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NEWS
By Maria Garriott | November 23, 1992
''Our children are being damaged in ways we don't even know about yet. In my own community, I see more helicopters flying around with searchlights than I ever saw in Vietnam.''--George Buntin, executive director, Baltimore NAACPAgain,I lie awake.Outside,I hear loud voices,gunshots, screams.Men run through the alley,laughing.Another pursues,cursing.Fools, I fume.They play, butlife is snatched awaywith the speed of a bullet.I circle through the bedroomstouching each childpulling flimsy coversover fragile limbsremembering the God Of Danielin the lion's den.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
One of the ways you can judge a talk show's energy and momentum -- or lack of such -- is by the guests. When a show has strong producers and is going well, they have guests who bring energy, edge and insights to the production. The guests help make the production pop. One of the signs of a show going bad is low-rent guests -- folks not much in demand who are easy to book and bring nothing with them to the show. "Crossfire" had two of the latter Thursday with former New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson and former Maryland Gov. Bob Ehrlich.
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NEWS
By Michael Kinsley | January 23, 2005
HUNGRY FOR AN issue that will unite us rather than divide us, Americans have settled on a loathing of TV shows that divide us rather than unite us. The best-known of these so-called shoutfests is CNN's Crossfire, which has now been sacrificed on the altar of bad publicity. In October, the nation's philosopher-king, Jon Stewart, appeared on Crossfire and hilariously bested the show's two co-hosts on the question of Crossfire itself. Mr. Stewart's performance was a bit of a cheat. He grandly begged his interlocutors to "stop hurting America," then he repelled any counterargument by retreating into his shell like a turtle and declaring that he was just a comedian.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley is supposed to be Maryland's political TV star. Just ask him. But it was Congressman Andy Harris who drew the bigger national audience in his appearance on CNN's "Crossfire. " When O'Malley "debated" Texas Gov. Rick Perry Sept. 18 on "Crossfire," 329,000 viewers tuned in. When Harris appeared Monday on the CNN show with Anne Filipic, president of Enroll America, an organization trying to enroll people in Obamacare, the telecast drew 450,000 viewers. Before Harris starts thinking he's the most telegenic conservative since Ronald Reagan, or O'Malley sinks into a depression over the feared loss of his TV mojo, there's a major factor contributing to those audiences: the news flow of the day. Monday was a good night for cable news because of President Barack Obama's late afternoon appearance to talk about the deeply flawed rollout of the Affordable Care Act (a.k.a Obamacare)
NEWS
May 21, 1993
President Clinton finds himself caught in Capitol Hill crossfire that could undermine his entire economic program. The situation is complicated because, in our view, dissident Democrats in the House are right on target in attacking the deficit and dissident Democrats in the Senate are dead wrong in trying to kill the president's energy tax.Mr. Clinton obviously hopes to emerge from this legislative mess triumphing over tormentors from within his own party on both issues and thereby short-circuiting Republican mischief-makers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2013
I will leave it to the political reporters and analysts at The Sun to judge how Maryland Congressman Andy Harris did on CNN's "Crossfire" Monday night. For my money, he did just fine in his debate on Obamacare, showing what an act-like-you-know bluster mouth of misinformation and phony facts former Obama adviser and show host Stephanie Cutter is. Ostensibly, Harris was supposed to be debating Anne Filipic, a former Obama White House staffer who is now president of Enroll America, an organization signing people up for Obamacare.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
One of the ways you can judge a talk show's energy and momentum -- or lack of such -- is by the guests. When a show has strong producers and is going well, they have guests who bring energy, edge and insights to the production. The guests help make the production pop. One of the signs of a show going bad is low-rent guests -- folks not much in demand who are easy to book and bring nothing with them to the show. "Crossfire" had two of the latter Thursday with former New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson and former Maryland Gov. Bob Ehrlich.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley is supposed to be Maryland's political TV star. Just ask him. But it was Congressman Andy Harris who drew the bigger national audience in his appearance on CNN's "Crossfire. " When O'Malley "debated" Texas Gov. Rick Perry Sept. 18 on "Crossfire," 329,000 viewers tuned in. When Harris appeared Monday on the CNN show with Anne Filipic, president of Enroll America, an organization trying to enroll people in Obamacare, the telecast drew 450,000 viewers. Before Harris starts thinking he's the most telegenic conservative since Ronald Reagan, or O'Malley sinks into a depression over the feared loss of his TV mojo, there's a major factor contributing to those audiences: the news flow of the day. Monday was a good night for cable news because of President Barack Obama's late afternoon appearance to talk about the deeply flawed rollout of the Affordable Care Act (a.k.a Obamacare)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
I will leave it to The Sun's political reporters to write about who "won" or "lost" this cooked-up and dumbed-down TV cartoon of a debate between Gov. Martin O'Malley and his Texas counterpart Rick Perry Wednesday on CNN's "Crossfire. " I am only here to say how sad I am to see Maryland's Democratic governor and our political discourse bent to fit the phony dictates of cable TV this way. When comedian Jon Stewart famously denounced the "Crossfire" format in 2004, he called the two hosts that night, Tucker Carlson and Paul Begala, "partisan hacks.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | March 3, 1992
CNN proved once again last night that just about anybody can be a TV news personality.Two years ago, the Cable News Network plucked a district court judge off the bench in Dallas, Texas, and made her co-anchor of its dinner-time newscast.Last night, CNN took John Sununu, the former White House chief of staff, and made him co-host of "Crossfire."For those not familiar with the show, "Crossfire" is a nightly half-hour of political debate. It normally features Michael Kinsley "from the left," as CNN says, and Patrick Buchanan "from the right."
