Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCrostini
IN THE NEWS

Crostini

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,McClatchy-Tribune | April 25, 2007
Sight gags are jokes that rely on visual cues rather than words. Imagine an apricot half-positioned over a puddle of plain yogurt to mimic a "fried egg." Or "sushi" made out of Rice Krispies and gummy worms, with fruit leather as a stand-in for the nori wrapper. Food that appears to be something else is a fun way to get kids to try something new. And the ruse can work on adults, too. These Sweet-and-Sour Crostini deceive the eyes while they tease the taste buds. In this case, the chopped "olives" are really -- gotcha!
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | May 17, 2008
A few months ago, a senior at Amherst College in Massachusetts (where my spouse teaches) asked if I would meet with her to discuss culinary careers. I love to mentor young people, so we set up a coffee date. After talking to this 22-year-old, I was so impressed with her passion and determination that I asked if she would like to work with me as an assistant to see what producing a column on entertaining such as this one involves. For several weeks, Natanya chopped and sliced food and washed dishes while I tested and retested recipes, then arranged and photographed them.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Cathy Thomas and Cathy Thomas,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | December 24, 1995
Crostini and bruschetta -- gutsy little Italian appetizers with an endless variety of Mediterranean-style toppings -- are turning up on the menus of trendy Italian restaurants all over.Slivers of toasted bread with sun-ripened tomatoes, garden-fresh basil leaves and fresh mozzarella. A thin layer of goat cheese or soft herb-garlic cheese spread topped with strips of roasted red bell peppers, capers and a drizzle of olive oil. Prosciutto and a shaving of Parmesan.Delicioso.And perfect for home-style holiday entertaining without fuss.
NEWS
By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,McClatchy-Tribune | April 25, 2007
Sight gags are jokes that rely on visual cues rather than words. Imagine an apricot half-positioned over a puddle of plain yogurt to mimic a "fried egg." Or "sushi" made out of Rice Krispies and gummy worms, with fruit leather as a stand-in for the nori wrapper. Food that appears to be something else is a fun way to get kids to try something new. And the ruse can work on adults, too. These Sweet-and-Sour Crostini deceive the eyes while they tease the taste buds. In this case, the chopped "olives" are really -- gotcha!
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | May 17, 2008
A few months ago, a senior at Amherst College in Massachusetts (where my spouse teaches) asked if I would meet with her to discuss culinary careers. I love to mentor young people, so we set up a coffee date. After talking to this 22-year-old, I was so impressed with her passion and determination that I asked if she would like to work with me as an assistant to see what producing a column on entertaining such as this one involves. For several weeks, Natanya chopped and sliced food and washed dishes while I tested and retested recipes, then arranged and photographed them.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | March 19, 2000
Crostini (Italian for "little toasts") are bread- or polenta-based appetizers that highlight the versatility of Italian cooking. Topped with sage-scented chicken liver pate, caponata or anchovy and a bit of cheese, crostini can be as elaborate or simple as the palate and the occasion warrants. These charming canapes are most often baked, broiled or toasted. For toasted bread rounds, preheat oven to 350 degrees. Slice day-old baguettes into 1/4 -inch slices. Brush on both sides with olive oil; place on baking sheet; dust with grated Parmesan, if desired.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | June 7, 1998
It always pleases me to meet young people who have an interest in food, as my own career was sparked by a year of study in France when I was in college. Several weeks ago, I received a phone call from an Amherst College senior who told me of a new gourmet club that she and other students had founded at the school."Would you be willing to give the group a cooking class?" she asked. We agreed on a date, and on the day of the lesson eight enthusiastic beginning cooks appeared at my door.Their ardor never waned during the three-hour session in which we prepared a simple Italian-inspired meal.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | February 21, 1999
For a cook, an impromptu meal, organized at the last minute, is often more enjoyable than a dinner planned weeks in advance. Typically, when I schedule a dinner party, I invite guests two weeks ahead. Then I spend several hours culling my files and food magazines for menu selections. The day before the dinner, I cook most of the dishes, and finally I arrange fresh flowers for the table and iron napkins. And, of course, there's the house to get cleaned.Last-minute entertaining is much more spontaneous and certainly less stressful for me. This week, for example, when friends who had been searching for a new house telephoned to tell us that they had just bought their dream home, I invited them to bring photos of their future residence and come for supper the following evening.
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | August 11, 1991
If you think of antipasto as that predictable plate of cured meats and sliced cheeses served in Italian restaurants, you have been both deceived and deprived.Michele Scicolone, even though she grew up in an Italian-American household, thought of it this way, too. "Restaurants in America have presented us with that stereotype," she says.But then 20 years ago, on her honeymoon, she and her brand-new husband went to Italy. They went into a small restaurant in Rome and there, off to the side of the dining room, was a huge banquet table spread with platters filled with all kinds of dishes.
