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By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2004
Scientists at the Johns Hopkins University say they've found that a protein used to predict heart disease may also be a warning sign for colon cancer, a disease that afflicts 150,000 Americans and kills 50,000 annually. High levels of C-reactive protein, or CRP, in a patient's blood "could become a very good early marker" for predicting the colon disorder, said Northwestern University cancer specialist Dr. Boris Pasche. The findings also bolster the theory that inflammation plays a role in some cancers, as well as a host of other chronic ailments, including heart disease and diabetes.
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NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON and JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON,peoplespharmacy.com | December 15, 2008
I received a list of "helpful hints" in an e-mail recently stating that if you have arthritis or joint pain, you should spray WD-40 on it. Could this possibly be true? It seems that it might be more harmful than good. WD-40 is made of petroleum products and is designed to lubricate stiff or squeaky metal hinges or joints. People have tried putting it on their own stiff joints, but we cannot recommend this tactic. There have been reports of people developing chemical pneumonitis, an inflammation of the lungs, after accidentally inhaling WD-40.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 6, 2005
Reducing the levels of a protein secreted by the body during inflammation may be as powerful in slowing heart disease and preventing heart attacks and deaths as lowering cholesterol, two teams of researchers are reporting today. The studies in the New England Journal of Medicine provide the strongest evidence yet for the role of the protein, known as CRP for C-reactive protein, in heart disease. The participants were patients with severe heart disease who were taking high doses of statin drugs, which lower both cholesterol and CRP. Lower CRP levels, the researchers found, were linked to a slower progression of atherosclerosis and fewer heart attacks and deaths.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | July 20, 2008
In a decision that could affect Maryland farmers down the road, a federal judge in Seattle recently issued a temporary injunction that halts cattle grazing and the harvesting of hay from land in a federal conservation program. The legal battle stems from a decision by U.S. Agriculture Secretary Ed Schafer in May to allow cattle and other livestock to graze on 24 million acres of land enrolled in the government's Conservation Reserve Program. He also allowed grass on the land to be harvested as hay. Commonly referred to by agriculture officials and farmers as CRP, the federal program started in 1985 allows landowners to idle environmentally sensitive land for conservation.
NEWS
September 19, 2004
Conservation Reserve Program deadline near Farmers and landowners are reminded that Conservation Reserve Program general sign-up ends Friday at local U.S. Department of Agriculture service centers. Participants with CRP contracts expiring this year and next can make new contract offers and renew their participation in the program. The CRP is designed to improve the nation's natural resource base. Participants voluntarily enter into contracts with USDA to enroll erodible and other environmentally sensitive land in contracts for 10 to 15 years.
NEWS
By DAVID KOHN and DAVID KOHN,SUN REPORTER | October 14, 2005
If medical tests were celebrities, the one that measures the C-reactive protein would be Angelina Jolie: very cool. In recent years, researchers have lauded the test's ability to find otherwise undetected heart disease. But a new study by a University of Maryland cardiologist casts doubt on CRP. The paper, in this week's Archives of Internal Medicine, found that CRP levels were closely tied to known risk factors for heart disease, such as smoking, obesity and hypertension. In other words, the test rarely tells doctors something new. "The reason you're likely to have high CRP is because you have these other risk factors too," said Dr. Michael Miller, the lead author.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON and JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON,peoplespharmacy.com | December 15, 2008
I received a list of "helpful hints" in an e-mail recently stating that if you have arthritis or joint pain, you should spray WD-40 on it. Could this possibly be true? It seems that it might be more harmful than good. WD-40 is made of petroleum products and is designed to lubricate stiff or squeaky metal hinges or joints. People have tried putting it on their own stiff joints, but we cannot recommend this tactic. There have been reports of people developing chemical pneumonitis, an inflammation of the lungs, after accidentally inhaling WD-40.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David L. Haase and David L. Haase,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 15, 1998
Campaign finances, how do I track thee? Let me count the ways:One, CRP.org.Two, FEC Info.That's it.With those two Internet databases, voters in the United States have run out of excuses for not knowing how candidates for federal office finance their campaigns.CRP.org comes from the Center for Responsive Politics, a nonpartisan, nonprofit group that tracks money in federal politics. Larry Makinson, author of the "Price of Admission" books published after each election since 1988, now directs CRP.FEC Info is the brainchild of Tony Raymond, a former computer geek at the Federal Election Commission.
NEWS
By Staff report | July 10, 1991
Provisions for the 11th Conservation Reserve Program sign-up, which runs until July 19, have been announced by Elizabeth A. Schaeffer, county Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation Service director.Schaeffer reminded producers that the sign-up will be their only opportunity to offer bids that will be applicable to the 1992 crop year and that the number of acres accepted based upon these bids will be limited to approximately 1.1 million.Acreage offered for enrollment must be land-planted or consideredplanted to produce an agricultural commodity in two of the five cropyears from 1986 through 1990.
