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Cruciferous Vegetables

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NEWS
By Dan Berger | September 17, 1997
If that stealth fighter had crashed on a training mission over the Persian Gulf, we would be at war with Iran by now.Parking in downtown Baltimore is worse than in Kansas City but not so bad as D.C. Surprised, anyone?Scientists at the Hopkins have demonstrated that cruciferous vegetables are good for you, which grandmothers have always known.Eric Davis for Governor!Pub Date: 9/17/97
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NEWS
By JULIE BELL and JULIE BELL,SUN REPORTER | November 1, 2005
No one has proved that garlic wards off evil spirits, but scientists meeting here on Halloween presented new evidence that it might play a role in preventing cancer. They also heard the latest findings suggesting that a diet rich in broccoli sprouts could reduce your chances of getting gastric cancer. Want another way to cut your risk of breast cancer? Consider three servings a week of raw or lightly cooked sauerkraut and cabbage. It's too early to say what all this means; scientists say much more research on diet and cancer is needed.
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FEATURES
By Nancy Byal and Nancy Byal,Better Homes and Gardens Magazine | March 13, 1991
Eating cabbage on St. Patrick's Day may bring you more than good luck. Researchers can't give specific recommendations, but one serving a week of cruciferous vegetables appears to provide some protection against colon cancer.Cruciferous (pronounced crew-SIF-er-us) is the scientific name for vegetables from the cabbage family, including cabbage, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, rutabaga, kale and turnips. Because of the good things these vegetables provide, try to eat cabbage or a member of its family at least once a week.
FEATURES
By Russ Parsons and Russ Parsons,los angeles times | March 24, 1999
Brussels sprouts are never going to win any popularity contests. They're the weak member of the vegetable pack, the one everyone likes to pick on. Brussels sprouts are weird-looking, like miniature cabbages. Maybe that's why they're usually shoved away in some dark corner of the produce market. Unlike broccoli, which is also weird-looking but seems to be in your face every time you turn around, they'll never gain acceptance merely through familiarity.What's more, brussels sprouts are ugly and they smell bad.Well, that's not exactly accurate.
NEWS
By ANN EGERTON | April 8, 1992
Let me get this straight, I'm to take calcium pills to ward off osteoporosis, Vitamin E to ''maybe'' avoid breast cancer and subdue my hot flashes, and I'm to exercise regularly for cardiovascular fitness and toned muscles. I'm, of course, to not smoke, drink alcohol in moderation if at all, cut back on red meat and eat plenty of fruit and vegetables.Now I learn that I'm to take regular doses of broccoli to dodge cancer altogether. This is just one more piece of evidence that demonstrates that adulthood is far more full of rules and regulations than childhood ever way.A recent Johns Hopkins study confirmed and added to old news about broccoli and its cousins in the crucifer family -- cabbage, cauliflower and the much maligned Brussels sprout, all part of the Brassica genus.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | November 22, 1994
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center have identified a genetic change occurring during a man's lifetime that appears to trigger prostate cancer by knocking out a cell's ability to resist cancer-causing chemicals in the environment.Although further research is needed to determine the discovery's full significance, scientists yesterday said the finding may provide an important step toward understanding what causes the most frequently diagnosed cancer among American men.The scientists noticed the genetic change while studying 91 human prostate cancers -- tissues obtained from autopsies and biopsies of men who suffered from the disease.
FEATURES
By McClatchy News Service | March 22, 1992
Your mother always told you to eat your vegetables, and now you know she was right -- especially since the report just issued in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal.Essentially, researchers now believe that a chemical prevalent in cruciferous vegetables -- a family that includes broccoli, cauliflower, kale, Brussels sprouts and greens (collards, turnips, mustard, etc.) -- could increase the production of sulforaphane, an enzyme known to put the whammy on carcinogens.
NEWS
By JULIE BELL and JULIE BELL,SUN REPORTER | November 1, 2005
No one has proved that garlic wards off evil spirits, but scientists meeting here on Halloween presented new evidence that it might play a role in preventing cancer. They also heard the latest findings suggesting that a diet rich in broccoli sprouts could reduce your chances of getting gastric cancer. Want another way to cut your risk of breast cancer? Consider three servings a week of raw or lightly cooked sauerkraut and cabbage. It's too early to say what all this means; scientists say much more research on diet and cancer is needed.
