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Crownsville Hospital Center

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By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2013
A group seeking to use the old Crownsville Hospital Center for nonprofit organizations will hold a public meeting on Thursday night. The meeting is planned for 7:30 p.m. at South Shore Elementary School, 1376 Fairfield Loop Road in Crownsville. A group of nonprofits organized as the Community Services Center at Crownsville, Inc. has been working for five years to get permission to use the property. Their goal is to create a campus of groups that offer veterans' services, community services and educational programs.
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NEWS
By Samantha Iacia and For The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
Location: The center of Anne Arundel County, bordered by Millersville to the north, Severna Park and the Severn River to the east, Annapolis to the south and Gambrills to the west. Average property listing price: Current homes for sale in Crownsville reach up to $3,495,000, with the average list price being $798,261, says Melissa Held Marsden, an associate broker for Hoffman Real Estate Inc., based in Crownsville. Population: 1,757 at the time of the 2010 census, says Marsden.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
For years, R. Todd Stevens drove by the old Crownsville Hospital Center and wondered about the closed psychiatric facility. The hospital shut down in 2004, two years before Stevens moved just a couple miles down the road. He was surprised to learn the crumbling brick buildings and white cottages had been full of patients and doctors just a couple years before. "It looked like it had been closed years ago," Stevens said. Finally, his curiosity got the best of him, and Stevens decided this spring to explore the hospital's past by making a documentary.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
For years, R. Todd Stevens drove by the old Crownsville Hospital Center and wondered about the closed psychiatric facility. The hospital shut down in 2004, two years before Stevens moved just a couple miles down the road. He was surprised to learn the crumbling brick buildings and white cottages had been full of patients and doctors just a couple years before. "It looked like it had been closed years ago," Stevens said. Finally, his curiosity got the best of him, and Stevens decided this spring to explore the hospital's past by making a documentary.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2010
Two prominent Republicans joined forces Friday to call for the state to transfer control to Anne Arundel County of a plot of land that houses the closed Crownsville Hospital Center. County Executive John R. Leopold and former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. spoke before a crowd of veterans on the hospital campus to push for Gov. Martin O'Malley to relinquish the 648-acre state-owned complex to the county to revitalize the property. The property houses the county's food bank and other social service programs, but it has mostly been dormant and fallen into disrepair since the hospital closed in 2004.
NEWS
By Samantha Iacia and For The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
Location: The center of Anne Arundel County, bordered by Millersville to the north, Severna Park and the Severn River to the east, Annapolis to the south and Gambrills to the west. Average property listing price: Current homes for sale in Crownsville reach up to $3,495,000, with the average list price being $798,261, says Melissa Held Marsden, an associate broker for Hoffman Real Estate Inc., based in Crownsville. Population: 1,757 at the time of the 2010 census, says Marsden.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 4, 2009
Henrietta E. Hestick, a practicing clinical psychologist specializing in developmental childhood and family issues who was also an associate professor at Baltimore City Community College, died Thursday of a stroke at Sinai Hospital. The longtime Windsor Mill resident was 66. Henrietta Eversley, whose parents were both African Methodist Episcopal ministers, was born and raised in Georgetown, Guyana. After graduating from high school in Georgetown, she taught elementary school from 1959 to 1970 in her hometown.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | August 17, 1994
Embarrassed state officials, conceding that they had been taken in by a "con man," said last night that they have forced the resignation of the head of Crownsville Hospital Center after it was discovered he falsified his resume to include degrees he never earned.Haroon R. Ansari, 33, who was chosen after a national search last year to oversee the 253-bed hospital and its $24 million budget, resigned Monday after being confronted with several "discrepancies" on his resume, said Robert W. Eastridge, deputy secretary of the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2004
After almost a century spent caring for the mentally ill, Crownsville Hospital Center is shutting its doors. Sometime this week, the state hopes to transfer the handful of patients who remain at the hospital -- a move that will complete the closure of the historic, state-run psychiatric complex in Anne Arundel County. The shutdown will leave the state with just two primary residential facilities for the mentally ill: Spring Grove Hospital Center in Baltimore County and Springfield Hospital Center in Carroll County.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2001
In a grove of tall trees shading a gentle slope, the stone slabs are flat on the ground in crooked rows. They vary in size; some are cracked. Most have numbers that appear to have been crudely etched in wet cement with a stick; some have names. Buried here are people once known as the feeble-minded, the idiots, the imbeciles. They died as patients at Crownsville Hospital Center, opened in 1911 as the Hospital for the Negro Insane on 560 acres of farmland in Anne Arundel County. With no sign to mark the burial grounds and no names to identify the dead, the cemetery holds the graves where as many as 3,000 former Crownsville patients were laid to rest before 1957 and largely forgotten.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2013
