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By Jerry Morris and Jerry Morris,BOSTON GLOBE | October 13, 1996
Is bigger better?That is a question the cruise world will soon find out. Next month, the world's largest cruise ship, the 102,000-ton Carnival Destiny, takes to the seas. It will sail the Mediterranean Sea and Atlantic Ocean on its way to the Caribbean. It is too large to fit through the Panama Canal.Passengers on the Destiny probably won't be thinking about the Panama Canal, however, because this ship will be a wonder in itself. The Destiny will also have many innovative design features -- features that just may help attract more vacationers to the sea because it will appeal to those who think a cruise is too confining or sedentary.
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By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Cruising gets a bad rap. "It's boring. " "It's for people of a certain age. " "It's all about the food, and even that's not very good. " "Don't even get me started on the faux Broadway entertainment!" Those are the high seas haters. The travelers who are far too superior to settle for a superior cabin. But do they have a point? Google "cruise disasters," and you'll see they have more than one. Poor maintenance, fires, pollution, rogue staff, viral outbreaks - to name just a few recent highlights.
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FEATURES
By New York Daily News | July 31, 1994
It looks like smooth sailing ahead for the cruise industry. Not only is consumer interest in cruising at an all-time high, but the ranks of "hot prospects" also have grown substantially, according to a new study conducted for Cruise Lines International Association.The study says that almost 44 million people believe they will "definitely or probably" take a cruise vacation within the next five years, and that the vast majority see themselves sailing within the next two years.Among the "hot prospects," the average age has come down (42)
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2013
Carnival Cruise Lines announced plans Thursday to leave the port of Baltimore, a move that could cost the region scores of jobs and millions in economic activity generated by big-spending passengers and businesses servicing the ships. The Miami-based company said that without federal approval of its plan for curbing air pollution, it would cut back on the number of cruises and move the Pride to a dock in Tampa, Fla., in November 2014. The Pride, a 2,124-passenger ship, sails weekly from Baltimore to the Bahamas and Caribbean.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2012
Port of Baltimore passenger cruise traffic rose nearly 20 percent in 2011, the fourth consecutive year of customer increases, the Maryland Port Administration announced Monday in a news release. More than a quarter million people sailed on 105 cruises, good for fifth place on the East Coast and 12th place nationwide. Port officials say about 220 jobs are tied to the cruise industry and estimate the value of cruising to the state economy at $90 million. The port has 100 cruises scheduled this year.
TRAVEL
By MARY LU ABBOTT and MARY LU ABBOTT,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 9, 2006
A cruise ship fire March 23 that killed one person and injured 11 has prompted an investigation that could bring about changes affecting consumers and the cruise industry. The 3 a.m. blaze aboard Princess Cruises' Star Princess, sailing from Grand Cayman to Montego Bay, Jamaica, swept through 100 cabins on the four-year-old vessel, melting balconies along three upper decks, charring interiors and leaving a large blackened section on the port side of the 18-deck mega-ship. Now officials are asking how this could have happened on a comparatively new cruise ship, built to the highest international safety standards designed to prevent such a disaster.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1995
Destination-intensive cruises are just one of many different theme excursions that the cruise industry has created to lure more passengers.Other theme trips include cruises for gourmet cooks, country and western music lovers, dieters, wine tasters, gardeners and investors. There are even ones for chocoholics.All have been designed to appeal to vacationers seeking "enrichment," in one form or another.According to the Cruise Lines International Association, the industry's trade and marketing association, 64 percent of the passengers polled in a recent survey said they want their trips to be learning experiences.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | July 12, 1998
Picture 25,000 cruise passengers disembarking in Baltimore each year to walk the Inner Harbor, shop at Harborplace, dine at nearby restaurants and visit the attractions."
NEWS
By Mike Bowler | December 7, 1992
CROSSING & CRUISING. By John Maxstone-Graham. Scribner's. 311 pages. Illustrated. $30.The other experts on passenger ships have disappeared in the wake of John Maxstone-Graham.Mr. Maxstone-Graham has the job you want. Half the year, accompanied by his wife Mary, he floats about the world on cruise ships, checking out their sight lines, cuisine, entertainment and comfort level. He hobnobs with captains, pursers, fellow passengers, and he almost never goes ashore. The destination is of less importance to Mr. Maxstone-Graham than the vessel.