FEATURES
By Russ Parsons and Russ Parsons,los angeles times | March 24, 1999
Brussels sprouts are never going to win any popularity contests. They're the weak member of the vegetable pack, the one everyone likes to pick on. Brussels sprouts are weird-looking, like miniature cabbages. Maybe that's why they're usually shoved away in some dark corner of the produce market. Unlike broccoli, which is also weird-looking but seems to be in your face every time you turn around, they'll never gain acceptance merely through familiarity.What's more, brussels sprouts are ugly and they smell bad.Well, that's not exactly accurate.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | March 15, 1992
In a discovery that should delight mothers everywhere, a team of Johns Hopkins researchers has isolated a potent chemical found in broccoli and related vegetables that appears to boost the cancer-fighting abilities of human and animal cells.And the news gets better. Researchers believe that the natural compound may not be particular about the types of cancer it prevents -- possibly guarding against colon and prostate cancers as well as the breast cancers that strike post-menopausal women.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | September 17, 1997
If that stealth fighter had crashed on a training mission over the Persian Gulf, we would be at war with Iran by now.Parking in downtown Baltimore is worse than in Kansas City but not so bad as D.C. Surprised, anyone?Scientists at the Hopkins have demonstrated that cruciferous vegetables are good for you, which grandmothers have always known.Eric Davis for Governor!Pub Date: 9/17/97
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 1, 1997
Throughout my childhood summers, a crop of cucumbers dangled from my grandmother's fence. Even when I was a toddler, a pick-your-own trip to her back yard was the highlight of any visit. I could wash and eat that cuke, skin and all, while it was still sun-warm and juicy.I've been a cucumber addict ever since.For me, cucumbers make a salad. Their sweet, delicate flavor eased my transition from iceberg to the stronger-flavored salad greens.And when my parents' garden produced fresh cucumbers, our family indulged in a delicious, fat-free, simple-to-make cucumber and onion salad:Peel and thinly-slice any available cucumbers.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun Staff Writer | November 22, 1994
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center have identified a genetic change occurring during a man's lifetime that appears to trigger prostate cancer by knocking out a cell's ability to resist cancer-causing chemicals in the environment.Although further research is needed to determine the discovery's full significance, scientists yesterday said the finding may provide an important step toward understanding what causes the most frequently diagnosed cancer among American men.The scientists noticed the genetic change while studying 91 human prostate cancers -- tissues obtained from autopsies and biopsies of men who suffered from the disease.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | April 14, 1993
Lurking in the soul of every red-blooded American who fondly recalls when carnivorousness was a virtue, and supper wasn't supper without a centerpiece of pork chops or prime rib, lies the frail hope that the recent emphasis on fruits, grains and vegetables, vegetables, vegetables will somehow turn out to be a terrible mistake.The time has come to relinquish that hope and give it a proper burial.The truth is that the more researchers understand about the ingredients found in fruits, vegetables, beans and herbs, the more impressed they are with the power of those compounds to retard the bodily breakdown that results in cancer and other chronic diseases.
NEWS
By ANN EGERTON | April 8, 1992
Let me get this straight, I'm to take calcium pills to ward off osteoporosis, Vitamin E to ''maybe'' avoid breast cancer and subdue my hot flashes, and I'm to exercise regularly for cardiovascular fitness and toned muscles. I'm, of course, to not smoke, drink alcohol in moderation if at all, cut back on red meat and eat plenty of fruit and vegetables.Now I learn that I'm to take regular doses of broccoli to dodge cancer altogether. This is just one more piece of evidence that demonstrates that adulthood is far more full of rules and regulations than childhood ever way.A recent Johns Hopkins study confirmed and added to old news about broccoli and its cousins in the crucifer family -- cabbage, cauliflower and the much maligned Brussels sprout, all part of the Brassica genus.
FEATURES
By McClatchy News Service | March 22, 1992
Your mother always told you to eat your vegetables, and now you know she was right -- especially since the report just issued in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal.Essentially, researchers now believe that a chemical prevalent in cruciferous vegetables -- a family that includes broccoli, cauliflower, kale, Brussels sprouts and greens (collards, turnips, mustard, etc.) -- could increase the production of sulforaphane, an enzyme known to put the whammy on carcinogens.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 1, 1997
Throughout my childhood summers, a crop of cucumbers dangled from my grandmother's fence. Even when I was a toddler, a pick-your-own trip to her back yard was the highlight of any visit. I could wash and eat that cuke, skin and all, while it was still sun-warm and juicy.I've been a cucumber addict ever since.For me, cucumbers make a salad. Their sweet, delicate flavor eased my transition from iceberg to the stronger-flavored salad greens.And when my parents' garden produced fresh cucumbers, our family indulged in a delicious, fat-free, simple-to-make cucumber and onion salad:Peel and thinly-slice any available cucumbers.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | April 14, 1993
Lurking in the soul of every red-blooded American who fondly recalls when carnivorousness was a virtue, and supper wasn't supper without a centerpiece of pork chops or prime rib, lies the frail hope that the recent emphasis on fruits, grains and vegetables, vegetables, vegetables will somehow turn out to be a terrible mistake.The time has come to relinquish that hope and give it a proper burial.The truth is that the more researchers understand about the ingredients found in fruits, vegetables, beans and herbs, the more impressed they are with the power of those compounds to retard the bodily breakdown that results in cancer and other chronic diseases.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | March 15, 1992
In a discovery that should delight mothers everywhere, a team of Johns Hopkins researchers has isolated a potent chemical found in broccoli and related vegetables that appears to boost the cancer-fighting abilities of human and animal cells.And the news gets better. Researchers believe that the natural compound may not be particular about the types of cancer it prevents -- possibly guarding against colon and prostate cancers as well as the breast cancers that strike post-menopausal women.
FEATURES
By Nancy Byal and Nancy Byal,Better Homes and Gardens Magazine | March 13, 1991
Eating cabbage on St. Patrick's Day may bring you more than good luck. Researchers can't give specific recommendations, but one serving a week of cruciferous vegetables appears to provide some protection against colon cancer.Cruciferous (pronounced crew-SIF-er-us) is the scientific name for vegetables from the cabbage family, including cabbage, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, rutabaga, kale and turnips. Because of the good things these vegetables provide, try to eat cabbage or a member of its family at least once a week.
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