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NEWS
April 23, 1992
"It is in the interest of fair and prompt administration of justice to discourage piecemeal litigation." -- Justice Thurgood Marshall.The Sun has been a consistent opponent of capital punishment since the Supreme Court re-instated it nearly 20 years ago. We believe it is cruel by contemporary standards. We believe it is unusual in the sense that only a very few criminals convicted of death penalty-eligible crimes are so sentenced. Thus it is unconstitutional. We also believe extra money spent on death penalty cases could be used to put more criminals behind bars.
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NEWS
By Wayne T. Fleming Sr | November 6, 2007
I am the father of the murder victim in the case in which a Baltimore County Circuit judge ruled that fingerprint evidence will not be allowed. I can't tell you how devastated my family is that the judge picked our case to challenge more than 100 years of precedents to make her point that current fingerprint forensic methodologies, although widely used around the world, have an insufficient scientific basis to be allowed as evidence in a capital case....
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | December 20, 2006
ARLINGTON, Va. -- Which of the following scenarios constitutes cruel and unusual punishment, as prohibited by the Eighth Amendment to the Constitution: (1) aborting a baby with a fully developed nervous system and probably inflicting great pain; (2) killing a nightclub manager in cold blood; (3) taking 34 minutes - twice the normal time - to execute the killer of the nightclub manager? Anti-death-penalty forces want us to believe No. 3. They claim the Dec. 13 execution in Florida of Angel Nieves Diaz took too long and required a second injection, thus violating the Eighth Amendment.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | October 12, 2007
BOSTON -- So we have a national moratorium of sorts. An unofficial stay of execution. All quiet in the death chambers. In the days since the Supreme Court decided to take on another death penalty case, 11 states - including Texas, the capital of capital punishment - have suspended executions. In two more states, inmates slated for death next week may be granted a reprieve. Even the Europeans who led the World Day Against the Death Penalty on Wednesday must have missed having their favorite international target.
NEWS
By LINDA R. MONK | January 22, 1993
Alexandria, Virginia. -- These are banner days for non-smokers. To the amazement of many, smoking was prohibited at the Orioles' new stadium, even though it is open-air. Then, the Environmental Protection Agency announced that second-hand smoke is a human carcinogen, confirming that it poses a significant health risk to non- smokers.Finally, the Supreme Court last week heard the case of Helling v. McKinney, in which a Nevada prisoner claims that being exposed to cigarette smoke is cruel and unusual punishment.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | June 28, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Executions of the mentally retarded are unconstitutional, the Supreme Court has ruled. That's a relief. I'd rather let dear little Kyrgyzstan stand alone as the only remaining country that allows regular executions of mentally retarded criminals. Nevertheless, an interesting backlash has erupted against the Supreme Court's decision, not so much for what it decided as the way it decided it. The complaint is that the high court's 6-3 decision is based not so much on legal precedent as on trends among the states, foreign countries, religious leaders, professional organizations and, most controversially, the results of opinion polls.
NEWS
By Glenn Small and Glenn Small,Sun Staff Writer | May 7, 1994
Acting more like a prosecutor than a condemned killer, John Frederick Thanos yesterday rattled off arguments for why an appeal to save his life should be dismissed.Standing before Judge Benson E. Legg in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, Thanos, 44, decried efforts by federal public defenders and a Washington law firm to pursue a federal appeal without his permission."To me," Thanos said, "what's going on now -- these lawyers who are hound-dogging me -- that's what I call cruel and unusual punishment, not the death sentence."
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | March 24, 2005
IF THE TRAGIC case of Terri Schiavo shows nothing else, it shows how easily "the right to die" can become the right to kill. It is hard to believe that anyone, regardless of his or her position on euthanasia, would have chosen the agony of starvation and dehydration as the way to end someone's life. No murderer would be allowed to be killed this way, which would almost certainly be declared cruel and unusual punishment, in violation of the Constitution, by any court. Mrs. Schiavo's only crime is that she has become an inconvenience - and is caught in the merciless machinery of the law. Those who think law is the answer to our problems need to face the reality that law is a crude and blunt instrument.