NEWS
By Russ Parsons and Russ Parsons,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 1, 2005
I was checking out at the grocery store the other day when the clerk asked whether I wanted the green tops removed from my carrots. I started reflexively to answer "yes," as I always have except for that brief period I was in charge of feeding my daughter's guinea pig Dovey. But this time I hesitated. Dovey has long since left the building, but I had a sudden flash of what those carrot tops smelled like when I was chopping them up - intensely green, like turbocharged parsley. I already had a big old gnarly celery root, and I thought for a moment about how those two might go together.
NEWS
By Russ Parsons and Russ Parsons,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 1, 2005
I was checking out at the grocery store the other day when the clerk asked whether I wanted the green tops removed from my carrots. I started reflexively to answer "yes," as I always have except for that brief period I was in charge of feeding my daughter's guinea pig Dovey. But this time I hesitated. Dovey has long since left the building, but I had a sudden flash of what those carrot tops smelled like when I was chopping them up - intensely green, like turbocharged parsley. I already had a big old gnarly celery root, and I thought for a moment about how those two might go together.
NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,Universal Press Syndicate | March 19, 2000
Crostini (Italian for "little toasts") are bread- or polenta-based appetizers that highlight the versatility of Italian cooking. Topped with sage-scented chicken liver pate, caponata or anchovy and a bit of cheese, crostini can be as elaborate or simple as the palate and the occasion warrants. These charming canapes are most often baked, broiled or toasted. For toasted bread rounds, preheat oven to 350 degrees. Slice day-old baguettes into 1/4 -inch slices. Brush on both sides with olive oil; place on baking sheet; dust with grated Parmesan, if desired.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | February 21, 1999
For a cook, an impromptu meal, organized at the last minute, is often more enjoyable than a dinner planned weeks in advance. Typically, when I schedule a dinner party, I invite guests two weeks ahead. Then I spend several hours culling my files and food magazines for menu selections. The day before the dinner, I cook most of the dishes, and finally I arrange fresh flowers for the table and iron napkins. And, of course, there's the house to get cleaned.Last-minute entertaining is much more spontaneous and certainly less stressful for me. This week, for example, when friends who had been searching for a new house telephoned to tell us that they had just bought their dream home, I invited them to bring photos of their future residence and come for supper the following evening.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | June 7, 1998
It always pleases me to meet young people who have an interest in food, as my own career was sparked by a year of study in France when I was in college. Several weeks ago, I received a phone call from an Amherst College senior who told me of a new gourmet club that she and other students had founded at the school."Would you be willing to give the group a cooking class?" she asked. We agreed on a date, and on the day of the lesson eight enthusiastic beginning cooks appeared at my door.Their ardor never waned during the three-hour session in which we prepared a simple Italian-inspired meal.
FEATURES
By Cathy Thomas and Cathy Thomas,ORANGE COUNTY REGISTER | December 24, 1995
Crostini and bruschetta -- gutsy little Italian appetizers with an endless variety of Mediterranean-style toppings -- are turning up on the menus of trendy Italian restaurants all over.Slivers of toasted bread with sun-ripened tomatoes, garden-fresh basil leaves and fresh mozzarella. A thin layer of goat cheese or soft herb-garlic cheese spread topped with strips of roasted red bell peppers, capers and a drizzle of olive oil. Prosciutto and a shaving of Parmesan.Delicioso.And perfect for home-style holiday entertaining without fuss.
FEATURES
By Linda Lowe Morris | August 11, 1991
If you think of antipasto as that predictable plate of cured meats and sliced cheeses served in Italian restaurants, you have been both deceived and deprived.Michele Scicolone, even though she grew up in an Italian-American household, thought of it this way, too. "Restaurants in America have presented us with that stereotype," she says.But then 20 years ago, on her honeymoon, she and her brand-new husband went to Italy. They went into a small restaurant in Rome and there, off to the side of the dining room, was a huge banquet table spread with platters filled with all kinds of dishes.
FEATURES
By TINA DANZE and TINA DANZE,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | June 9, 1999
Move over, pasta. There's a new ingredient for quick-fix, Italian-inspired meals. Now polenta also solves the what's-for-dinner quandary when time is short. Not polenta made from scratch, of course -- that would require laborious stove-top cooking. It's precooked polenta that woos weeknight cooks with "heat-and-serve" convenience.You may have noticed ready-made polenta at the supermarket. In its clear plastic packaging, it resembles a fat, golden sausage -- not exactly something that screams dinner.
FEATURES
By Susan Stuck and Susan Stuck,Contributing Writer | December 23, 1992
Here's the typical holiday scenario: Overindulge from late November to Dec. 31, then wake up on New Year's Day and resolve never to do it again.Festive occasions need not undermine health concerns. In developing recipes for the holidays, our test kitchens aimed to preserve the traditional tastes of the holidays while keeping fat content to a minimum. The result: crostini spread with smoked salmon spread or herbed yogurt cheese. These can be prepared in advance to minimize pre-party stress.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.