BUSINESS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporter | June 6, 2008
Baltimore will become a year-round cruise port when behemoth Carnival Cruise Lines begins weekly sailings that it expects will handle 115,000 passengers annually, beginning in September 2009. Miami-based Carnival Corp., the world's largest cruise line, said yesterday that the 2,124-passenger Carnival Pride will offer a pair of seven-day itineraries to such destinations as the Turks and Caicos islands, the Bahamas and Florida, through August 2011. It will be the northernmost port where Carnival offers year-round cruises.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley has interceded with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on behalf of Carnival Cruise Lines after the company threatened to pull its business from Baltimore over a pending air-quality regulation that would require large, ocean-going ships to burn cleaner fuel. O'Malley spoke twice with Bob Perciasepe, acting EPA administrator, since late May to support Carnival's request for what the governor's press secretary called a waiver from the agency's cleaner-fuel mandate.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
They left Baltimore on Friday by cruise ship and came back Tuesday by charter jet. The passengers from the Grandeur of the Seas arrived safely and with sea stories to last a lifetime. A fire near the stern of the 917-foot Royal Caribbean International ship early Monday morning forced it to make an emergency detour to Freeport, Bahamas, and cut short the vacations of 2,224 passengers. It's the latest in a string of mishaps that have besmirched the reputation of the cruise industry.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2013
As 20 Harley-Davidsons growled across the asphalt at the Maryland Cruise terminal Monday morning, "Easy Rider" met "The Love Boat. " After a briefing from their tour leader, the bikers inched their machines up the ramp and into the yawning hold of the 2,200-passenger Enchantment of the Seas. Next stop: Labadee, a private port resort on the north coast of Haiti. Motorcycle cruising might be the ultimate surf-and-turf dream, a chance for bikers to ride off a passenger ship and onto sun-drenched Caribbean back roads.
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
The woman who died onboard a cruise ship that originated out of Baltimore was 64 years old and from central Virginia, the FBI said Tuesday as the agency continued to investigate her death as "suspicious. " The passenger from Midlothian, Va., outside of Richmond, was found dead in her cabin aboard the Royal Caribbean Enchantment of the Seas on Sunday. She was on a six-night, seven-day Bahamas cruise that left Baltimore March 18, the FBI said. "It's a death of undetermined causes," said FBI spokesman and Special Agent Rich Wolf.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2012
Port of Baltimore passenger cruise traffic rose nearly 20 percent in 2011, the fourth consecutive year of customer increases, the Maryland Port Administration announced Monday in a news release. More than a quarter million people sailed on 105 cruises, good for fifth place on the East Coast and 12th place nationwide. Port officials say about 220 jobs are tied to the cruise industry and estimate the value of cruising to the state economy at $90 million. The port has 100 cruises scheduled this year.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2010
Cruise lines make their money offering vacationers more of everything: Sunshine, food and drink, excitement. But when tragedy strikes — when a passenger is injured, or dies, or simply disappears — survivors say the cruise lines can be downright stingy: Reluctant to accept responsibility, tight even with information about what happened. Long-established U.S. Maritime law limits the lines' financial liability, in the event of the death of a passenger, to lost income, so there is often no compensation for the loss of the very young or the retired beyond funeral expenses, legal experts say. The death of Carol Martin Olson stirred an unwelcome sense of déjà vu among those who have lost loved ones about cruise ships.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2013
Carnival Cruise Lines announced plans Thursday to leave the port of Baltimore, a move that could cost the region scores of jobs and millions in economic activity generated by big-spending passengers and businesses servicing the ships. The Miami-based company said that without federal approval of its plan for curbing air pollution, it would cut back on the number of cruises and move the Pride to a dock in Tampa, Fla., in November 2014. The Pride, a 2,124-passenger ship, sails weekly from Baltimore to the Bahamas and Caribbean.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2001
With many travelers afraid to fly, the battered cruise-ship industry is beginning to send liners to secondary ports such as Baltimore in hopes that vacationers will be willing to drive or take a bus - instead of a plane - to board their vessel. The question for Baltimore and other cities hoping to profit from the trend is whether the business will stay once the memory of Sept. 11 begins to fade from the nation's consciousness. The answer could affect whether state transportation officials decide to invest in a new cruise-ship passenger terminal in the Inner Harbor.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2010
A cruise passenger who tried to revive a dying Reisterstown woman said the snorkelers who entered the water off the Bahamas last Friday were quickly overwhelmed by strong currents. "I am in fairly decent condition," said 52-year-old Robert Limmer of Timonium, a passenger aboard the Carnival Pride. But he and others who had joined the snorkeling tour off Grand Bahama found they were tiring as they tried to fight the current. "I knew after 20 minutes in the water I needed to return to the boat."
BUSINESS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporter | June 6, 2008
Baltimore will become a year-round cruise port when behemoth Carnival Cruise Lines begins weekly sailings that it expects will handle 115,000 passengers annually, beginning in September 2009. Miami-based Carnival Corp., the world's largest cruise line, said yesterday that the 2,124-passenger Carnival Pride will offer a pair of seven-day itineraries to such destinations as the Turks and Caicos islands, the Bahamas and Florida, through August 2011. It will be the northernmost port where Carnival offers year-round cruises.
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