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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Octavia Dugan, who founded a Village of Cross Keys boutique and was considered an arbiter of traditional fashion, died in her sleep of undetermined causes Saturday at Palm City Nursing Home in Palm City, Fla. The former Cromwell Valley resident was 98. Born Octavia Whelan Chatard in Baltimore and raised on Calvert Street, she was the daughter of Dr. J. Albert Chatard, a physician, and Alice Whelan, a homemaker. She attended the Baltimore Academy of the Visitation and Notre Dame Preparatory School, where she graduated in 1934.
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FEATURES
By Donna M. Owens and For The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
When models strut down the outdoor catwalk at The Village of Cross Keys' annual One Great Fall fashion show on Sept. 20, the sartorial showcase will be about more than hemlines and high heels. Cross Keys, an upscale enclave of residences, boutiques and cafes in North Baltimore, will utilize the occasion to benefit the House of Ruth Maryland Inc., which provides services aimed at domestic violence victims. While the glamour and beauty of fashion may seem incompatible with the ugly and violent behavior of domestic abuse, organizers are billing the event as one that, ultimately, empowers women.
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CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
Brian Dermitt is ready for the rave reviews from visitors who arrive at his front door: "This is not your typical Cross Keys condo," he says. The spacious open-floor plan, contemporary decor and large windows of his seventh-floor unit at Harper House in the Village of Cross Keys make that evident. "The larger apartments on the ends and corners go quickly, but this sat on the market for two years," says Dermitt, a 45-year-old buyer for Shofer's Furniture in Federal Hill. "It was a three-bedroom floor plan [but]
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Octavia Dugan, who founded a Village of Cross Keys boutique and was considered an arbiter of traditional fashion, died in her sleep of undetermined causes Saturday at Palm City Nursing Home in Palm City, Fla. The former Cromwell Valley resident was 98. Born Octavia Whelan Chatard in Baltimore and raised on Calvert Street, she was the daughter of Dr. J. Albert Chatard, a physician, and Alice Whelan, a homemaker. She attended the Baltimore Academy of the Visitation and Notre Dame Preparatory School, where she graduated in 1934.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2013
Sitting on the cool patio at Donna's at Cross Key's, enjoying a fine dinner of gazpacho, Moroccan-spiced lamb meatballs and bouillabaisse, I got to telling my friends about the old days at Donna's. These friends weren't living in Baltimore back in 1992, when it all started. "You know," I told them, "no one was dipping bread in olive oil before Donna's started it. " I'm not sure they believed it. I'm not sure I believe it, but that's how I remember it. If you've forgotten 1992 - I know I have - Bill Clinton was elected president, the Orioles played their first season at Camden Yards and Michael Keaton was Batman.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
If Scoozi, the new contemporary Italian restaurant in the Village of Cross Keys, doesn't rise to the level of destination dining, it does provide Baltimore diners a pleasant alternative. The restaurant opened in December in the space at the Radisson Hotel at Cross Keys formerly occupied by the Village Roost, a restaurant best known for its power breakfasts back in the day when that term was still in vogue. We're talking the 1980s. In more recent decades, the Village Roost fell out of fashion, and it wasn't a big surprise when the hotel closed it as part of a larger remodeling and cooked up this new concept to take its place.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2012
The Village of Cross Keys, an upscale North Baltimore shopping center and one of the earliest projects of Columbia founder James W. Rouse, has been sold by General Growth Properties to Ashkenazy Acquisition Corp., a retail and office property investor, according to a notice to tenants delivered Wednesday. The center on Falls Road is now being managed by Jones Lang LaSalle Americas Inc., according to the memo to retailers from the center's management office. The open-air shopping center has about 30 shops and restaurants, including Williams-Sonoma, Talbots, Ruth Shaw and Elizabeth Arden Red Door Spa. Chicago-based General Growth, which owns most of the malls in the Baltimore area, has been selling off noncore assets to boost its balance sheet since emerging from bankruptcy in 2010.
