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NEWS
By Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | May 11, 2003
My daughter was on vacation in mexico and she had cream of almond soup. I can't find a recipe for it. Do you have one? Your question interests me because I haven't thought about this dish since I lived in southern california many years ago. The obvious reason you see it on menus out there is because California is the only place in North America where almonds are grown commercially. Actually, when Franciscan priests first brought almonds from Spain to California, they were unsuccessful at their cultivation because they planted them too close to the coast.
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EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | December 5, 2012
Even those of us who enjoy the intimacy (and challenge) of sit-down-style dinner parties like the more informal holiday gatherings that revolve around appetizers and desserts for larger get-togethers. The host gets to strut a greater variety of interesting edibles than he usually whips up, and the guests get to mingle while enjoying each other's company and what are essentially finger foods. Another virtue of an appetizer and dessert party is that the "menu" can be eclectic, drawing inspiration from world cuisines in offerings that can appeal to virtually any tastes.
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NEWS
By ROB KASPER | January 21, 2009
At my house, we make soup in the winter. We do this because, as the French chef Auguste Escoffier once said, "Soup puts the heart at ease, calms down the violence of hunger, eliminates the tension of the day and awakens and refines the appetite." And we do it because soup is relatively easy to assemble and results in terrific leftovers. Moreover, we make soup because it is warm and January in Baltimore is cold. I have downed a lot of soup in my time. But until recently, when I became schooled on soup etiquette by reading a variety of soup Web sites, the best being Soupsong, I was unaware of the fine points of genteel soup sipping.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | January 21, 2009
At my house, we make soup in the winter. We do this because, as the French chef Auguste Escoffier once said, "Soup puts the heart at ease, calms down the violence of hunger, eliminates the tension of the day and awakens and refines the appetite." And we do it because soup is relatively easy to assemble and results in terrific leftovers. Moreover, we make soup because it is warm and January in Baltimore is cold. I have downed a lot of soup in my time. But until recently, when I became schooled on soup etiquette by reading a variety of soup Web sites, the best being Soupsong, I was unaware of the fine points of genteel soup sipping.
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 28, 2005
Peggy Snyder from Hillsdale, N.Y., was looking for a lost recipe for an easy salmon casserole. It once appeared on a box of Caesar croutons and was made using canned salmon and the croutons. Roz Goldman from Pikesville is sure that she has the recipe Peggy has lost. She says that she has made it many times and can confirm that "it's easy to prepare and enjoyed by all." s Taste section were calculated by registered dietitian Jodie Shield, except where noted.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 20, 1991
The following are three versions of Caesar salad from three great chefs, Julia Child, Bradley Ogden and Marion Cunningham. Ms. Cunningham's recipe was adapted from an article written for the Los Angeles Times.Julia's CaesarServes four to six.From "From Julia Child's Kitchen" (Alfred A. Knopf).2 large, crisp heads romaine lettuce2 large cloves garlicsaltolive oil2 cups unseasoned, homemade croutons (see below)2 eggsfreshly ground black pepperjuice of 1 lemonWorcestershire sauce1/4 cup Parmesan cheese, freshly gratedFor each person, select 6 to 8 whole, unblemished leaves of romaine, each 3 to 7 inches long.
NEWS
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | April 12, 2006
The Waterfront Hotel Amicci's 231 S. High St., Baltimore -- 410-528-1096 Hours --11:30 a.m.-10 p.m. Sundays-Thursdays; 11:30 a.m.-11 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays Restaurant's estimate --5-10 minutes Ready in --13 minutes With juicy chicken, fresh croutons and lots of lettuce, this order, $10.40, was really appetizing. The restaurant went a little heavy on the dressing, but also threw in a big wedge of soft Italian bread, which soaked it up nicely. Know of a good carryout place? Let us hear about it. Write to sam.sessa@baltsun.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | February 27, 2008
Thanks to Julius Caesar, we have leap year. Back in 45 B.C., he established it as part of his Julian calendar. In 1582, Pope Gregory XII fine-tuned it. In tribute to the leap year and the extra day of February it brings us this week, I ate Caesar salads. The original salad - a mixture of romaine lettuce, croutons, garlic, parmesan, a few drops of Worcestershire, olive oil, lemon juice and a raw egg - is said to be the creation of another guy named Caesar. That would be Caesar Cardini, a restaurateur who lived in San Diego and operated a hotel in Tijuana, Mexico, and claimed to create the dish in the 1920s.
NEWS
By K Kaufmann | July 7, 2004
Just can't get away from the office for lunch? At least try to watch what you eat. The sandwich better be on multi-grain bread, and you'll want some low-fat dressing -- hold the cheese and croutons -- to keep the salad healthful. That, in a nutshell, is the advice from most nutritionists on desktop dining. Vending machines and candy bowls are out, "taking ownership" of your food choices is in, according to Caitlyn Lorenze, 24, a registered dietitian and president of wholesomebody, a nutrition counseling group in Washington.