NEWS
By DAVID G. SAVAGE and DAVID G. SAVAGE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 27, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court justices sounded split along conservative and liberal lines yesterday during arguments on whether injections might be a cruel and painful method of execution. The justices are not likely to decide that ultimate question in the Florida case at hand, which focuses on a narrow issue. But the arguments offered insights into how the Supreme Court views the controversial issue of how best to put someone to death. The justices took up a Florida case to settle a procedural issue.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 21, 2002
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court returned yesterday to the issue of whether killers who are mentally retarded should face the death penalty, weighing whether its decision to uphold such executions 13 years ago should be reversed because of changing public opinion on capital punishment. The question before the court is whether executing a convicted murderer who is mentally retarded violates the Eighth Amendment's ban on cruel and unusual punishment. The court is reviewing the case of a Virginia man, Daryl R. Atkins, who has an IQ of 59 but was found competent to stand trial.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | December 20, 2006
ARLINGTON, Va. -- Which of the following scenarios constitutes cruel and unusual punishment, as prohibited by the Eighth Amendment to the Constitution: (1) aborting a baby with a fully developed nervous system and probably inflicting great pain; (2) killing a nightclub manager in cold blood; (3) taking 34 minutes - twice the normal time - to execute the killer of the nightclub manager? Anti-death-penalty forces want us to believe No. 3. They claim the Dec. 13 execution in Florida of Angel Nieves Diaz took too long and required a second injection, thus violating the Eighth Amendment.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,sun reporter | September 21, 2006
With the courtroom closed, its windows covered with white paper and the voices of the people inside being piped into a room four floors below, two members of Maryland's execution team testified yesterday in federal court about their understanding of the lethal injection procedures they carry out. The first man, a correctional officer identified only as "Injection Team E," testified that he is responsible for regulating the flow of the intravenous lines...
NEWS
By DAVID G. SAVAGE and DAVID G. SAVAGE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 27, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The Supreme Court justices sounded split along conservative and liberal lines yesterday during arguments on whether injections might be a cruel and painful method of execution. The justices are not likely to decide that ultimate question in the Florida case at hand, which focuses on a narrow issue. But the arguments offered insights into how the Supreme Court views the controversial issue of how best to put someone to death. The justices took up a Florida case to settle a procedural issue.
NEWS
By TAMARA LYTLE AND JOHN KENNEDY and TAMARA LYTLE AND JOHN KENNEDY,ORLANDO SENTIEL | January 26, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A last-minute decision by the U.S. Supreme Court to stop the execution of a Florida inmate could temporarily halt lethal injections throughout the country until April. The high court decided yesterday to hear an argument by convicted killer Clarence Hill that his civil rights would be violated by Florida's lethal-injection method because it causes inmates to suffer pain during the procedure. "This is a stunning and very welcome development that puts on hold all Florida executions and may well put a timeout on all lethal-injection executions in the United States," said Abe Bonowitz, director of Floridians for Alternatives to the Death Penalty.
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | March 24, 2005
IF THE TRAGIC case of Terri Schiavo shows nothing else, it shows how easily "the right to die" can become the right to kill. It is hard to believe that anyone, regardless of his or her position on euthanasia, would have chosen the agony of starvation and dehydration as the way to end someone's life. No murderer would be allowed to be killed this way, which would almost certainly be declared cruel and unusual punishment, in violation of the Constitution, by any court. Mrs. Schiavo's only crime is that she has become an inconvenience - and is caught in the merciless machinery of the law. Those who think law is the answer to our problems need to face the reality that law is a crude and blunt instrument.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 2, 2005
A divided Supreme Court abolished the death penalty yesterday for killers younger than 18, saying a "line must be drawn" barring a practice out of use in most states and banned by nearly every other country in the world. The court's 5-4 ruling reversed a 1989 decision allowing capital punishment for killers who were 16 or 17 at the time of their crimes, relying on an "evolving standard of decency" in American society and new research suggesting that teen murderers are less culpable than adult counterparts.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | July 4, 2001
Don't worry about Dick Cheney's health. George W. Bush is n the wings, educating himself to take over on a minute's notice. Banning smoking in state prisons and in their yards is cruel and unusual punishment. When Jiang Zemin decreed that China's capitalists may become Communists what he actually meant was vice versa. Be patriotic. Boycott firecrackers made by unpaid Chinese school children.
NEWS
October 13, 2004
FEW WOULD ARGUE that 16- and 17-year-olds should be able to buy tobacco, sign contracts, join the military. It's time that thinking was reflected in U.S. policy on the legality of killing underage killers. The Supreme Court today will consider the case of Christopher Simmons, who was sentenced to death for a murder he committed when he was 17. The Missouri Supreme Court overturned Mr. Simmons' death sentence, accepting the argument that the standards defining cruel and unusual punishment, which is forbidden by the Constitution, had changed since 1989, the last time the nation's top court had ruled on the death penalty for crimes committed by juveniles.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | June 16, 2004
The legal struggle surrounding condemned killer Steven Oken's fate moved at a furious pace yesterday, as a federal judge delayed the execution -- and attorneys for the state promptly appealed so that he may yet be put to death before week's end. A decision from the three-judge panel from the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit in Richmond, Va., could come as early as today. The judges could let stand the lower court decision to hold further hearings in the case next month. Or they could clear the way for Oken to be executed by lethal injection before his death warrant expires at midnight Friday.
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