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Jacques Kelly | August 18, 2012
The landmark Eastern Avenue industrial building fooled me. I assumed it was abandoned, and I was wrong. The former Crown Cork and Seal complex in Greektown is a busy workplace for cabinetmakers, musicians, artists and a craft brewer. It's just that nobody puts up a sign on this curiously anonymous post-industrial survivor. The place where food- and beverage-packaging machines once were made remains a bustling village. It houses the studios of two Sondheim Award-winning artists, Tony Shore and Laure Drogoul.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
R. Alonzo "Lonz" Childress, a civil engineer whose career with the Baltimore County Department of Public Works spanned more than 40 years, died Saturday at Johns Hopkins Hospital of complications from an infection. The Taneytown resident was 72. "Lonz was one of the most pragmatic and even-keeled persons that you'd ever meet. He was good at getting to the bottom of problems," said Brian L. Childress, a nephew who is a civil engineer with D.S. Thaler & Associates. "He always maintained a steady course and never got worked up. He could solve engineering problems without ever getting out of sync," said Mr. Childress, who lives in Perry Hall.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2013
Howard Thomas "Has" Sachs, a retired Crown Cork and Seal manager and a coach, died of Alzheimer's disease complications Feb. 24 at Anne Arundel Medical Center. He was 77 and lived in Pasadena. Born in Baltimore and raised on Sidney Avenue in Westport, he was a 1953 graduate of Southern High School, where he earned varsity letters in baseball, football and basketball. Family said he played on the same team as Al Kaline, a Westport friend who went on to play for the Detroit Tigers and is in the National Baseball Hall of Fame.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2013
George R. Frank, a Baltimore businessman, packaging executive and philanthropist, died Friday from congestive heart failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. He was 88. "George was serious, had his principles, knew what he wanted and worked very hard. And he let everyone know that," said Howard A. Kelly, who had been Mr. Frank's vice president of sales. "He was close to everyone, and even though he was the boss, we knew what to do to make the company move. He was just a great entrepreneur," said Mr. Kelly who is retired and lives in Rising Sun. The son of George A. "Buck" Frank Jr., who had worked in the metal can industry and Annella Nicoletti Frank, a homemaker, George Ralph Frank was born in East Rutherford, N.J., in 1925.
BUSINESS
February 11, 1992
Net income for the Philadelphia-based can and bottle-top manufacturer rose in the last quarter of 1991 and for the year because of two major acquisitions, Continental Metal Packaging July 1990 and Continental Can International in May 1991, said Alan W. Rutherford, the company's senior vice president and chief financial officer. Earnings also were boosted by cost-cutting steps begun after merging the new companies into Crown Cork, he said.The company has five operations in Maryland with 675 employees.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | May 23, 1995
Crown Cork & Seal Co. Inc., one of the world's largest makers of aluminum, plastic and tin cans, yesterday announced it has agreed to acquire CarnaudMetalbox, a major European packaging company based in Paris, in a cash and stock deal valued at $5.2 billion.The Philadelphia-based maker of metal cans, bottle tops, and plastic containers said the combination will result in a concern with annual sales of more than $10 billion."We will be the world's premier packaging company, well-positioned to serve customers that include global marketers of a wide range of consumer products," Crown Chairman William Avery said.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,SUN STAFF | September 20, 1995
The stock of Crown Cork & Seal Co. Inc., one of the world's largest makers of aluminum, plastic and tin cans, plummeted 12 percent yesterday after the company said it expects earnings to be worse than last year.With net income expected to be less than $55 million in the last six months of this year, the company said earnings per share for the entire year will probably not reach 1994's level of $2.29 a share, which excluded restructuring charges.This is substantially lower than estimates from stock analysts who had predicted the company would earn between $2.38 and $2.48 a share this year, according to Zacks Investment Research, a firm that tracks earnings estimates.
NEWS
October 13, 1990
Services for James L. Bowen Jr., who retired more than five years ago as plant superintendent for the Crown Cork and Seal Co., will be held at 10 a.m. today at the Liberty Reformed Presbyterian Church, 11301 Liberty Road, Randallstown.Mr. Bowen, who was 71, died Wednesday of cancer at his home in Randallstown.He had worked for Crown Cork and Seal for 37 years and earlier as a machinist for the Glenn L. MartinCo., now Martin Marietta Corp.Born in Baltimore, he attended Forest Park High School and graduated from night school at the Polytechnic Institute.
BUSINESS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | October 26, 1990
Negotiators were scheduled to meet today amid some signs that a settlement may be nearing in the three-week-old strike of 180 employees at Crown Cork & Seal Co.The strike shut down production at Crown's factory on South Newkirk street.Several months of talks between Crown and representatives of Local 1672 of the International Association of Machinists failed to result in an agreement prior to expiration of the previous pact. The three-year contract expired Oct. 7.Workers said the major issues in the dispute are contract changes sought by the company that would allow some work at the plant to be shifted to outside manufacturers.
