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By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Sun | May 24, 2009
As Isabella Litchka awaits her husband's return from a business trip, she puts the finishing touches on a home project she has been working on in his absence - the placement of crown molding running along the base of the first-to-second-floor staircase. "I can't wait until my husband comes home and sees [this]," said the 57-year old, semi-retired teacher. It is not that she is refurbishing an old home. On the contrary, she and her husband, Peter Litchka, a professor at Loyola College, purchased their new three-story town house in the northern Baltimore County community of High View just two years ago. Empty nesters for many years, the Litchkas fit the familiar story of downsizing to a smaller home in a community that offers amenities such as lawn maintenance, an outdoor swimming pool, and clubhouse with a gym, cafe, movie theater and rentable party rooms.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Picture a Victorian mansion in move-in condition that could function as a bed-and-breakfast, a home for a growing family, or just a place for anyone hankering for a bygone time. This 19th-century home at 114 Washington Ave. in Chestertown on the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay fits the bill. "What I like best about the house is the enthusiasm with which the owners researched [the home's history] and tried to restore it as authentically as they could," said Terry Stafford, an agent with Keller Williams American Premier Realty LLC and the listing agent for the property, which is priced at $675,000.
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By Michael Walsh and By Michael Walsh,Universal Press Syndicate | May 12, 2002
Pitched, arched, domed, coffered, trussed or beamed, a shapely ceiling can be a refreshing -- and impressive -- alternative to a flat and featureless overhead surface. If you're planning a new home or a major remodel of an old one, incorporating an "articulated" ceiling can add high-altitude drama and substantial architectural interest. But there are several cosmetic ceiling treatment options that require few if any structural changes. Even these seemingly minor improvements can exert a powerful visual influence on a room, and at a relatively low cost.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
The renovated rowhouse at 114 Warren Ave. in Federal Hill combines the best elements of city living, from its views to its desirable location. This three-story brick home, built in 1900, is listed at $875,000. The interior is spacious, measuring more than 3,000 square feet. But perhaps more impressive is what's outside: a a 40-by-15-foot rooftop deck that provides a breathtaking view of the city skyline. At ground level, five steps open onto an entry vestibule with paneled wainscoting, crown molding, a domed ceiling light and marble floor.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | September 9, 1992
I am not a jealous person.Or rather I have never found anyone to be jealous of.When I see a person richer than me, I simply say: He's probably miserable and has ulcers and will end up in prison for tax fraud.When I see a person better looking than me, I simply say: He's probably got three ex-wives and the alimony is killing him.And when I see a person smarter than me . . . well, that has never happened.Ego is a great defense against jealousy. If you feel you are better than everyone else, how can you possibly be jealous of anyone else?
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By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 24, 1994
"How do I give a traditional look to a simple, box-like room with no architectural detail?"Quite possibly, that's the question I'm asked more than any other. Its frequency has to do with, of course, the number of people who now live in exactly those types of spaces.With a little probing, however, I usually find that a "traditional" design -- in the sense of re-creating the look of a historical period -- is really not what's being sought. Most of my clients and readers actually want to make these rooms comfortable, visually as well as physically, and aren't asking advice on any specific style.
FEATURES
By Joanne Cleaver and Joanne Cleaver,McClatchy-Tribune | November 11, 2006
When it was time to take out some walls in the 1960s-era ranch house that Rhett Bainter bought from his parents, he and his friends were the ones who swung the sledgehammers and hauled the mess out to the trash bins. When the tile guy working on the bathroom floor needs someone to hand him a square, Bainter does it. When it's time to paint the kitchen, he'll be the one wielding the brush. "If I'm not working, I'm here helping," said Bainter, 26, of Milwaukee. He's not sure exactly how much he's saving on the $150,000 project, which includes adding central air conditioning, replacing windows and expanding the garage.
NEWS
By Laura Ortiz and Laura Ortiz,McClatchy-Tribune | September 30, 2007
Nancy Smith of Bloomfield Hills, Mich., sometimes shut her eyes to the mess as she passed through the long hallway that connected her garage to her kitchen. It was there that the items of daily activities piled up -- golf and tennis shoes, rackets, jackets, baseball mitts and backpacks. To cleanse the clutter, Smith recently renovated the space into a mudroom -- an upgrade that more new homes feature and one that can add value to existing residences. "We wanted something so the kids could come in the back door and plop their stuff down rather than drag it through the rest of the house," Smith said.