A group seeking to use the old Crownsville Hospital Center for nonprofit organizations will hold a public meeting on Thursday night. The meeting is planned for 7:30 p.m. at South Shore Elementary School, 1376 Fairfield Loop Road in Crownsville. A group of nonprofits organized as the Community Services Center at Crownsville, Inc. has been working for five years to get permission to use the property. Their goal is to create a campus of groups that offer veterans' services, community services and educational programs.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2010
Two prominent Republicans joined forces Friday to call for the state to transfer control to Anne Arundel County of a plot of land that houses the closed Crownsville Hospital Center. County Executive John R. Leopold and former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. spoke before a crowd of veterans on the hospital campus to push for Gov. Martin O'Malley to relinquish the 648-acre state-owned complex to the county to revitalize the property. The property houses the county's food bank and other social service programs, but it has mostly been dormant and fallen into disrepair since the hospital closed in 2004.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 4, 2009
Henrietta E. Hestick, a practicing clinical psychologist specializing in developmental childhood and family issues who was also an associate professor at Baltimore City Community College, died Thursday of a stroke at Sinai Hospital. The longtime Windsor Mill resident was 66. Henrietta Eversley, whose parents were both African Methodist Episcopal ministers, was born and raised in Georgetown, Guyana. After graduating from high school in Georgetown, she taught elementary school from 1959 to 1970 in her hometown.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2005
The silence in the green grounds and brick buildings at the shuttered Crownsville Hospital Center site, the reservoir at Annapolis-owned Waterworks Park and the nearby Naval Academy dairy farm is nearly unbroken, save for the Academy team mascot -a goat named Bill - who lives in rural splendor. That empty silence, Annapolis Mayor Ellen O. Moyer hopes, will speak volumes to the Maryland Stadium Authority committee, which last week narrowed the field of contenders for the future Maryland State Horse Park site to two: the state capital and Cecil County.
NEWS
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2004
After almost a century spent caring for the mentally ill, Crownsville Hospital Center is shutting its doors. Sometime this week, the state hopes to transfer the handful of patients who remain at the hospital -- a move that will complete the closure of the historic, state-run psychiatric complex in Anne Arundel County. The shutdown will leave the state with just two primary residential facilities for the mentally ill: Spring Grove Hospital Center in Baltimore County and Springfield Hospital Center in Carroll County.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | January 31, 2004
For 89 years Neo Hackett was missing, buried in a hillside cemetery of anonymous graves where the only regular visitors are the wind, the autumn leaves and the man who mows the lawn. No one knew he was there. No one was looking for him. But nearly three years ago, historian Janice Hayes-Williams set out to find the names of hundreds of African-American men and women sent to the state's psychiatric hospital in Crownsville - and eventually buried there in numbered, nameless graves. She didn't know whether it was an impossible task, and she started in no particular hurry.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2003
Remnants of Crownsville Hospital Center's past are spread across the mental health institution's expansive campus in north Anne Arundel County. Under the blue carpet and 10 pews in the hospital's chapel is a slat-wood floor from when the chapel was a potato barn. Across a gravel path is a building with a collapsed wood roof and crooked weather vane. It once was the hospital's livestock barn, where workers slaughtered animals for food. In the kitchen, among the lines of cooking pots affixed to the tile floor, is a 150-gallon vat. All the hospital's steam kettles used to be that big -- they were needed to cook for nearly 3,000 detainees at the facility's peak.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2005
The silence in the green grounds and brick buildings at the shuttered Crownsville Hospital Center site, the reservoir at Annapolis-owned Waterworks Park and the nearby Naval Academy dairy farm is nearly unbroken, save for the Academy team mascot -a goat named Bill - who lives in rural splendor. That empty silence, Annapolis Mayor Ellen O. Moyer hopes, will speak volumes to the Maryland Stadium Authority committee, which last week narrowed the field of contenders for the future Maryland State Horse Park site to two: the state capital and Cecil County.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2003
Remnants of Crownsville Hospital Center's past are spread across the mental health institution's expansive campus in north Anne Arundel County. Under the blue carpet and 10 pews in the hospital's chapel is a slat-wood floor from when the chapel was a potato barn. Across a gravel path is a building with a collapsed wood roof and crooked weather vane. It once was the hospital's livestock barn, where workers slaughtered animals for food. In the kitchen, among the lines of cooking pots affixed to the tile floor, is a 150-gallon vat. All the hospital's steam kettles used to be that big -- they were needed to cook for nearly 3,000 detainees at the facility's peak.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2001
In a grove of tall trees shading a gentle slope, the stone slabs are flat on the ground in crooked rows. They vary in size; some are cracked. Most have numbers that appear to have been crudely etched in wet cement with a stick; some have names. Buried here are people once known as the feeble-minded, the idiots, the imbeciles. They died as patients at Crownsville Hospital Center, opened in 1911 as the Hospital for the Negro Insane on 560 acres of farmland in Anne Arundel County. With no sign to mark the burial grounds and no names to identify the dead, the cemetery holds the graves where as many as 3,000 former Crownsville patients were laid to rest before 1957 and largely forgotten.
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