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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2011
For this week's weekend dining review of Republic Noodle, Kit Waskorn Pollard subs in for John Houser III. Republic Noodle opened in September just south of Cross Street Market in the Riverside neighborhood. If you walk by Republic Noodle when it's closed, a roll down security door makes it look like a discount tennis shoe store. Not so, Republic Noodle is a fine little BYOB, serving a manageable pan-Asian menu. The owners are David Lynch and Christopher Boylan, and the chef de cuisine is Henry Hong, formerly of Suzie's Soba.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
If a hotly debated Federal Hill beer garden were to open in time for Oktoberfest, it would have to do so without the beer. By a 2-1 vote Thursday, Baltimore's liquor board declared invalid a liquor license for Crossbar Der Biergarten, saying it expired in 2009 and the owners would not get a "hardship extension. " "The sale of liquor is a privilege, not a right," said board chairman Thomas Ward, who called past extensions of the proposed bar's license "illegal" decisions that the current board had a "duty to correct.
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NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 14, 2010
An early morning fight Sunday in front of Cross Street Market in Federal Hill sent a 24-year-old man to the hospital with a slashed artery in his lower back, police said. The man's alleged attacker, 22-year-old Pasadena resident Leonus Matthews, was arrested for first and second-degree assault after stepping in to assist a family member who was originally fighting with the victim, police said. "The bars had let out. People had too much to drink. Tension's ran high. There was an altercation," said Detective Nicole Monroe, a Baltimore City Police spokeswoman.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
The city's zoning board on Tuesday denied an appeal by a Federal Hill group to create an open-air beer garden across from the Cross Street Market. Board members voted 3-2 to grant conditional approval to the courtyard beer garden in the first block of Cross Street, but the appeal needed a four-vote majority to pass. Board Chairman Geoffrey Washington, who voted for the appeal, proposed several conditions. The bar would have to operate as a restaurant, selling more food than beer.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 2, 1996
Brand-new years arrive bearing brand-new anxieties. It's all uncharted territory out there, and the landscape is filled with dangers. What if '96 turns out worse than '95? Is that possible? Is that legal? Fortunately for everyone, help and inspiration have arrived with (ELLIPSES)...Twenty-Five Reasons to Go On Living:1. Nation of Islam Security hasn't asked for the security contract at the Owings Mills mall.2. Nearly a hundred people have signed up to run for congressional seats, and not one of them is named Ellen Sauerbrey.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | June 2, 1998
With a project that will bring more than 200 parking spaces to South Baltimore and Federal Hill by the end of next year, the area's business association hopes to put an end to parking problems that have frustrated visitors to the neighborhood and stymied growth.A 320-space parking structure, known as the South Baltimore garage, is planned at an existing surface lot near the Cross Street Market.The proposed $5 million to $6 million garage would increase the number of spaces to about 320, from about 100 in the existing lot. It would have at least two decks.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | May 1, 1992
Din Rentmester and Joel Heffron are in Baltimore, but you would think they were in ecstasy."We drove here for the food," they say. The couple arrived from New York City Friday, checked into the Hyatt and got a good tip: Go to Nick's Inner Harbor Seafood at the Cross Street Market in South Baltimore.On a chill, sodden Saturday afternoon, Ms. Rentmester and Mr. Heffron are cozy and content after consuming dozens of Nick's oysters, crabs and shrimp, a pretzel or two from a nearby stall and plenty of beer.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Staff Writer | May 1, 1992
Din Rentmester and Joel Heffron are in Baltimore, but you would think they were in ecstasy."We drove here for the food," they say. The couple arrived from New York City Friday, checked into the Hyatt and got a good tip: Go to Nick's Inner Harbor Seafood at the Cross Street Market in South Baltimore.On a chill, sodden Saturday afternoon, Ms. Rentmester and Mr. Heffron are cozy and content after consuming dozens of Nick's oysters, crabs and shrimp, a pretzel or two from a nearby stall and plenty of beer.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | February 25, 2014
The city's zoning board on Tuesday denied an appeal by a Federal Hill group to create an open-air beer garden across from the Cross Street Market. Board members voted 3-2 to grant conditional approval to the courtyard beer garden in the first block of Cross Street, but the appeal needed a four-vote majority to pass. Board Chairman Geoffrey Washington, who voted for the appeal, proposed several conditions. The bar would have to operate as a restaurant, selling more food than beer.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2000
Even Federal Hill's time had to come. The neighborhood, one of Baltimore's most gentrified, is filled with so many young urban professionals with cash to spend, and so many vacant storefronts. Now, some business leaders say, the area is ready to bring in retailers. And they want the chains. They're talking Gaps, Banana Republics, Foot Lockers, almost anything found at the tourist-friendly Gallery at the Inner Harbor just a mile away. Not everyone agrees with trying to attract the prolific, homogenized stores that have become a measure of successful urban renewal.