FEATURES
By RITA ST.CLAIR | February 24, 1991
Q: We recently bought an old Victorian-style house. Its living room ceiling is 12 feet high with crown moldings, and the windows are tall and narrow. What little furniture we brought along seems too low-slung for such a space. We're going to buy some new furnishings as well as wallpaper and window coverings, but we need your help in making the right choices.A: Let's start with the walls and window treatments. Right off, I suggest you paint the crown molding and baseboards in a color contrasting to the rest of the wall.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 24, 1994
Q: I would like to install moldings in my living room, but I'm not sure what size and design would look best. Would elaborate moldings be all right in a room with a 9-foot ceiling and a mixture of contemporary and English traditional furniture? Most crown moldings seem to be rather plain and no more than 3 inches in depth.A: A 9-foot ceiling isn't suited for very large moldings, though they can certainly be more than 3 inches deep. And while ornate moldings probably wouldn't be appropriate in the setting you describe, they also don't have to be dull.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
A stone cottage in Baltimore's Homeland neighborhood sold recently for $500,000 in a short sale. The 85-year-old home, with its steeply pitched roof, gables and dormers, sits on a beautifully landscaped quarter of an acre. "The architecture is lovely, with its stone exterior and a screened-in porch in the back," said buyer's agent Ashley Richardson of Long & Foster Real Estate. "The rooms are a good size with high ceilings and easy furniture placement. The house needs some exterior paint, but [the buyers]
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2013
Those shopping for a home on a large lot may be drawn to a Toll Brothers-built, six-bedroom estate on a full acre in Ellicott City. "Compared to other luxury properties in the area, it's stunning in every possible detail," said William J. Ganz III of Exit Results Realty, which is listing the property at $1.35 million. "You walk into the home, it's in excellent condition, and it feels like it was just built yesterday. "Furthermore," Ganz said, "if you're buying this style of home now from Toll Brothers at $1.2 million base price, to get it to look like this one, it would probably cost in excess of another $400,000 for the upgrades, and you'd probably have to wait almost a year to get in. " The 5,641-square-foot house, which is advertised as move in-ready and in excellent condition, features $160,000 in exterior landscaping.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2013
Yesterday's charm and elegance is coupled with 21st-century amenities in the restored four levels of a Dutch colonial in Baltimore's Roland Park neighborhood. A 113-year-old beauty, 16 Elmwood Road has just been listed for $750,000 after a renovation by local developers Barbara Brustein and Tom Kane, complete with all-new electric and plumbing and two-zone air conditioning. "Now, with revitalization and the way we live [today], we want the old charm and character of these houses, but we need the functionality of open living spaces to be able to entertain within one large area," said listing agent Michael Schiff of Keller Williams Realty Baltimore.
NEWS
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2013
With a new addition and dozens of amenities - including space for thousands of bottles of wine - the home at 14123 Mantua Mill Road in Baltimore County stands out. "Brookfield is one of the most compelling properties in Worthington Valley," said Heidi Krauss of Krauss Real Property Brokerage, the listing agent for the property. "[It is] stellar in every way. " The 122-year-old estate in Glyndon recently sold for $3.5 million. The new owners are enjoying close to 9,000 square feet of living space in the traditional home that sits on nearly 33 acres of land cradled in the rolling hills of Maryland's fox-hunting country.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
Selling a house is rarely easy and quick, but the transaction for the three-story end-of-group brick rowhouse at 200 Warren Ave.e in Federal Hill was just that. The property listed and sold simultaneously, closing for $950,000 after being offered at $995,000. Little wonder. The home was built just five years ago in the same architectural style and detail as the older homes around it. Additionally, it is within walking distance to the Inner Harbor and shops and restaurants on Light and Charles streets.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Sun | May 24, 2009
As Isabella Litchka awaits her husband's return from a business trip, she puts the finishing touches on a home project she has been working on in his absence - the placement of crown molding running along the base of the first-to-second-floor staircase. "I can't wait until my husband comes home and sees [this]," said the 57-year old, semi-retired teacher. It is not that she is refurbishing an old home. On the contrary, she and her husband, Peter Litchka, a professor at Loyola College, purchased their new three-story town house in the northern Baltimore County community of High View just two years ago. Empty nesters for many years, the Litchkas fit the familiar story of downsizing to a smaller home in a community that offers amenities such as lawn maintenance, an outdoor swimming pool, and clubhouse with a gym, cafe, movie theater and rentable party rooms.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | November 16, 2008
With the help of their two daughters who work for a Baltimore interior designer, Jon and Margee Zemarel have made their Roland Park house into a showcase since moving in about seven years ago. But, thanks to an abundance of trees and other greenery surrounding the four-bedroom, 31/2-bathroom Colonial house, the outside world has little chance of catching a glimpse. It's easy to drive right by. The house is nestled on a little more than a third of an acre, and the Zemarels have added many outdoor amenities that seem to blend in, such as a two-car garage that was built to match the house built in the 1920s - complete with old windows scavenged from another older building.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Picture a Victorian mansion in move-in condition that could function as a bed-and-breakfast, a home for a growing family, or just a place for anyone hankering for a bygone time. This 19th-century home at 114 Washington Ave. in Chestertown on the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay fits the bill. "What I like best about the house is the enthusiasm with which the owners researched [the home's history] and tried to restore it as authentically as they could," said Terry Stafford, an agent with Keller Williams American Premier Realty LLC and the listing agent for the property, which is priced at $675,000.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,meredith.cohn@baltsun.com | November 16, 2008
With the help of their two daughters who work for a Baltimore interior designer, Jon and Margee Zemarel have made their Roland Park house into a showcase since moving in about seven years ago. But, thanks to an abundance of trees and other greenery surrounding the four-bedroom, 31/2-bathroom Colonial house, the outside world has little chance of catching a glimpse. It's easy to drive right by. The house is nestled on a little more than a third of an acre, and the Zemarels have added many outdoor amenities that seem to blend in, such as a two-car garage that was built to match the house built in the 1920s - complete with old windows scavenged from another older building.
NEWS
By Laura Ortiz and Laura Ortiz,McClatchy-Tribune | September 30, 2007
Nancy Smith of Bloomfield Hills, Mich., sometimes shut her eyes to the mess as she passed through the long hallway that connected her garage to her kitchen. It was there that the items of daily activities piled up -- golf and tennis shoes, rackets, jackets, baseball mitts and backpacks. To cleanse the clutter, Smith recently renovated the space into a mudroom -- an upgrade that more new homes feature and one that can add value to existing residences. "We wanted something so the kids could come in the back door and plop their stuff down rather than drag it through the rest of the house," Smith said.
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