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Crucifix

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NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | June 23, 1998
This summer, Stephanie Olden of Pigtown goes on trial for destroying Jesus.Her day in court may offer the last chance for resolving a neighborhood feud so heated it seems likely to be seared into urban legend. The tale of how Christ fell in Pigtown involves a 10-foot crucifix, a federal empowerment zone, a vacant lot and a slain barmaid.At the center of the dispute is a mystery: What was in Olden's heart when she walked into the vacant lot last month and pushed the crucifix? The giant cross tumbled over and landed face down, scarring the legs and breaking both arms of the plaster Jesus statue that had been nailed to it.For the next 13 days, it rained in Baltimore.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 11, 2011
It was the song "Greensleeves" that drew Shirley Dempsey-Kahn into the Goodwill store that December morning. It reminded her of her first trip to London as a child, with her father, a naval officer, and her mother. She would be returning in January, and she thought to buy herself an extra piece of luggage. The kind with a handle and wheels and an expandable compartment. The kind of suitcase flight attendants favor. In a jumble of luggage in the corner of the store, she found exactly what she wanted: a nearly new Travel Pro carry-on bag. It cost only $8, plus tax. She couldn't believe her luck.
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NEWS
By DAN FESPERMAN and DAN FESPERMAN,Sun Foreign Staff | October 3, 1995
BERLIN -- When the gregariously noisy Volk of Bavaria gather to shout and sing at this time of year, it usually has something to do with one of their two great passions: the foaming beer of Oktoberfest or the Bayern Muenchen soccer team.This fall the fiercest roars have been saved for the sake of religion, with Bavarians vowing loudly and angrily to keep the cross in the classroom.The shouting started last month when Germany's highest court, citing the constitutional separation of church and state, overturned a Bavarian state law requiring that a crucifix be displayed in every school classroom.
NEWS
By Shirley Dempsey-Kahn | September 11, 2011
I am at southside mall just before the big day in December of 2001, my rust-spotted RAV-4 parked in front of Goodwill, when my favorite holiday music starts up over the loudspeaker. "Greensleeves" always brings to mind the first time I heard it. Bagpipes and drums had awakened me in my hotel on my very first trip to London. When I looked out the window, below me marched a small parade of men wearing kilts, and I later learned the tune they played was a somber "Greensleeves. " Today it reminds me that, besides new Christmas tree lights, I could use luggage for my upcoming sixth trip to London, this time with the College of Notre Dame of Maryland.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | September 11, 2011
It was the song "Greensleeves" that drew Shirley Dempsey-Kahn into the Goodwill store that December morning. It reminded her of her first trip to London as a child, with her father, a naval officer, and her mother. She would be returning in January, and she thought to buy herself an extra piece of luggage. The kind with a handle and wheels and an expandable compartment. The kind of suitcase flight attendants favor. In a jumble of luggage in the corner of the store, she found exactly what she wanted: a nearly new Travel Pro carry-on bag. It cost only $8, plus tax. She couldn't believe her luck.
NEWS
By Shirley Dempsey-Kahn | September 11, 2011
I am at southside mall just before the big day in December of 2001, my rust-spotted RAV-4 parked in front of Goodwill, when my favorite holiday music starts up over the loudspeaker. "Greensleeves" always brings to mind the first time I heard it. Bagpipes and drums had awakened me in my hotel on my very first trip to London. When I looked out the window, below me marched a small parade of men wearing kilts, and I later learned the tune they played was a somber "Greensleeves. " Today it reminds me that, besides new Christmas tree lights, I could use luggage for my upcoming sixth trip to London, this time with the College of Notre Dame of Maryland.
NEWS
By DAHLEEN GLANTON and DAHLEEN GLANTON,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 3, 2006
AVE MARIA, Fla. -- America's newest town is rising up in the midst of a dusty tomato field in southwest Florida. And if the Catholics building it have their way, this ultraconservative community with a 65-foot crucifix at its center will be the closest thing to heaven on Earth. They envision a town that adheres to strict religious values, a place devoid of adult bookstores, strip clubs, massage parlors and abortion clinics. At one time they had planned to prohibit the sale of contraceptives at drugstores and to bar X-rated channels from cable television.
