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By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | April 7, 1993
Also, a box listing proposals by the Anne Arundel school system's "Ugly Alternatives" committee on dealing withexpected school crowding omitted the determination that South River High School has enough capacity to handle projected enrollment increases.The Baltimore Sun regrets the errors.Anne Arundel County schools already are so crowded, and will become so much more so in the next seven years, that some may have to resort to extended days, split sessions or year-round schooling.That gloomy conclusion is the work of a committee charged by the Board of Education with heading off what could become a serious crowding problem in the next few years.
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2013
Baltimore County would add classrooms for thousands of students under a budget proposal unveiled Monday by County Executive Kevin Kamenetz - a plan advocates hope signals a commitment to solve the overcrowding that has plagued the school system. "There's an acknowledgment of the number of seats needed, and there seems to be the will to fund the additional seats," said Yara Cheikh, president of the PTA at Hampton Elementary School in Towson, the county's most overcrowded school. Kamenetz's proposal includes a $2.8 billion operating budget and a $339 million capital budget.
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NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1996
With every home constructed west of Interstate 97, the question of what to do with children that will be added to some already crowded schools grows more complex.Meanwhile, parents in Crofton and neighboring communities have lobbied for years for a west county high school. But in those communities, there aren't enough students to support a new high school and won't be, even by 2003, the year the school board estimates it could be built.County Executive John G. Gary has suggested the board redraw school attendance boundaries so students in crowded schools are transferred to schools where there are places.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2010
Parents and teachers at Hampton Elementary School are asking Baltimore County officials to make an addition to the crowded building the highest priority for school construction dollars next year. Dozens jammed the county school board meeting Tuesday night to demand relief for the system's most crowded school, which they said would be more than 80 percent over capacity next year. Superintendent Joe A. Hairston is expected to ask the school board to vote on the county's capital request on Jan. 11. A request will then go to County Executive Kevin B. Kamenetz.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | February 11, 2007
Building homes near crowded schools will be tougher to do in Harford County, especially in areas near Bel Air where portable classrooms surround most schools. The County Council unanimously passed a measure last week that strengthens the adequate public facilities law, which limits home construction where infrastructure is burdened. The momentum for the legislation comes largely in response to parents concerned with crowded classrooms. Under the former law, home building could proceed in an area with crowded schools if a new school was in the planning stages.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | March 25, 1998
The school board won't stop sending children from new subdivisions to crowded schools and won't approve redistricting, frustrated county administration officials said yesterday.So County Executive John G. Gary wants to try something different, having county planners stop approving subdivisions where schools are crowded."It's keeping children from going to an overcrowded school. If the result of that is less subdivisions, that's an economic shame for the county," said Ronald Nelson, county land-use and environment officer.
NEWS
June 19, 1998
CROWDED SCHOOLS are not the rule in Anne Arundel County, but in a number of elementary schools, enrollment far exceeds capacity.On Monday, the County Council wisely decided that halting subdivision approvals this year is not the answer.A broad-brush solution wouldn't work. Indeed, some elementary schools in Anne Arundel have ample space.Stopping building in those neighborhoods would be senseless. Yet slowing subdivisions temporarily may be precisely the answer in other communities such as Davidsonville, Odenton and Jacobsville, where schools are crowded with students.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 25, 1996
Baltimore County is moving to end the controversial 6-year-old law that bans home construction near crowded elementary schools.A County Council-appointed committee narrowly agreed this week to recommend that the law be allowed to expire June 30. The group also called for a study to find a permanent solution to persistent crowding, such as a local law requiring developers to help fund public improvements in areas of crowded schools.The fight over the moratorium, which applies to districts where elementary schools are more than 20 percent over capacity, has pitted homebuilders against school advocates.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | September 27, 1999
The Robey administration has submitted a bill to the Howard County Council to strengthen the county's law regulating home construction based on crowding in county schools and on roads.The bill, scheduled for formal introduction Oct. 4, follows the recommendations of a 15-member committee that worked during the spring and summer to tighten the county's Adequate Public Facilities Ordinance. The law is intended to ensure that new residential construction doesn't overwhelm public schools and roadways.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | January 7, 1999
Twenty years ago, Carroll County officials set out to lure thousands of newcomers to the Eldersburg area by turning farmland into housing developments. They drew up a master plan for roads, schools and public utilities to accommodate expected growth.The people, lured by low taxes, good schools and green vistas, came, doubling the population to nearly 30,000. But almost nothing in the master plan was built.Today, nearly every school in South Carroll is surrounded by portable classrooms, and the area suffers through seasonal water shortages.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | November 19, 2008