BUSINESS
By Dow Jones News Service | February 19, 1992
PHILADELPHIA -- Crown Cork & Seal Co. said yesterday that it had terminated its offer to acquire Van Dorn Co. for $20 a share.William J. Avery, Crown's chairman, president and chief executive, said Van Dorn President W. G. Pryor "has refused all attempts to negotiate the terms of a possible transaction or discuss the merits of Crown's proposal."Mr. Avery called the Van Dorn decision "regrettable for all parties." Van Dorn said last week that the company wasn't for sale.Separately, Crown Cork & Seal, which is based in Philadelphia and has operations in Baltimore, said it plans to build a can plant in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, in a joint venture with a Saudi Arabian company.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2013
Howard Thomas "Has" Sachs, a retired Crown Cork and Seal manager and a coach, died of Alzheimer's disease complications Feb. 24 at Anne Arundel Medical Center. He was 77 and lived in Pasadena. Born in Baltimore and raised on Sidney Avenue in Westport, he was a 1953 graduate of Southern High School, where he earned varsity letters in baseball, football and basketball. Family said he played on the same team as Al Kaline, a Westport friend who went on to play for the Detroit Tigers and is in the National Baseball Hall of Fame.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2012
Charles E. McManus Jr., a retired Crown Cork and Seal Co. executive and longtime Towson resident, died Thursday of heart failure at St. Joseph Medical Center. He was 98. The son of the chairman of Crown Cork and Seal Co. and a homemaker, Charles Edward McManus Jr. was born and raised in New York City, and also raised in Spring Lake, N.J. He was a 1932 graduate of the old Barnard School for Boys in New York City and earned a bachelor's degree in 1936 from Bard College. After college, Mr. McManus went to work for Crown Cork and Seal Co. in its machine shop.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | August 18, 2012
The landmark Eastern Avenue industrial building fooled me. I assumed it was abandoned, and I was wrong. The former Crown Cork and Seal complex in Greektown is a busy workplace for cabinetmakers, musicians, artists and a craft brewer. It's just that nobody puts up a sign on this curiously anonymous post-industrial survivor. The place where food- and beverage-packaging machines once were made remains a bustling village. It houses the studios of two Sondheim Award-winning artists, Tony Shore and Laure Drogoul.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | March 30, 2012
You smell damp masonry as you approach the old factory atop the Jones Falls Valley just above downtown Baltimore. The restoration and conversion of the old Lebow Brothers garment manufacturing plant into a new $25 million Baltimore Design School is now five months in the making. Open to the elements since the mid-1980s, it still reeks of abandonment. But that changes by the day. It's a remarkable project in a lightly visited section of the Station North Arts and Entertainment District and the part of Baltimore known as Greenmount West.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 21, 2011
Dennis Livingston, an urban activist who called for jobs creation and a clean environment and who was a pioneer in the Station North Arts District near Green Mount Cemetery, died of cancer Thursday at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 72 and lived on Guilford Avenue. "There were those who came out of the 1960s who lost their vision for social change, but Dennis was not one of them," said Joseph McNeely, director of the Central Baltimore Partnership. "He just stayed there and said we can do better.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | February 2, 2010
Maurice F. Mackey Jr., a retired lawyer who enjoyed writing short stories, fables, poems and even a bachelor's cookbook, died Jan. 26 at his Baldwin home of a brain injury. He was 87. Mr. Mackey, whose father was an Irish immigrant and a Crown Cork & Seal Co. plant superintendent and whose mother was a first-generation Irish homemaker, was born and raised in East Baltimore. He attended Loyola High School until 1937, when he entered the Marianist Preparatory School in Beacon, N.Y., to prepare to be a brother, and Mount St. John High School in Dayton, Ohio.
NEWS
September 6, 2002
Frederick T. Sulka Sr., a retired Crown Cork & Seal Co. supervisor, died Monday of a circulatory ailment at Lookout Manor in Westminster. He was 90 and had lived earlier in Pasadena and Edmondson Village. He retired from the Highlandtown bottle-top plant, where he worked in the closure, cork and can shops for 38 years. Born in Austria, Mr. Sulka came to the United States as an infant with his parents. He attended the old St. Mary's Industrial School on Wilkens Avenue. Years ago, he was a three-time-a-week duckpin bowler on the Crown Cork & Seal team.
BUSINESS
October 15, 1992
Sales at Philadelphia-based Crown Cork & Seal Co. Inc. declined by 2.9 percent in the third quarter as the can and bottle-cap maker passed on a drop in aluminum prices to customers. However, income increased by 23.9 percent as the company continues to benefit from cost savings from acquisitions made in recent years, Alan Rutherford, senior vice president and chief financial officer, said yesterday.Three months ended 9/30/92. ............Revenue. ............... Net................. Share'92.
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