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Crucifixion

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RECORD STAFF REPORT | April 1, 2013
The annual Way of the Cross observance in Havre de Grace began at noon Friday, as participants walked to several points in the city in this decades old Good Friday tradition organized by the Susquehanna Ministerium. "This is my 21st year and it predates me," Pastor Ron Tabor, of the First Christian Church of Havre de Grace, told the assembled group before the celebration began in David Craig Park. About a hundred people of all ages participated in Friday's walk, carrying a large wooden cross under sunny skies and breezy temperatures.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
On Easter Sunday 75 years ago -- April 9, 1939 -- Marian Anderson gave a concert on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial for a crowd of about 75,000 who braved the cool weather, and a huge national audience listening on radio. The African American contralto, who, Arturo Toscanini famously said, had a voice "such as one hears once in a hundred years," had been barred by segregationist policies from singing at Constitution Hall, run by the Daughters of the American Revolution. With help from the FDR Administration, Lincoln Memorial was made available to Anderson as an alternate site.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
On Easter Sunday 75 years ago -- April 9, 1939 -- Marian Anderson gave a concert on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial for a crowd of about 75,000 who braved the cool weather, and a huge national audience listening on radio. The African American contralto, who, Arturo Toscanini famously said, had a voice "such as one hears once in a hundred years," had been barred by segregationist policies from singing at Constitution Hall, run by the Daughters of the American Revolution. With help from the FDR Administration, Lincoln Memorial was made available to Anderson as an alternate site.
NEWS
RECORD STAFF REPORT | April 1, 2013
The annual Way of the Cross observance in Havre de Grace began at noon Friday, as participants walked to several points in the city in this decades old Good Friday tradition organized by the Susquehanna Ministerium. "This is my 21st year and it predates me," Pastor Ron Tabor, of the First Christian Church of Havre de Grace, told the assembled group before the celebration began in David Craig Park. About a hundred people of all ages participated in Friday's walk, carrying a large wooden cross under sunny skies and breezy temperatures.
NEWS
By Ann Egerton | October 11, 1992
LIVE FROM GOLGOTHA. Gore Vidal. Random House. 225 pages. $22. If you didn't like the controversial movie of a few years ago, The Last Temptation of Christ," you'll hate Gore Vidal's novel, "Live From Golgotha."
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,Contributing Writer | April 4, 1993
A young man, barefoot and dressed in a blue tunic, raised his arms as if to embrace the crowd.The scene was part of the performance at St. John Catholic School's annual "Living Stations" program on Friday afternoon. Seventh- and eighth-grade students did a live walk through the seven stations of the cross.The students pantomimed to the words and music of "His Last Days," by Dallas Holme.Shaun Love, a 14-year-old eighth-grader who portrayed Peter the disciple, began the play by pantomiming the words to a song about the denial of Jesus Christ.
NEWS
By Donna W. Payne and Donna W. Payne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 29, 2002
"God has raised this Jesus to life," asserted the apostle Peter in an early sermon that is recorded in the New Testament book of Acts, "and we are all witnesses of the fact." On Easter Sunday, Christians around the world and throughout Howard County will also testify to that event - the resurrection of Jesus Christ from death by crucifixion. The Easter celebration commemorates this core belief of Christendom, area clergy say. "The whole church year points to Easter," said the Rev. Jack Fitzgerald, senior pastor of Columbia's Alberta Gary Memorial United Methodist Church.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1999
Some parents were offended by a float in the Westminster Halloween Parade on Tuesday night because of a graphic depiction of the crucifixion of Christ with live actors.Their complaints might lead parade sponsors to set guidelines for the first time, but the church group that sponsored the float says it meant to convey a positive message of Jesus' unselfish love.Hands of Mercy, an evangelical outreach of First Assembly of God church on Cranberry Road in Westminster, sponsored the float. On a flatbed truck, a moaning actor covered with fake blood and wounds portrayed Jesus on the cross, while another man portrayed a Roman soldier pounding nails into his hands and feet.
TOPIC
By Christopher M. Leighton and Rosann M. Catalano and Christopher M. Leighton and Rosann M. Catalano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 15, 2004
THE DEATH of Jesus occupies a central place in the life of Christian communities around the world. Two billion adherents of the fastest-growing religion in the world wrangle about almost everything under the sun, but they all converge at the foot of the cross and struggle to discern the meaning of one of the most confounding stories ever told. This historic event comes into focus year after year with the season of Lent, and so the decision to release Mel Gibson's film, The Passion of the Christ, on Ash Wednesday (Feb.
NEWS
August 28, 1994
Wake-Up Call for BaltimoreThe writer is a candidate for Carroll County commissioner.Chavis' Crucifixion?In an outrageous statement, Dr. Benjamin Chavis, Jr. had the audacity to compare his firing as head of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to a "crucifixion." Since he apparently is looking to the scriptures, he should recall the story of how Jesus threw the money-changers out of the Temple.) Should the NAACP do less?Gene EdwardsSykesville
NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 24, 2012
OMG! Jesus had a wife? A highly regarded Harvard theological historian has introduced a tiny scrap of papyrus from the fourth century - judged to be authentic - on which are written the words, "Jesus said to them, 'My wife….'" Also written there is: "she will be able to be my disciple. " Karen L. King presented her findings in Rome last week, and some of the underpinnings of the Roman Catholic Church are swaying a bit: that Jesus was celibate as a demonstration of his commitment to God and had no female disciples.