NEWS
December 20, 2013
If there's one place which has absolutely no right to judge others, it is Baltimore City ("Columbia drab? Duh," Dec. 16). And I say that kindly - and lovingly. I grew up in Baltimore, and I'm the first to defend it. Who better than a former citizen to understand a city's beauty and its flaws? Baltimore has always been odd, if not downright weird. I was raised on stories of farming pigs in chain-linked Hampden gardens. I ate shrimp salad sandwiches, smiling at the toothless and nigh incomprehensible wash-and-set dinner ladies at Cross Street Market.
NEWS
June 27, 2013
While is it not our custom to oppose business investment in Baltimore, particularly the prized kind that creates jobs without requiring public subsidies, it would be difficult not to sympathize with the residents of Federal Hill and the problems they've encountered with the high volume of drunks in the vicinity of Cross Street Market. The proposal to create a 300-seat beer garden on that same block has pushed opponents to the breaking point. Enforcing drinking laws is one thing, but surely even the most pro-business advocate must admit there can be a critical mass of bar patrons beyond which Federal Hill and its environs can't function.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
Ann H. Sisson, who established with her husband a popular Federal Hill restaurant and bar that later became the state's first brew pub, died June 4 from complications of dementia at Keswick Multi-Care Center. She was 89. The daughter of a civil engineer and a homemaker, the former Ann Elizabeth Hamill was born in Baltimore and raised on St. Dunstans Garth in Homeland. After graduating in 1941 from Mount St. Agnes High School, she attended Mercy Hospital School of Nursing for a year.
SPORTS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2013
Police shut down a section of South Charles Street near Cross Street Market in Federal Hill Saturday night after a sea of purple flooded the street following the Raven's win over the Denver Broncos. Barricades were set up at the intersection of South Charles and West Hamburg streets, and southbound traffic was held up for several blocks. The police helicopter, Foxtrot, was called in to broadcast the message that revelers needed to disperse. Officers - on foot, horseback and in vehicles - saturated the area around the market.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2012
Orioles fans were still bubbling Saturday morning, many clad in orange while going for their morning jog or cup of joe, basking in the baseball glow that took more than a decade to shine on the city. "It's been rejuvenating the city," said James Parsons , 33, of Locust Point as he and his family took a walk to the Fort Avenue Starbucks. "It's been rough because it's been 15 years since they've been relevant. " Parson and his wife, Sarah, chuckled as her 1-year-old son Brandon, bedecked in Orioles gear played with his hat. The couple was just discussing baby-sitting plans as they look forward to using the Yankees game tickets they secured.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2011
For this week's weekend dining review of Republic Noodle, Kit Waskorn Pollard subs in for John Houser III. Republic Noodle opened in September just south of Cross Street Market in the Riverside neighborhood. If you walk by Republic Noodle when it's closed, a roll down security door makes it look like a discount tennis shoe store. Not so, Republic Noodle is a fine little BYOB, serving a manageable pan-Asian menu. The owners are David Lynch and Christopher Boylan, and the chef de cuisine is Henry Hong, formerly of Suzie's Soba.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Scott Wilson,SUN STAFF | August 11, 1996
A picture in the editions of Sunday, Aug. 11, erroneously identified Taylor's Meats as Nunnally Bros. Meats.The Sun regrets the error.Ed Knott keeps the schedule of an urban farmer. Up hours before the sun, laboring before most coffee pots click into action, ragged around the edges by noon. You could squeeze in nine innings between the time he begins his day and dawn.Knott's job is simple and essential to South Baltimore. On this Saturday at 5 a.m., he unlocks two doors -- one on Light Street, the other on South Charles Street.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | July 20, 2002
One recent quiet Sunday, my father, Joe Kelly, and I toured the old streets of South Baltimore, the places around Riverside and Federal Hill parks where he played as a child, visited his friends and generally called home. We used a curious map. It was a listing of the postal Zone 30 real estate transactions as detailed in this newspaper's Sunday real estate section. These were not the prices asked for South Baltimore homes but the prices realized, an indication of just how much some buyer is willing to pay to live in the places known so well to both of us. I should state that South Baltimore has never had a more loyal troubadour than my father, who loved its ancient thoroughfares and hidden courts when some Baltimoreans would not admit even a knowledge of the place.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2011
A Florida man repeated Sunday as champion of the U.S. National Oyster Shucking Contest held in St. Mary's County. The 2010 champion, Michael Martin, of Panama City Beach, won again, based on how quickly and completely he shucked 24 oysters, according to Beverly Brown, administrator of the St. Mary's County Oyster Festival. George Hastings of Nick's Inner Harbor Seafood at Baltimore's Cross Street Market finished in third place, Brown said. The victory qualifies Martin to compete in the world championships at the Galway International Oyster & Seafood Festival in Ireland next fall.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2011
The cardboard models showed what a new town hall near Cross Street Market in Federal Hill could look like. The graduate architecture students at Morgan State University crowded around professor Sanjit Roy as he critiqued the miniature buildings one by one. Roy picked up one model, carved out a section with an Exacto knife and reattached it at another spot to demonstrate how to improve the flow. "An urban site is ultimately all about movement," Roy told the students, and sent them back to their workstations to make revisions.
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