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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer | March 18, 1993
Baltimore County schoolchildren may one day be able to cross the street as children in every other Maryland county do -- under the protection of their school bus's flashing red lights.The county's Senate delegation to the General Assembly has overwhelmingly approved a local bill to end the county's practice of requiring students to cross the street before their bus arrives in the morning and after it pulls away in the afternoon.If the House delegation also approves the legislation, the full General Assembly would likely pass the bill as a local courtesy.
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NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2011
A 14-year-old girl from Pylesville was killed by a vehicle while she was crossing Harkins Road Thursday afternoon, Maryland State Police said in a statement. The girl was hit by a sport utility vehicle shortly after 3:30 p.m. in the 2200 block of Harkins Road, near the intersection of Amos Mill and W. Heaps roads. The accident was several miles south of the Maryland-Pennsylvania border. The driver of the SUV, who was not hurt in the accident, has been identified and is a Pylesville resident, according to an initial investigation by police.
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NEWS
October 13, 1992
WHY IS IT that students at the nation's 15th ranked university can't figure out how to cross the street?These days it's almost impossible to drive down Charles Street past 34th Street without being accosted by a crowd of 10 or more Hopkins students edging across the roadway.Since the renovation of two old apartment buildings as dormitories across the street from the Homewood campus of Hopkins, there have been consistent problems with students walking into traffic on their way to class. The new dorms house more than half of the freshman and sophomore classes, and this year marks the first time Hopkins is enforcing a two-year residency requirement on its students.
NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS JR | February 26, 2006
WASHINGTON -- I hate telephones. Yes, they're indispensable tools of communication, but I hate them for the tension of that moment between the ring and the answer, that instant of apprehension before you know what the call will bring. It is a fraction of time when all nightmares seem possible. I trace the feeling to an awful night 13 years ago when the telephone yanked us up out of sleep to the news that my wife's brother had been murdered 3,000 miles away. Ever since then, I've been this way. Intellectually, I know that a telephone brings tragedy only once in a thousand rings.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch | March 10, 1991
A 6-year-old boy was struck and killed by a pickup truck i West Baltimore yesterday afternoon as his mother watched from across the street.According to police, Kevin Gregory Lee, of the first block of Bruce Street, was waiting to cross West Baltimore Street from the north side of the 1700 block about 2:30 p.m. as his mother, Audrey McLean, waited on the south side. Mrs. McLean motioned to her son to walk to the corner and cross the street there, police said, but the boy apparently thought his mother was signaling him to cross from where he stood.
NEWS
February 12, 1996
THEY'RE SMALL, round, attached to countless poles throughout the city and state, and seemingly useless.Guesses, anyone?Congratulations if you reckoned those ever-present "push to cross the street" buttons.These gizmos are installed at busy intersections where pedestrians might need more time to cross the street. Their purpose: If pushed, they supposedly lengthen the time traffic is stopped for pedestrians to cross.But Walter Freidman -- who lives in Federal Hill near the Inner Harbor, walks to work daily and pushes the button at Light and Pratt streets -- wonders whether any of the buttons work.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | April 2, 1994
Baltimore County's legislators moved closer yesterday to compromise on a bill that would enlarge the county school board and change its composition, but held off action on a school bus safety measure that the school system opposes.With less than two weeks remaining in the 90-day legislative session, House delegation chairman E. Farrell Maddox warned that any delay on the school board bill could be fatal. His colleagues nonetheless approved amendments that would force it to a conference with the Senate delegation.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | March 6, 1992
At about 8:15 on a weekday morning, sidewalks around Taggart School in Philadelphia begin to fill with children. Crossing guard Marilyn Miller talks, but her eyes look elsewhere, darting, trying to catch the little ones before they cross the street where they shouldn't."
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun Staff Writer | March 26, 1994
The death of sixth-grader Joseph Stephen Vinci as he tried to cross Old York Road on a dark January morning last year to catch his school bus has left Baltimore County's legislators with a dilemma.If they listen to Joey's father, aunt and neighbors, Baltimore County will join the other 22 Maryland counties that require school buses to stop, with red signals flashing, before children cross busy streets to board or go home.But if they listen to the objections of county school officials and bus drivers, they will leave the responsibility for safety while crossing streets to and from school buses with children and parents, as it is in Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Rebecca Emberley | February 3, 1999
Editor's note: This retelling of ``The Three Billy Goats Gruff'' is set in the heart of a city where an enormous rat tries to keep three goats from crossing the street.Once upon a time, in a big, big city, in a small open lot, lived the Three Cool Kids: Big, Middle, and Little.The Three Cool Kids liked the lot that they lived on. They had been there for as long as any of them could remember.But after many years of grazing, the grass and the weeds were getting sparse, and a great deal of construction was going on next door.
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN STAFF | February 27, 2002
The little yellow boxes are only as powerful as their low-watt blinking lights, but they hold enormous sway over the masses on street corners all over the planet: When the devices give their marching orders, people march. And they don't stop moving until signaled to do so. This month those boxes, the "WALK/DON'T WALK" signs that have become the real movers and stoppers of society, are marking their 50th anniversary on New York street corners - their place of birth, so far as anyone can confirm.