NEWS
By Mary Tillar | February 24, 2008
Over the past month, the Anne Arundel County school system has received many e-mails about the special education program for students with emotional disabilities at Chesapeake High School. Many have expressed concern that students enrolled in the Chesapeake Regional Program (CRP), which operates in a wing at Chesapeake High School, pose a safety danger for students in the high school's general education population. It is evident from recent public comments that misperceptions still exist.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | July 20, 2008
In a decision that could impact Maryland farmers down the road, a federal judge in Seattle recently issued a temporary injunction that halts cattle grazing and the harvesting of hay from land in a federal conservation program. The legal battle stems from a decision by U.S. Agriculture Secretary Ed Schafer in May to allow cattle and other livestock to graze on 24 million acres of land enrolled in the government's Conservation Reserve Program. He also allowed grass on the land to be harvested as hay. Commonly referred to by agriculture officials and farmers as CRP, the federal program started in 1985 allows landowners to idle environmentally sensitive land for conservation.
NEWS
By Mary Tillar | February 24, 2008
Over the past month, the Anne Arundel County school system has received many e-mails about the special education program for students with emotional disabilities at Chesapeake High School. Many have expressed concern that students enrolled in the Chesapeake Regional Program (CRP), which operates in a wing at Chesapeake High School, pose a safety danger for students in the high school's general education population. It is evident from recent public comments that misperceptions still exist.
NEWS
By DAVID KOHN and DAVID KOHN,SUN REPORTER | October 14, 2005
If medical tests were celebrities, the one that measures the C-reactive protein would be Angelina Jolie: very cool. In recent years, researchers have lauded the test's ability to find otherwise undetected heart disease. But a new study by a University of Maryland cardiologist casts doubt on CRP. The paper, in this week's Archives of Internal Medicine, found that CRP levels were closely tied to known risk factors for heart disease, such as smoking, obesity and hypertension. In other words, the test rarely tells doctors something new. "The reason you're likely to have high CRP is because you have these other risk factors too," said Dr. Michael Miller, the lead author.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 6, 2005
Reducing the levels of a protein secreted by the body during inflammation may be as powerful in slowing heart disease and preventing heart attacks and deaths as lowering cholesterol, two teams of researchers are reporting today. The studies in the New England Journal of Medicine provide the strongest evidence yet for the role of the protein, known as CRP for C-reactive protein, in heart disease. The participants were patients with severe heart disease who were taking high doses of statin drugs, which lower both cholesterol and CRP. Lower CRP levels, the researchers found, were linked to a slower progression of atherosclerosis and fewer heart attacks and deaths.
NEWS
September 19, 2004
Conservation Reserve Program deadline near Farmers and landowners are reminded that Conservation Reserve Program general sign-up ends Friday at local U.S. Department of Agriculture service centers. Participants with CRP contracts expiring this year and next can make new contract offers and renew their participation in the program. The CRP is designed to improve the nation's natural resource base. Participants voluntarily enter into contracts with USDA to enroll erodible and other environmentally sensitive land in contracts for 10 to 15 years.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | February 4, 2004
Scientists at the Johns Hopkins University say they've found that a protein used to predict heart disease may also be a warning sign for colon cancer, a disease that afflicts 150,000 Americans and kills 50,000 annually. High levels of C-reactive protein, or CRP, in a patient's blood "could become a very good early marker" for predicting the colon disorder, said Northwestern University cancer specialist Dr. Boris Pasche. The findings also bolster the theory that inflammation plays a role in some cancers, as well as a host of other chronic ailments, including heart disease and diabetes.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | July 20, 2008
In a decision that could affect Maryland farmers down the road, a federal judge in Seattle recently issued a temporary injunction that halts cattle grazing and the harvesting of hay from land in a federal conservation program. The legal battle stems from a decision by U.S. Agriculture Secretary Ed Schafer in May to allow cattle and other livestock to graze on 24 million acres of land enrolled in the government's Conservation Reserve Program. He also allowed grass on the land to be harvested as hay. Commonly referred to by agriculture officials and farmers as CRP, the federal program started in 1985 allows landowners to idle environmentally sensitive land for conservation.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | July 20, 2008
In a decision that could impact Maryland farmers down the road, a federal judge in Seattle recently issued a temporary injunction that halts cattle grazing and the harvesting of hay from land in a federal conservation program. The legal battle stems from a decision by U.S. Agriculture Secretary Ed Schafer in May to allow cattle and other livestock to graze on 24 million acres of land enrolled in the government's Conservation Reserve Program. He also allowed grass on the land to be harvested as hay. Commonly referred to by agriculture officials and farmers as CRP, the federal program started in 1985 allows landowners to idle environmentally sensitive land for conservation.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | February 16, 2003
Heart disease runs in my family. My maternal grandfather died in his 30s of a coronary, and my dad has had bypass surgery. He is now on several medications, most of which have dreadful side effects. Given this history, I am concerned about my own heart. I have heard that there is something new that is better than just a cholesterol test. Could you tell me more about this? The test is for C-reactive protein (CRP). This compound is a marker of inflammation and might be a better predictor of heart disease than standard cholesterol tests.
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