EXPLORE
By Donna Ellis | December 5, 2012
Even those of us who enjoy the intimacy (and challenge) of sit-down-style dinner parties like the more informal holiday gatherings that revolve around appetizers and desserts for larger get-togethers. The host gets to strut a greater variety of interesting edibles than he usually whips up, and the guests get to mingle while enjoying each other's company and what are essentially finger foods. Another virtue of an appetizer and dessert party is that the "menu" can be eclectic, drawing inspiration from world cuisines in offerings that can appeal to virtually any tastes.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | February 27, 2008
Thanks to Julius Caesar, we have leap year. Back in 45 B.C., he established it as part of his Julian calendar. In 1582, Pope Gregory XII fine-tuned it. In tribute to the leap year and the extra day of February it brings us this week, I ate Caesar salads. The original salad - a mixture of romaine lettuce, croutons, garlic, parmesan, a few drops of Worcestershire, olive oil, lemon juice and a raw egg - is said to be the creation of another guy named Caesar. That would be Caesar Cardini, a restaurateur who lived in San Diego and operated a hotel in Tijuana, Mexico, and claimed to create the dish in the 1920s.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN REPORTER | October 4, 2006
Move over, Food Network. Two new Web sites hope you'll think food networking instead. Chow.com, a new forum with food articles, message boards and a blog that encourages conversation about cooking and dining out, is the online version of a folded magazine of the same name. Bakespace.com, which calls itself "a place for cookers and cakers," is the brainchild of Babette Pepaj, a 33-year-old producer of reality television shows in Los Angeles who has a passion for cupcakes. It's modeled after the wildly popular My Space.
NEWS
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | April 12, 2006
The Waterfront Hotel Amicci's 231 S. High St., Baltimore -- 410-528-1096 Hours --11:30 a.m.-10 p.m. Sundays-Thursdays; 11:30 a.m.-11 p.m. Fridays-Saturdays Restaurant's estimate --5-10 minutes Ready in --13 minutes With juicy chicken, fresh croutons and lots of lettuce, this order, $10.40, was really appetizing. The restaurant went a little heavy on the dressing, but also threw in a big wedge of soft Italian bread, which soaked it up nicely. Know of a good carryout place? Let us hear about it. Write to sam.sessa@baltsun.
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 28, 2005
Peggy Snyder from Hillsdale, N.Y., was looking for a lost recipe for an easy salmon casserole. It once appeared on a box of Caesar croutons and was made using canned salmon and the croutons. Roz Goldman from Pikesville is sure that she has the recipe Peggy has lost. She says that she has made it many times and can confirm that "it's easy to prepare and enjoyed by all." s Taste section were calculated by registered dietitian Jodie Shield, except where noted.
NEWS
By K Kaufmann | July 7, 2004
Just can't get away from the office for lunch? At least try to watch what you eat. The sandwich better be on multi-grain bread, and you'll want some low-fat dressing -- hold the cheese and croutons -- to keep the salad healthful. That, in a nutshell, is the advice from most nutritionists on desktop dining. Vending machines and candy bowls are out, "taking ownership" of your food choices is in, according to Caitlyn Lorenze, 24, a registered dietitian and president of wholesomebody, a nutrition counseling group in Washington.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan and Jim Coleman & Candace Hagan,Knight Ridder / Tribune | May 11, 2003
My daughter was on vacation in mexico and she had cream of almond soup. I can't find a recipe for it. Do you have one? Your question interests me because I haven't thought about this dish since I lived in southern california many years ago. The obvious reason you see it on menus out there is because California is the only place in North America where almonds are grown commercially. Actually, when Franciscan priests first brought almonds from Spain to California, they were unsuccessful at their cultivation because they planted them too close to the coast.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN REPORTER | October 4, 2006
Move over, Food Network. Two new Web sites hope you'll think food networking instead. Chow.com, a new forum with food articles, message boards and a blog that encourages conversation about cooking and dining out, is the online version of a folded magazine of the same name. Bakespace.com, which calls itself "a place for cookers and cakers," is the brainchild of Babette Pepaj, a 33-year-old producer of reality television shows in Los Angeles who has a passion for cupcakes. It's modeled after the wildly popular My Space.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Rottenberg and Laura Rottenberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 13, 1997
In the early '90s, the Cal-Ital bistro was a new species in Baltimore. We'd seen them in other cities: bustling, minimalist-chic restaurants serving dazzling vegetable-heavy fare to an equally stunning young professional crowd. Paolo's, -- with a location in Towson and another in the Light Street Pavilion of Harborplace was among the area's first examples of the breed. Others have come and gone, but after nearly a decade, Paolo's continues to age gracefully.The parent company, Capital Restaurant Concepts, has maintained a stylish interior -- open show kitchen, crackling brick oven, and lots of black marble and Italian track lighting -- and a contemporary, affordable menu of light, unfussy pastas, salads and entrees.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Rottenberg and Laura Rottenberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 13, 1997
In the early '90s, the Cal-Ital bistro was a new species in Baltimore. We'd seen them in other cities: bustling, minimalist-chic restaurants serving dazzling vegetable-heavy fare to an equally stunning young professional crowd. Paolo's, -- with a location in Towson and another in the Light Street Pavilion of Harborplace was among the area's first examples of the breed. Others have come and gone, but after nearly a decade, Paolo's continues to age gracefully.The parent company, Capital Restaurant Concepts, has maintained a stylish interior -- open show kitchen, crackling brick oven, and lots of black marble and Italian track lighting -- and a contemporary, affordable menu of light, unfussy pastas, salads and entrees.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 20, 1991
The following are three versions of Caesar salad from three great chefs, Julia Child, Bradley Ogden and Marion Cunningham. Ms. Cunningham's recipe was adapted from an article written for the Los Angeles Times.Julia's CaesarServes four to six.From "From Julia Child's Kitchen" (Alfred A. Knopf).2 large, crisp heads romaine lettuce2 large cloves garlicsaltolive oil2 cups unseasoned, homemade croutons (see below)2 eggsfreshly ground black pepperjuice of 1 lemonWorcestershire sauce1/4 cup Parmesan cheese, freshly gratedFor each person, select 6 to 8 whole, unblemished leaves of romaine, each 3 to 7 inches long.
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