Enrollment in Baltimore County public schools has continued to decline slightly, but areas of growth - with some schools far exceeding their capacity - remain, according to a new report. This year marks the sixth consecutive time that the school system has had fewer students than the previous year. There are 103,643 students enrolled - down 1,071 from 2007. The district has about 5,100 fewer students than in 2003. "We are a county that has pockets of growth and decline happening simultaneously in many different areas," said Chris Brocato, a school system planning analyst, referring to the 2008 report on enrollment, projections and capacities, which is to be presented to the school board tonight.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | September 25, 2008
Though Anne Arundel County school officials have met the mandate to provide all-day kindergarten, they struggled to find additional space for their youngest students. Along the way, the number of portable classrooms more than doubled. Now Superintendent Kevin M. Maxwell and the school board are working to reverse that trend - and are seeking to put all students in a school under the same roof. The county school board recently approved design plans for construction at five elementary schools - Broadneck, Central, Crofton Woods, Hilltop and Windsor Farm - that would create more classroom space and eliminate the need for portable or relocatable classrooms.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | February 11, 2007
Building homes near crowded schools will be tougher to do in Harford County, especially in areas near Bel Air where portable classrooms surround most schools. The County Council unanimously passed a measure last week that strengthens the adequate public facilities law, which limits home construction where infrastructure is burdened. The momentum for the legislation comes largely in response to parents concerned with crowded classrooms. Under the former law, home building could proceed in an area with crowded schools if a new school was in the planning stages.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Reporter | January 28, 2007
Though an effort to tighten a law aimed at limiting residential construction near crowded schools was defeated recently, a less-restrictive proposal is expected to come before the County Council next month. The law - known as the adequate facilities ordinance - was enacted in 1991 to prevent residential construction in areas with crowded schools. But it allows proposed development to proceed if a nearby school's enrollment has not exceeded 105 percent of capacity and if relief - in the form of a new or expanded school - is planned for the near future.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN REPORTER | October 27, 2006
From the Eastern Shore to Allegany County and Silver Spring to Aberdeen, suburban voters are riled up about development, angered by what they view as too many new homes, too much traffic and too many crowded schools. "It's been a top issue, I think, in every county of the state," said Dru Schmidt-Perkins, director of 1000 Friends of Maryland, a private environmental conservation group that helped sponsor a group of "visioning" exercises around the state this year to draft blueprints for long term growth.
NEWS
By JUSTIN FENTON and JUSTIN FENTON,SUN REPORTER | August 8, 2006
A Harford County councilman is charging that the county government is violating a law delaying development around crowded schools - a touchy issue this election year. Suburban politicians are under pressure from voters resentful of school crowding and traffic congestion to limit home construction, while builders complain the restrictions are driving up housing prices and forcing people to commute farther to work. But Harford County government approved nearly 2,200 residential permits in 2005, the most in at least a decade, according to figures from the Planning and Zoning Department.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2002
Ask the candidates running for the House of Delegates from the 11th District to name a key issue, and they'll probably give the same response: crowded schools. The western Baltimore County district covers several communities struggling with crowded schools, such as New Town Elementary in Owings Mills, where new enrollments have been halted. Nearly all of the six candidates vying for three delegate seats support building more schools and using increased state funding for education to reduce class sizes.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2000
Howard County government must find ways to keep classsize down in its middle schools as well as elementary schools covered by county law, according to people who spoke at a public hearing before the County Council last night. Parents, especially in the Ellicott City area, complained that despite the 1992 Adequate Public Facilities Law, hundreds of new homes can be built around badly crowded schools before the law kicks in. "Educational excellence is in jeopardy," said Debra Plunkett, a PTA president at Ilchester Elementary School.
NEWS
By JOSH MITCHELL and JOSH MITCHELL,SUN REPORTER | May 15, 2006
With homes continuing to be built near severely crowded schools despite a law to stop such construction, Baltimore County councilmen and representatives of county government plan to meet with public education officials to find a way to prevent development from overwhelming schools. A county councilman said he will form a task force rather than move forward with a proposal designed to require the school system to bus children from new homes near crowded schools to less crowded schools. School officials had raised concerns about the cost of transporting the children, while county officials said development could be cut off in huge swaths of the county.
NEWS
April 18, 2006
Police investigating death of a pedestrian Baltimore County police are investigating the death of a pedestrian who was struck and killed Sunday night on Harford Road. Louis Nemphos Jr., 42, of the first block of Hayloch Court in Nottingham was crossing Harford Road at Manns Avenue in Parkville about 8:45 p.m. Sunday when he was hit by a 1993 Mazda Protege driven by Steven Poljak, 17, of Towson, police said. Cpl. Michael Hill, a police spokesman, said he did not know whether Nemphos was in a crosswalk or what might have caused the accident.
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