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2013
Rep. Andy Harris used an appearance Monday on CNN's Crossfire to argue that the problems people are facing as they try to sign up for health insurance through Obamacare are only the beginning. "Some things are just not fixable," said the Baltimore County Republican and Johns Hopkins trained physician who was elected on a platform of repealing the 2010 Affordable Care Act. "Is the health insurance system broken? Yeah it is, but getting the federal government to a one-sized fits all approach is not a great solution.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2013
I will leave it to the political reporters and analysts at The Sun to judge how Maryland Congressman Andy Harris did on CNN's "Crossfire" Monday night. For my money, he did just fine in his debate on Obamacare, showing what an act-like-you-know bluster mouth of misinformation and phony facts former Obama adviser and show host Stephanie Cutter is. Ostensibly, Harris was supposed to be debating Anne Filipic, a former Obama White House staffer who is now president of Enroll America, an organization signing people up for Obamacare.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
I will leave it to The Sun's political reporters to write about who "won" or "lost" this cooked-up and dumbed-down TV cartoon of a debate between Gov. Martin O'Malley and his Texas counterpart Rick Perry Wednesday on CNN's "Crossfire. " I am only here to say how sad I am to see Maryland's Democratic governor and our political discourse bent to fit the phony dictates of cable TV this way. When comedian Jon Stewart famously denounced the "Crossfire" format in 2004, he called the two hosts that night, Tucker Carlson and Paul Begala, "partisan hacks.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2013
After circling each other for days, Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley and Texas Gov. Rick Perry clashed Wednesday in a nationally televised debate that was focused on state economic policy but tied closely to presidential politics. The state leaders - both of whom are feeling out runs for president in 2016 - traded flurries of statistics and jabs as each used the 30-minute appearance on CNN's "Crossfire" to argue his vision for the nation's economy. Debating one another for the first time since 2011, the governors shared a national spotlight hours after Perry arrived in Maryland to attack O'Malley's business policies - the latest trip in a years-long effort by the Republican to lure companies away from Democratic states.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2010
When he was named to head the Maryland Transit Administration late last year, Ralign T. Wells enjoyed a brief honeymoon amid upbeat stories of the bus driver who rose through the ranks to head an agency with 3,300 employees and an annual budget of $617 million. His rapport with MTA riders seemed to weather the problems that arose during February's blizzards, which knocked the aboveground portion of the Metro subway out of service for about a week. But summer, with the wear and tear it brings to the vulnerable MARC system, is raising the heat on the 43-year-old administrator in multiple ways — including criticism from former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. With the MARC commuter train service afflicted with breakdowns and rider complaints, Wells and his agency have been thrust into the middle of this year's gubernatorial campaign.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | January 8, 2010
Here's the tally from the Baltimore police commissioner's war on bad guys with guns during the opening minute of 2010: A blue .38-caliber Smith & Wesson with four rounds in the chamber. A 9 mm PA-63 semiautomatic handgun. A .38-caliber Rossi revolver. A Mossburg 12-gauge shotgun. A chrome two-shot, .38-caliber Derringer pistol. Five guns, four suspects, two houses. These guns and arrests were made at rowhouses in East and Northwest Baltimore by police officers who were out by the hundreds over New Year's hunting for holiday revelers celebrating by shooting guns into the air. In all, on New Year's Eve and New Year's Day, city police confiscated 29 guns and made 41 gun-related arrests.
NEWS
By Miranda Barnes and Miranda Barnes,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | June 1, 1996
As Minga Lewis shouts, "Aren't you sick and tired of being sick and tired?" a group of people at St. Edward's Catholic Church in Northwest Baltimore begins to cheer.But they are not responding to an inspirational sermon. For three hours, parishioners and residents of the Rosemont community have become actors, and St. Edward is a movie studio.George Millner watches from the rear of the 116-year-old church as the screenplay he wrote nearly five years ago comes to life. It is a movie about how a Baltimore neighborhood fights to save itself.
SPORTS
By KEVIN ECK | January 18, 2009
Jeff Hardy has always been explosive, but that description took on a whole new meaning Friday on SmackDown. The pyrotechnics went awry during his entrance and he was engulfed in the crossfire in a scripted "accident." ( For more, go to baltimoresun.com/ringposts)
SPORTS
By KEVIN ECK | January 18, 2009
Jeff Hardy has always been explosive, but that description took on a whole new meaning Friday on SmackDown. The pyrotechnics went awry during his entrance and he was engulfed in the crossfire in a scripted "accident." ( For more, go to baltimoresun.com/ringposts)
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,melissa.harris@baltsun.com | November 21, 2008
A 24-year-old Baltimore man was sentenced yesterday to 25 years in prison for shooting and killing an innocent bystander, a Patterson High School senior and lacrosse team captain, during a gunfight. Jerome Whitaker was sentenced along with Brandon Green, 23, who was given a five-year term as an accessory after the fact in the murder of Christopher Clarke in March, 2007. The hearing yesterday in Baltimore Circuit Court lasted only a few minutes, as the judge had agreed to the sentences in October in exchange for guilty pleas.
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