanwhile, Maryland saw about $50 million a year in economic value from the ship. After hearing the Pride would be heading to Florida to cut costs, state officials immediately began trying to salvage the relationship.
FEATURES
By Christopher Reynolds and Christopher Reynolds,LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 28, 1997
Many passengers have long presumed that port fees are merely a pass-along of various taxes and government levies that ports require cruise lines and their passengers to pay when they come to dock. It's long been the cruise industry's custom to exclude those fees (anywhere from $80 to $200, depending on the itinerary) from the fare figure advertised in large print by cruise lines.But over the last several years port fees have inflated, with many cruise lines adding other nongovernment expenses in with them, including payroll expenses, tugboat fees and phone bills.
TRAVEL
By McClatchy-Tribune | February 8, 2009
Casual-dress men, take heart: When you sail the seven seas, you can now leave that tux at home. Instead of a "formal" night, Carnival Cruise Lines now offers a "cruise elegant" evening. Other lines offer casual-dining alternatives for those who don't want to change out of their shorts. Still other lines have tossed the dress-up concept into the ocean. The thinking at Carnival: Requiring a tux was out of sync with the idea of a "fun" ship - and not always practical for someone dashing back from a late shore tour of horseback riding, snorkeling or a safari.
FEATURES
By Arline Bleecker and Arline Bleecker,Orlando Sentinel | March 26, 1995
There are lots of ways cruise lines lure passengers into booking a cruise -- from selling the sizzle to baiting the cruise hooks with gourmet food. Short of giving away a free cruise, though, the lures that probably make the most waves are the deals and discounts.Here are several that have been recently announced:* For years, Seabourn, a line at the top end that sails luxury vessels, has prided itself on staying out of the price-war fray; cruisers on its two ships generally plunk down around $1,000 a day for a cruise.
TRAVEL
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 6, 2002
John Williams of Hermosa Beach, Calif., was dismayed when he learned that Princess Cruises would automatically charge him $10 a day for gratuities on his Mexican Riviera sail in April. "Maybe I'm old school," he said, "but I don't think tipping should be automatic." But after talking to waiters and his room steward on his cruise, he changed his mind. "They were all strongly in favor of automatic tipping," he says, "because so often they get stiffed." An increasing number of cruise companies are adopting so-called automatic gratuity programs.
FEATURES
By Arline Bleecker and Arline Bleecker,ORLANDO SENTINEL | October 8, 1995
If you're considering a cruise, you might also want to consider an air/sea package, where the cruise line arranges your air travel and transfers of you and your luggage between airport and ship.Such packages now are available from hundreds of cities. For instance, Princess Cruises arranges air departures from 140 U.S. cities, from Akron, Ohio, to Wilkes-Barre, Pa.While mostly worry-free, air/sea packages don't guarantee that your flight won't be delayed or that your luggage won't be lost.
TRAVEL
By JANE ENGLE and JANE ENGLE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 23, 2006
Cruise ships may be glamorous, but many cruise terminals aren't. Stashed next to freight docks and container vessels, they have all the ambience of warehouses, which, in fact, some once were. "Cold and sterile" is how Douglas Ward, author of the Berlitz Complete Guide to Cruising & Cruise Ships, describes a typical passenger terminal. That may be changing. Cruise terminals, one-time stepsisters of industrial ports, are turning into Cinderellas. Their benefactors, the cruise lines, are spending hundreds of millions of dollars to rejuvenate old facilities and build new ones as the lines ride a wave of growth.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
Pride will only leave the port of Baltimore for a few months. Carnival Cruise Lines announced Thursday that its Carnival Pride cruise liner will return to the port of Baltimore in March 2015, after only a brief stint in Florida, thanks to new technologies that will help the ship meet federal emissions standards. Its return limits the economic impact of a decision in June, when the Miami-based company said it would move the Pride to Tampa starting in November 2014 due to increased costs of operating in coastal waters under the new regulations.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2013
Striking longshoremen at the port of Baltimore worked at least one cruise ship Thursday as their stoppage closed the port's cargo terminals for a second day. Royal Caribbean International's Grandeur of the Seas arrived for its regular sailing, disgorging passengers and picking up more for an eight-night cruise to New England and Canada. Despite the strike by International Longshoremen's Association Local 333, union dockworkers handled luggage and performed other tasks Thursday for the big cruise ship, tied up at the Cruise Maryland terminal in Locust Point.
NEWS
June 22, 2013
My wife and I are enthusiastic cruise ship passengers. We enjoy cruises and have taken 40 or more since we met on one in 1962 as teenagers. But I cannot agree with allowing cruise lines to pollute so that cruise ship passengers can save $5 a day on our voyages ("O'Malley lobbies EPA on fuel rule," June 16). The cleanliness of our air and water for ourselves and our grandchildren is much more important. Even when the EPA's new limit on sulfur in the bunker oil that cruise ships burn goes into effect in two years, the ships will still be putting 50 to 60 times as much sulfur into the air that we breathe than diesel cars.
NEWS
June 19, 2013
It is bad enough that Carnival Cruise Lines would ask for an exception to the EPA requirement that its ships use cleaner fuel, but to threaten to take its business away from Baltimore is blackmail: The governor should have shown stronger character and not fallen for this ploy ("O'Malley lobbies EPA on fuel rules," June 16). This is just another case where states or counties try to influence businesses to come or stay in their jurisdiction because they believe the jobs they offer nullify the sordidness of these nefarious deals.
NEWS
June 19, 2013
"Sometimes, all I need is the air that I breathe and to love you!" Gov. Martin O'Malley, do you hear these words from the citizens of Maryland or are they just lyrics from a The Hollies 1974 hit song that many of us remember? Have you completely disregarded human life in your quest for higher office? These are my questions to you. After reading the investigation by The Sun's Timothy Wheeler ("O'Malley lobbies EPA on fuel rule," June 16), am I to believe that this is how our governor protects the citizens of Maryland?
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2013
As 20 Harley-Davidsons growled across the asphalt at the Maryland Cruise terminal Monday morning, "Easy Rider" met "The Love Boat. " After a briefing from their tour leader, the bikers inched their machines up the ramp and into the yawning hold of the 2,200-passenger Enchantment of the Seas. Next stop: Labadee, a private port resort on the north coast of Haiti. Motorcycle cruising might be the ultimate surf-and-turf dream, a chance for bikers to ride off a passenger ship and onto sun-drenched Caribbean back roads.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2013
Seven years after opening the South Locust Point cruise ship berth and terminal, Maryland port officials have a problem: capacity, as in, not enough. Without expansion, the record-breaking annual statistics will plateau at about 100 cruises and 241,000 passengers a year. It is a profitable perch, but not one that fits the port of Baltimore's competitive nature or record of expanding market share wherever it can - from autos to coal. And with an annual economic value to Maryland estimated to be $90 million and 220 jobs, the cruise ship business is an asset worth protecting and continuing to develop.
EXPLORE
March 28, 2012
American Cruise Lines has announced it will return to Havre de Grace again this year, as its American Glory is scheduled to make port stops in the city during May and early June. According to American Cruise Lines, the American Glory offers discerning travelers a unique and modern style of small ship cruising. Each unique and off-the-beaten path port visited, gives guests a glimpse into the cultural heritage that is the fabric of our great nation. The country-club atmosphere onboard allows guests to relax, and enjoy the company of fellow travelers who share their interests in American history and culture.
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