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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 2, 2001
In a wholesale killing of royalty not seen since the deaths of the last Czar of Russia and his family in 1918, the King of Nepal and at least a dozen relatives were reported shot to death in their palace in Katmandu over dinner last night. Early reports were sketchy and contradictory. The Associated Press said that Crown Prince Dipendra, a 30-year-old graduate of Eton College in England, opened fire, killing his parents, King Birendra Bir Birkram Shah Dev and Queen Aiswarya, and the other royal family members before shooting himself.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 2, 2005
CAIRO, Egypt - In a region that is increasingly defined by instability, the Saudi royal family moved promptly and assuredly yesterday to project an image of certainty, for the benefit of both domestic and international stability. At the same time that it was announced that King Fahd had died, Crown Prince Abdullah was declared the new monarch, and the Saudi defense minister, Prince Sultan, was named the new crown prince. Within three days of the announcement, a funeral and ceremony to declare loyalty to the new king is to be completed.
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NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 25, 2002
WASHINGTON - Amid grievances on both sides, President Bush will welcome one of America's most powerful Middle East allies to his Crawford, Texas, ranch today in hopes that discussions in a relaxed setting will bridge a widening rift between the United States and the Arab world. The visit of Crown Prince Abdullah of Saudi Arabia offers Bush a possible vehicle for seeking an end to the 19-month guerrilla war between Israelis and Palestinians. Bush has praised a peace proposal by Prince Abdullah, adopted last month by the Arab League, that offers Israel normal relations with the Arab world in return for a full withdrawal from land that the Jewish state occupied during the 1967 Arab-Israeli war. But today's meeting comes against the backdrop of widespread Arab anger over U.S. support for Israel and mounting resentment in the United States over a failure by Arab leaders to condemn and combat terrorism against Israelis.
NEWS
By David Lamb and Doyle McManus and David Lamb and Doyle McManus,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 2, 2005
King Fahd of Saudi Arabia, who led his desert kingdom into a controversial military alliance with the United States that produced a violent backlash by Islamic fundamentalists, died yesterday at the King Faisal Specialist Hospital in Riyadh, the Saudi capital. He was believed to be 84. Crown Prince Abdullah, the king's half-brother and the effective leader of the kingdom since the mid-1990s when a stroke incapacitated the king, was chosen by the royal family to succeed him. King Fahd's funeral is scheduled today in Riyadh.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Sun Foreign Staff | February 7, 1999
AMMAN, Jordan -- As King Hussein lay dying in the hospital, Jordan's Cabinet declared the region's longest-ruling monarch incapable of performing his duties and named his eldest son and heir to lead the desert kingdom.The resolution by Jordan's ministerial council appointed Crown Prince Abdullah regent, giving him all the powers and authority invested in a king. The move began the transition of power that has been expected since Hussein suffered a relapse of lymphatic cancer and a second bone marrow transplant failed.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 26, 1999
AMMAN, Jordan -- While many in his kingdom slept, King Hussein of Jordan confirmed early today his much rumored decision to replace his brother Hassan as heir to the throne with the monarch's oldest son, Abdullah.The announcement came in a one-paragraph royal decree read on Jordanian television at about 12: 50 a.m. The decree named the king's 36-year-old son as crown prince, the title held for 33 years by Hussein's younger brother, Hassan.Prince Abdullah, married and the father of two, is an Army major general who heads an elite palace security force.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 28, 1999
AMMAN, Jordan -- Hundreds of well-wishers gathered to greet Jordan's new Crown Prince Abdullah yesterday, even as his father was back in an American hospital undergoing treatment for cancer.The turnout signified a collective embrace of King Hussein's decision to name his eldest son to replace the monarch's brother, Prince Hassan, who had held the post for 33 years.Among yesterday's well-wishers was the ousted crown prince."May you be successful, God willing," a smiling Prince Hassan told his nephew.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | February 20, 2002
RIYADH, Saudi Arabia - Earlier this month, I wrote a column suggesting that the 22 members of the Arab League, at their summit in Beirut on March 27 and 28, make a simple, clear-cut proposal to Israel to break the Israeli-Palestinian impasse: In return for a total withdrawal by Israel to the June 4, 1967, lines, and the establishment of a Palestinian state, the 22 members of the Arab League would offer Israel full diplomatic relations, normalized trade...
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 31, 1999
AMMAN, Jordan -- In the end, the future of Jordan's monarchy turned not on a father's love for a favored son, but a king's recognition of his own mortality.The succession saga that has preoccupied this desert kingdom climaxed with a surprising announcement made by King Hussein upon his return from a six-month stay in an American hospital for treatment of lymphatic cancer.The ailing Hussein removed his brother as heir and appointed his first son to succeed him on the throne. In most royal dramas that would seem logical enough.