NEWS
July 25, 2006
On Sunday, July 23, 2006, HOWARD LAWRENCE OCHS of Marley Park, cherished husband of 65 years to Doris M. Ochs, loving father of Mellissa Anderson, Bernadine Smith, Darlene Conley, Howard L. Ochs Jr., and the late Joseph H. Ochs, dear brother of Theresa Brown, Mary Chaney, William Ochs and the late Joseph, Charles, Francis, Vernon and George Ochs, beloved grandfather of 13, great-grandfather of 29 and great-great-grandfather of one. The family will receive...
NEWS
February 27, 2005
On Thursday, February 24, 2005, JAMES ALFRED GAGLIONE, SR., of Glen Burnie, cherished husband of Carolyn Gaglione; beloved father of Pamela Newman, Paula Gatz, James A. Gaglione, Jr, Patricia Garber, and Penny Duncan; loving grandfather of six; dear brother of Gerald Gaglione and the late Charles H. Gaglione and Ann C. Marino. The family will receive visitors at the Singleton Funeral Home, P.A., 1 Second Avenue SW, (at Crain Hwy), Glen Burnie, on Thursday from 4 to 8 P.M. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at the Church of The Crucifixion in Glen Burnie on Friday at 11 A.M. Family and friends are invited at Singleton's on Friday morning at 9:30 to proceed to the Church.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2004
As Easter approaches, three East Baltimore churches -- Russian, Ukrainian and Polish -- are among thousands throughout the world preparing for the most momentous dates on the Christian calendar. Beginning today, Good Friday, and continuing through Easter Sunday, the faithful at these churches will observe the Passion, crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus Christ in rituals that have age-old roots and crossed the ocean a century ago when Eastern European immigrants came to the city and settled in tight enclaves.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | March 2, 2004
RARELY IN the more than 10 years I have been writing this column has the response from readers been so swift, so emotional and so overwhelmingly negative as it was to the column I wrote last week on the new film, The Passion of the Christ. In my capacity as a parent and family life columnist, I was asked to see the movie and comment on its suitability for children - especially given the fact that many teachers and pastors planned to take busloads of youngsters to see it. I argued that the sustained violence in Mel Gibson's film, which I found harrowing, made it unsuitable viewing for children younger than 17. I went further, saying I couldn't recommend the movie to anyone, because I felt that the message of Christ's redemptive love was overwhelmed by the graphic violence done against him in The Passion.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | February 25, 2004
IT IS MY TASK to advise parents on the suitability of the new film The Passion of the Christ for children. If you have a busy day planned, you can stop reading now. No. It is not suitable for children. Certainly not children under the age of 17. It has, after all, a well-deserved R rating for violence. But I wouldn't recommended the film to anybody's children, even if they are old enough to have children of their own. Mel Gibson's movie is about the unspeakable cruelty inflicted on a gentle prophet.
NEWS
July 8, 2003
On July 4, 2003, DOLORES R. (nee Wright); beloved wife of the late George F. Johnson, III; dear mother of George F. Johnson, IV, Kim D. Smith, Sharon A. Glacken, Michael J. Johnson and Barbara L. Emrick; daughter of Ruby Dolan; sister of Irene Fleishell and the late Dorothy Dougherty; daughter-in-law of Margaret S. Long; sister-in-law of Patricia Lynch-Warntz. Also survived by eleven grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Friends may call at the family owned George J. Gonce Funeral Home, P.A., 4001 Ritchie Highway, on Monday and Tuesday from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Mass of Christian Burial in the Church of the Crucifixion, 100 Scott Avenue (off B and A Blvd)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | February 22, 2004
Mel Gibson's The Passion of the Christ has yet to open in theaters, and already the opinionated -- many of whom have yet to see the film -- are lining up to take potshots at it. But that's nothing new in Hollywood, especially when it comes to movies that deal with religion. From the early days of cinema, the faithful have always been wary of movies that could expose their beliefs to question, or possibly ridicule. "The notion of blasphemy is very strong in our society," says Robert Sklar, a professor of cinema studies at New York University and author of Movie-Made America: A Cultural History of American Movies.
TOPIC
By Christopher M. Leighton and Rosann M. Catalano and Christopher M. Leighton and Rosann M. Catalano,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 15, 2004
THE DEATH of Jesus occupies a central place in the life of Christian communities around the world. Two billion adherents of the fastest-growing religion in the world wrangle about almost everything under the sun, but they all converge at the foot of the cross and struggle to discern the meaning of one of the most confounding stories ever told. This historic event comes into focus year after year with the season of Lent, and so the decision to release Mel Gibson's film, The Passion of the Christ, on Ash Wednesday (Feb.
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