NEWS
By Theodore Feldmann | October 4, 2000
IT'S PEACEFUL EARLY in the morning for a neighborhood in the heart of the city, one they call Charles North. At the rear of the house, I hear crickets, birds and the clanging bells of the trains at Penn Station. Out front, the sun illuminates the detail on the houses across St. Paul Street. Beautifully varied in design, standing proudly since the 1880s, it's easy to understand why this three-block area is on the National Register of Historic Places. Beyond North Avenue, the towers and spires of Seventh Baptist, St. Mark's, Lovely Lane, and St. Michael and All Angels remind me that this was once an area where the wealthy lived and prayed.
BUSINESS
By Charles Belfoure and Charles Belfoure,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 21, 2000
If you want to strike up a conversation with a stranger on the streets of Hampstead, just mention the word traffic, advises Chris Cavey. "You'll have a compadre for life," he said with a laugh. The first reported appearance of a car in Hampstead was in 1903. For the next 80 years, the houses that lined the Hanover Pike watched a slow trickle of cars pass by their front porches. Then, in the mid-1980s, the trickle turned into a torrent with the opening of Interstate 795, which set off a deluge of development in northern Carroll County and southern Pennsylvania.
NEWS
By ROSALIE FALTER and ROSALIE FALTER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 7, 1999
COURTEOUS AND friendly to passers-by, but never taking her eyes or attention off the children in her charge, Patty Arrington goes about doing a job she loves, seeing that pupils on their way to school cross the streets safely.Arrington has been a crossing guard with the Anne Arundel County Police Department since 1985, shepherding pupils to and from Linthicum Elementary and Lindale-Brooklyn Park Middle schools.She said she wanted to be able to stay home with her children and found this to be the perfect job to fit in with their schedule.
FEATURES
By Rebecca Emberley | February 3, 1999
Editor's note: This retelling of ``The Three Billy Goats Gruff'' is set in the heart of a city where an enormous rat tries to keep three goats from crossing the street.Once upon a time, in a big, big city, in a small open lot, lived the Three Cool Kids: Big, Middle, and Little.The Three Cool Kids liked the lot that they lived on. They had been there for as long as any of them could remember.But after many years of grazing, the grass and the weeds were getting sparse, and a great deal of construction was going on next door.
NEWS
July 14, 1997
WITH ABOUT 40 communities having requested speed humps from the city Department of Public Works this year, you'd think the things would be universally popular.But not near Hazelwood Avenue in Northeast Baltimore, where a series of humps installed in the 4500 block in late May has left some neighbors jolting mad."Humps are for camels," said Bill Brigerman, a resident of nearby Seymour Avenue. "Whose bright idea was it to install them in the first place? Sounds like something that would come from the Harper Valley PTA in cooperation with DPW. Luckily, I'm not an egg salesman."
NEWS
May 21, 1996
Gas is cheaper south of hereI had the opportunity to drive to southern Virginia recently, and had to buy gas at stations directly off Interstate 81.At no time did I pay more than $1.15 a gallon.I asked at one gas station if there was a price war, and was told this is the price gas sells for down there.At the same time, gas in most stations in Baltimore was selling for $1.33.Maybe the gas companies or gas station owners could explain to the public how there could be such a difference in price.
NEWS
By Theodore Feldmann | October 4, 2000
IT'S PEACEFUL EARLY in the morning for a neighborhood in the heart of the city, one they call Charles North. At the rear of the house, I hear crickets, birds and the clanging bells of the trains at Penn Station. Out front, the sun illuminates the detail on the houses across St. Paul Street. Beautifully varied in design, standing proudly since the 1880s, it's easy to understand why this three-block area is on the National Register of Historic Places. Beyond North Avenue, the towers and spires of Seventh Baptist, St. Mark's, Lovely Lane, and St. Michael and All Angels remind me that this was once an area where the wealthy lived and prayed.
NEWS
May 21, 1996
Gas is cheaper south of hereI had the opportunity to drive to southern Virginia recently, and had to buy gas at stations directly off Interstate 81.At no time did I pay more than $1.15 a gallon.I asked at one gas station if there was a price war, and was told this is the price gas sells for down there.At the same time, gas in most stations in Baltimore was selling for $1.33.Maybe the gas companies or gas station owners could explain to the public how there could be such a difference in price.
NEWS
February 12, 1996
THEY'RE SMALL, round, attached to countless poles throughout the city and state, and seemingly useless.Guesses, anyone?Congratulations if you reckoned those ever-present "push to cross the street" buttons.These gizmos are installed at busy intersections where pedestrians might need more time to cross the street. Their purpose: If pushed, they supposedly lengthen the time traffic is stopped for pedestrians to cross.But Walter Freidman -- who lives in Federal Hill near the Inner Harbor, walks to work daily and pushes the button at Light and Pratt streets -- wonders whether any of the buttons work.
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