SPORTS
December 18, 1990
Cross Keys Tennis Club will be host to a U.S. Tennis Association-sanctioned mixed doubled tournament Jan. 3-6. Admission is free. For more information, call 433-1800.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | September 26, 1990
The Rouse Co. is seeking City Council approval to expand its retail space at the Village of Cross Keys and make other changes there.Fifth District City Council members Iris Reeves, Rochelle "Rikki" Spector and Vera Hall jointly introduced Monday a bill that would amend a 1972 Planned Unit Development to permit a series of changes proposed by Village of Cross Keys Inc., a Rouse subsidiary.According to the legislation, the Columbia-based developer is seeking authorization to construct a new ballroom annex to the Cross Keys Inn; construct an office building in place of several apartment buildings that were permitted in the previous Cross Keys plan but never constructed; build a "limited number" of town houses; build parking facilities; and convert "some or all of the second floor of the Village Square from office uses to retail uses or to a combination of retail uses and office uses."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | November 23, 2000
You enjoyed eating crepes from the Crepe du Jour cart in the Village Square at Cross Keys; but you wanted, well, a little more in the way of a dining room. Head for Mount Washington, where the owners of the cart, Donna and Mustapha Snoussi, have opened a cafe of the same name at 1609 Sulgrave Ave. This is where Stone Mill Bakery was. Crepe du Jour's new location has been spiffed up with fresh paint and posters from Paris, and the cart's menu has been expanded. You can get crepes with all sorts of savory and sweet fillings, plus salads, quiche and homemade desserts.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2014
If Scoozi, the new contemporary Italian restaurant in the Village of Cross Keys, doesn't rise to the level of destination dining, it does provide Baltimore diners a pleasant alternative. The restaurant opened in December in the space at the Radisson Hotel at Cross Keys formerly occupied by the Village Roost, a restaurant best known for its power breakfasts back in the day when that term was still in vogue. We're talking the 1980s. In more recent decades, the Village Roost fell out of fashion, and it wasn't a big surprise when the hotel closed it as part of a larger remodeling and cooked up this new concept to take its place.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2014
Brian Dermitt is ready for the rave reviews from visitors who arrive at his front door: "This is not your typical Cross Keys condo," he says. The spacious open-floor plan, contemporary decor and large windows of his seventh-floor unit at Harper House in the Village of Cross Keys make that evident. "The larger apartments on the ends and corners go quickly, but this sat on the market for two years," says Dermitt, a 45-year-old buyer for Shofer's Furniture in Federal Hill. "It was a three-bedroom floor plan [but]
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | December 6, 2013
Conceding that the Village of Cross Keys is in need of "investment," the owner of the residential, retail and office complex is planning a mostly cosmetic makeover that would revamp the gatehouse, freshen the courtyard of the shopping center, and turn a so-called "tennis barn" on the grounds into a fitness center. "We buy properties that we want to improve," Joe Press, a senior vice president for Ashkenazy Acquisition Corp., told the Roland Park Civic League on Thursday. "This property hasn't had much put into it in a number of years.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2013
Editor's note: One in a series of occasional features on prominent local residents and the possessions they treasure. Ruth Shaw was a revolutionary in Baltimore women's fashion when she opened here eponymous boutique. She targeted sportswear by the greatest designers of the time. It wasn't unusual to find frocks from Jean Paul Gaultier and Dolce & Gabbana on the racks of her Cross Keys shop. Running such an establishment required her to travel all over the world, viewing collections and meeting with designers - she maintained an apartment in New York City to allow her to be closer to the latest fashions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2013
Sitting on the cool patio at Donna's at Cross Key's, enjoying a fine dinner of gazpacho, Moroccan-spiced lamb meatballs and bouillabaisse, I got to telling my friends about the old days at Donna's. These friends weren't living in Baltimore back in 1992, when it all started. "You know," I told them, "no one was dipping bread in olive oil before Donna's started it. " I'm not sure they believed it. I'm not sure I believe it, but that's how I remember it. If you've forgotten 1992 - I know I have - Bill Clinton was elected president, the Orioles played their first season at Camden Yards and Michael Keaton was Batman.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
The 1892 Beaux Arts mansion that once served as the summer home of the Abell family, founders of The Baltimore Sun, is on the market for $3.89 million. Located on 1.5 acres in a gated community off North Charles Street, the 15,000-square-foot home is being offered by Chris Dahdah of Hill & Co. Realtors in the Village of Cross Keys. The current owner purchased the house in 2006 and spent two years renovating it. "What's remarkable about this house is that you'd think something this large would be cavernous and cold with huge open spaces, [but]
BUSINESS
By Cindy Harper-Evans | February 28, 1991
The Bun Penny at Cross Keys, the gourmet wine and food shop where friends liked to gather to chat over a cup of coffee, closed Tuesday only two months after the Bun Penny at Harborplace shut down.The closing is another chapter to a saga that began when Rhoda and J. Malcolm Snape, owners of the two Bun Pennys, abandoned their businesses last year and fled to Europe, leaving behind debts of more than $260,000.The Bun Penny shops at Harborplace and the Cross Keys development on Falls Road are both owned by the Rouse Co. The Columbia-based development company was appointed manager of the operations after the stores were put in receivership and was running them until their subsequent closings.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | May 31, 2003
The mention of Cross Keys instantly conjures images of the posh North Baltimore commercial and residential community with its village square that was the dream of visionary developer James W. Rouse. The planned community, which was heavily influenced by the garden cities of Europe and Edward H. Bouton's Roland Park, was conceived and built in the early 1960s on the site of the Baltimore Country Club's former 68-acre golf course. It sprawled along the western edge of Falls Road between Coldspring Lane and Northern Parkway, with its southern boundary being marked by two schools, Baltimore Polytechnic Institute and Western High School.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2013
Passersby on Falls Road may catch a quick glimpse of what looks like a misplaced limestone mausoleum sitting atop a slight grassy berm in front of the Village of Cross Keys. What they're looking at is one of three surviving Greek Revival valve houses that once played a vital role in Baltimore's municipal water system. The 16-foot-by-11-foot structure, originally called the Harper Waste Weir by the city water department, was designed by James Slade, the city engineer for Boston and a consulting engineer for the Baltimore Water Works.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2012
Cary B. Beehler, a former Cross Keys sales associate and avid bird watcher whose travels took her all over the world in pursuit of her hobby, died May 7 from complications of a stroke at Gilchrist Hospice in Towson. The Blakehurst retirement community resident was 91. The daughter of the owner of Baxter Paper Co. and a homemaker, Cary Baxter was born in Baltimore and raised on Deepdene Road in Roland Park. She attended the Calvert School, Greenwood School and St. Mary's Seminary for Women, now St. Mary's College of Maryland, in St. Mary's City.
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