NEWS
By Leslie Helm and Leslie Helm,Los Angeles Times | January 7, 1993
TOKYO -- The long search ended yesterday: Crown Prince Naruhito, 32, has picked a bride. Japan's future empress is a Harvard University graduate and rising star in the Foreign Ministry.Masako Owada, 29, the eldest daughter of Vice Foreign Minister Hisashi Owada, is fluent in four languages and is widely seen as an important future asset to promoting smooth Japanese ties with the rest of the world.The happy news dominated Japanese television last night, breaking through the pall of economic gloom that has fallen over Japan this new year.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 17, 2003
WASHINGTON - Saudi Arabia is beginning to take a more open look at its society "at every level," including religion, to prevent the further recruitment of terrorists like the perpetrators of Monday's deadly car bomb attacks in the capital, Riyadh, a senior Saudi official said yesterday. With Saudis reeling from what he called the "massive jolt" of suicide attacks that killed 34 people, including eight Americans, the official, Adel al-Jubeir, said the kingdom needs to press on with reforms in its economy, education system and job market to "immunize" its young people from the hate-driven, anti-modernist message of al-Qaida, the network that U.S. and Saudi officials believe was behind the bombings.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2002
How badly does Prince Ahmed bin Salman, the owner of Kentucky Derby and Preakness winner War Emblem, want the Triple Crown? "As badly as I want my son and daughter to get married," said Prince Ahmed, member of the Saudi Arabian ruling family. "Really bad. ... To win the Triple Crown would knock me out." Prince Ahmed - like the trainer who works for him, Bob Baffert - can practically taste a Triple Crown, partly because of disappointments that have come before. Prince Ahmed, 43, and Baffert were close last year with Point Given, the 2001 Horse of the Year.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 29, 2002
WASHINGTON - When Secretary of State Colin Powell was asked point-blank on Fox News a week ago whether he shared President Bush's assessment of Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon as "a man of peace," he bobbed and weaved like a rope-a-doping Muhammad Ali. The secretary cited "many conversations" with Mr. Sharon in which the Israeli leader said "he remains committed to negotiations that will lead to a Palestinian state. And so, in that regard," Mr. Powell said, "he knows that a political solution is necessary and peace must be made."
NEWS
April 28, 2002
GEORGE W. Bush heads the most powerful democracy in the world. Crown Prince Abdullah is the de facto ruler of the wealthiest oil kingdom on the planet. And yet, when it comes to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, neither has been willing to use his considerable power to exact a change in the corrosive situation there. Mr. Bush may have forged a "strong personal bond" with the Saudi prince during the monarch's visit Thursday to the president's Texas ranch. And the two may have reaffirmed their "shared vision" of a two-state solution to the Middle East problem.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and Mark Matthews and David L. Greene and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 26, 2002
CRAWFORD, Texas - President Bush said yesterday that he had formed a "strong personal bond" in a meeting with Crown Prince Abdullah of Saudi Arabia, working to mend a relationship with a crucial Middle East ally that has been marred by disagreements over the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. At the same time, the president suggested that Saudi Arabia must do more to help prevent Palestinian suicide attacks if peace is to be achieved. "America can't do it alone," Bush said after meeting for nearly five hours with the crown prince at his Texas ranch.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 25, 2002
WACO, Texas - President Bush is welcoming the crown prince of Saudi Arabia to his ranch today. It is not so the Saudi leader can sample the Texas weather. Like many presidents before him, Bush has calculated that one of the best ways to smooth relations with another foreign leader is to escape the formal trappings of Washington and bring the leader to some casual place out of town to chat. The normally warm U.S.-Saudi relationship has fallen to its tensest point in some time, and Crown Prince Abdullah, who will arrive at Bush's 1,600-acre ranch this morning, brings with him an angry message from moderate Arab leaders: If they are to remain American allies, Bush must exert more pressure on Israel to pull out of the West Bank.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 18, 2002
DOHA, Qatar - Stepping up the United States' diplomatic involvement in the Middle East, President Bush has invited Crown Prince Abdullah of Saudi Arabia to his ranch in Texas for top-level talks. Vice President Dick Cheney delivered the invitation in a meeting Saturday night with the crown prince in Jidda, Saudi Arabia. Yesterday, the Saudis announced that they had accepted. The meeting is expected this spring. Bush's invitation is the latest indication of the deepening U.S. involvement in Middle East diplomacy.
NEWS
By David Lamb and Doyle McManus and David Lamb and Doyle McManus,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 2, 2005
King Fahd of Saudi Arabia, who led his desert kingdom into a controversial military alliance with the United States that produced a violent backlash by Islamic fundamentalists, died yesterday at the King Faisal Specialist Hospital in Riyadh, the Saudi capital. He was believed to be 84. Crown Prince Abdullah, the king's half-brother and the effective leader of the kingdom since the mid-1990s when a stroke incapacitated the king, was chosen by the royal family to succeed him. King Fahd's funeral is scheduled today in Riyadh.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 25, 2002
WASHINGTON - Amid grievances on both sides, President Bush will welcome one of America's most powerful Middle East allies to his Crawford, Texas, ranch today in hopes that discussions in a relaxed setting will bridge a widening rift between the United States and the Arab world. The visit of Crown Prince Abdullah of Saudi Arabia offers Bush a possible vehicle for seeking an end to the 19-month guerrilla war between Israelis and Palestinians. Bush has praised a peace proposal by Prince Abdullah, adopted last month by the Arab League, that offers Israel normal relations with the Arab world in return for a full withdrawal from land that the Jewish state occupied during the 1967 Arab-Israeli war. But today's meeting comes against the backdrop of widespread Arab anger over U.S. support for Israel and mounting resentment in the United States over a failure by Arab leaders to condemn and combat terrorism against Israelis.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 18, 2002
DOHA, Qatar - Stepping up the United States' diplomatic involvement in the Middle East, President Bush has invited Crown Prince Abdullah of Saudi Arabia to his ranch in Texas for top-level talks. Vice President Dick Cheney delivered the invitation in a meeting Saturday night with the crown prince in Jidda, Saudi Arabia. Yesterday, the Saudis announced that they had accepted. The meeting is expected this spring. Bush's invitation is the latest indication of the deepening U.S. involvement in Middle East diplomacy.
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