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | October 20, 1991
MINNEAPOLIS -- They played a drum -- not a tom-tom. It was a bass drum, the kind every marching band features, and a half-dozen American Indian children were playing traditional songs of their people. Nobody danced. Nobody went hi-yi-yi, hi-yi-yi, like they do in the movies. Just a steady drumbeat and unfamiliar words given from an unfamiliar tongue.The drum was only one beat among many in a weird and fantastic clash of cultures outside the Metrodome yesterday.American Indians had come to protest.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber Mike Littwin of The Sun's sports staff contributed to this article | December 16, 1990
It's called The Box, a sweltering, dimly lit gymnasium with a hard-court floor smudged dark brown, two half-moon-shaped backboards and four brick walls.This is where David Wingate began a basketball journey, reaching each step on a path that stretched from the Cecil-Kirk Recreation Center in East Baltimore, to Dunbar High School, to Georgetown University, to the National Basketball Association.In September, Wingate was on the verge of securing his financial future, coming within 48 hours of signing a three-year,$2.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | November 20, 2001
Right about now, I'd hate to be the person who recently bought up the Baltimore Museum of Art's entire supply of postcards depicting Andres Serrano's notorious Piss Christ. Earlier this month, after a local talk-show host denounced the artist for defiling a sacred image - and the BMA for selling it - a listener went to the museum gift shop and purchased the last 13 Serrano postcards in stock to prevent anyone else from being offended by the controversial photograph. You could call that a form of private censorship, since the person who bought the images did so for the sole purpose of precluding anyone else from seeing them.
NEWS
By DAHLEEN GLANTON and DAHLEEN GLANTON,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 3, 2006
AVE MARIA, Fla. -- America's newest town is rising up in the midst of a dusty tomato field in southwest Florida. And if the Catholics building it have their way, this ultraconservative community with a 65-foot crucifix at its center will be the closest thing to heaven on Earth. They envision a town that adheres to strict religious values, a place devoid of adult bookstores, strip clubs, massage parlors and abortion clinics. At one time they had planned to prohibit the sale of contraceptives at drugstores and to bar X-rated channels from cable television.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | November 20, 2001
Right about now, I'd hate to be the person who recently bought up the Baltimore Museum of Art's entire supply of postcards depicting Andres Serrano's notorious Piss Christ. Earlier this month, after a local talk-show host denounced the artist for defiling a sacred image - and the BMA for selling it - a listener went to the museum gift shop and purchased the last 13 Serrano postcards in stock to prevent anyone else from being offended by the controversial photograph. You could call that a form of private censorship, since the person who bought the images did so for the sole purpose of precluding anyone else from seeing them.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | June 23, 1998
This summer, Stephanie Olden of Pigtown goes on trial for destroying Jesus.Her day in court may offer the last chance for resolving a neighborhood feud so heated it seems likely to be seared into urban legend. The tale of how Christ fell in Pigtown involves a 10-foot crucifix, a federal empowerment zone, a vacant lot and a slain barmaid.At the center of the dispute is a mystery: What was in Olden's heart when she walked into the vacant lot last month and pushed the crucifix? The giant cross tumbled over and landed face down, scarring the legs and breaking both arms of the plaster Jesus statue that had been nailed to it.For the next 13 days, it rained in Baltimore.
NEWS
By DAN FESPERMAN and DAN FESPERMAN,Sun Foreign Staff | October 3, 1995
BERLIN -- When the gregariously noisy Volk of Bavaria gather to shout and sing at this time of year, it usually has something to do with one of their two great passions: the foaming beer of Oktoberfest or the Bayern Muenchen soccer team.This fall the fiercest roars have been saved for the sake of religion, with Bavarians vowing loudly and angrily to keep the cross in the classroom.The shouting started last month when Germany's highest court, citing the constitutional separation of church and state, overturned a Bavarian state law requiring that a crucifix be displayed in every school classroom.
SPORTS
By MIKE LITTWIN | October 20, 1991
MINNEAPOLIS -- They played a drum -- not a tom-tom. It was a bass drum, the kind every marching band features, and a half-dozen American Indian children were playing traditional songs of their people. Nobody danced. Nobody went hi-yi-yi, hi-yi-yi, like they do in the movies. Just a steady drumbeat and unfamiliar words given from an unfamiliar tongue.The drum was only one beat among many in a weird and fantastic clash of cultures outside the Metrodome yesterday.American Indians had come to protest.
NEWS
December 19, 2009
A 27-year-old Baltimore man was sentenced to a combined 40 years in prison Friday for attempted murder and related convictions. According to the Baltimore state's attorney's office, Markez Davis of the 2400 block of S. Paca St. shot a man twice in the head in 2007 while robbing him of $23, a cell phone and a gold crucifix on a chain. The defendant's mother later pawned the jewelry. - Tricia Bishop
ENTERTAINMENT
By Simon Habtemariam | October 7, 2011
The Gang learned a key life lesson tonight: Democracy is hard. First of all, Dee is getting audited; but like most things related to Sweet Dee, nobody cares. The writers even made her the subplot, although this week's plot was already pretty thin to begin with. Dennis, Mac and Charlie decide they want a democratic system to resolve issues in Bar Policy. This would throw out the time honored tradition of long, drawn-out arguments followed by allowing Frank to make bad decisions on behalf of them all. Reason Will Prevail: This week's attempt at a memorable one-liner fell very short.
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