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By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2004
WASHINGTON - Mayor Anthony A. Williams and D.C. Council Chairman Linda W. Cropp reached an agreement last night that they expect to revive baseball's once-planned return to the city by altering the terms of a half-billion-dollar stadium-funding bill. The deal - the equivalent of a negotiating home run - was announced shortly before midnight. Major League Baseball officials were consulted about the latest compromise at regular intervals throughout the day. The latest agreement must be approved by the full council, which is meeting today.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 22, 2004
WASHINGTON -- It used to be said of baseball in the nation's capital, in a twist on the old line about George Washington, that it was first in war, first in peace -- and last in the American League. Despite the generally hapless record of the old Washington Senators, who fled the city for the second time 33 years ago, and an 11th-hour complication, hopes are high again that a team to be called the Washington Nationals will play here next year, this time in the National League. City Council Chairwoman Linda W. Cropp, who threatened to cancel the deal Mayor Anthony A. Williams had negotiated with the Major League Baseball owners to move the Montreal Expos to Washington, has now wrung some concessions from the owners and eased off on her threat.
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SPORTS
By Ed Waldman and Jeff Barker and Ed Waldman and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2004
WASHINGTON - In a political maneuver that delays for two weeks a vote on a stadium plan, the chairwoman of the D.C. Council moved to sharply reduce the public money that would be needed to build a ballpark for the relocated Montreal Expos. Saying she had yet another plan that would save Washington $350 million, D.C. Council chairwoman Linda W. Cropp yesterday outlined a proposal under which the city would finance about a third of the stadium's cost and leave the rest to a developer who would get a potentially lucrative federal tax credit.
NEWS
By Ed Waldman and Ed Waldman,SUN STAFF | December 22, 2004
WASHINGTON - Given a second chance, the return of Major League Baseball to the nation's capital became a virtual certainty yesterday after the District of Columbia Council passed a stadium financing bill without a provision that had threatened to kill the move a week earlier. By a vote of 7-6, with Chairman Linda W. Cropp siding with the majority, the council approved building a 41,000-seat stadium near the Anacostia River in southeast Washington. "I'm proud to say finally and at last we have risen above the fray, and the Washington Nationals are rounding third and heading for home," Mayor Anthony A. Williams said at a news conference last night.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2004
WASHINGTON - Mayor Anthony A. Williams and D.C. Council Chairman Linda W. Cropp reached an agreement last night that they expected to revive baseball's once-planned return to the city by altering the terms of a half-billion-dollar stadium-funding bill. The deal - the equivalent of a negotiating home run - was announced shortly before midnight. It still must be approved by the full council, which is meeting today. Baseball had appeared on track a few other times in recent weeks only to have the deal blow up - mostly because of Cropp's objections.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | November 12, 2004
WASHINGTON - Be it her D.C. Council meetings, her bridge club or her four-times-a-week treadmill workouts, Council chair Linda W. Cropp is a woman, her husband says, who "likes things all planned out." So how is it that the former high school guidance counselor finds herself on utterly unpredictable terrain as the leading player - a villain to some - in a drama over whether Washington can complete its stadium deal to secure a Major League Baseball team next year? For two days this week, Cropp seemed to be uncharacteristically conducting business on the fly as she offered first one plan, then another to try to cut the city's costs of building a stadium.
SPORTS
By Ed Waldman and Ed Waldman,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2004
WASHINGTON - With the rhetoric toned down from a contentious Tuesday, the chairwoman of the D.C. Council predicted yesterday that a baseball stadium financing bill will be approved well before Major League Baseball's Dec. 31 deadline. Linda W. Cropp, who Tuesday delayed a scheduled vote on the issue for two weeks, said she will use the time to explore alternatives that would reduce the amount of public financing needed for the $530 million stadium project. "If I had a prediction to make, I think what the mayor wants, what my colleagues want, with us moving forward with an opportunity to play ball, I think that will occur," she said.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | December 15, 2004
WASHINGTON - A divided D.C. Council balked at giving final approval last night to a half-billion-dollar stadium funding package needed to secure baseball's return to the city after 33 years. Rather than approve the package as expected, the Council continued to debate into the night. After nearly 12 hours of meeting, Council Chairman Linda Cropp, who was considered a critical vote on the package, said she couldn't support the deal because it relied too much on public money. "I cannot in good conscience vote for this bill with all of the public dollars there."
NEWS
November 3, 2003
On Friday, October 31, 2003, MARY CATHERINE (nee Cropp); beloved wife of Donald S. Fries; devoted mother of Donald Leo Fries and David Eric Fries and his wife Johnnie; loving grandmother of Tim Fries; dear sister of Worth Cropp, Jr. and Wilemma Cropp. Friends may call at the Witzke Funeral Home of Catonsville, Inc., 1630 Edmondson Avenue (1 mile west of beltway exit 14), on Monday from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 P.M. Services and interment will take place in Connellsville, PA at a later date. Those desiring may direct expressions of sympathy to the American Cancer Society.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2004
WASHINGTON - The amendment jeopardizing baseball's return to Washington was crafted with such stunning swiftness that Chris Bender, watching in the D.C. Council chamber, simply dropped his pager to the floor. "I was literally sending a text message and I just dropped it," said Bender, an aide to Mayor Anthony A. Williams. Bender sensed that D.C. Council Chairman Linda W. Cropp's measure could kill the baseball deal his boss had negotiated. Cobbled together even after Tuesday night's meeting had already begun, the amendment - requiring 50 percent private stadium financing - seemed to materialize out of thin air. But it has a story.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2004
WASHINGTON - Mayor Anthony A. Williams and D.C. Council Chairman Linda W. Cropp reached an agreement last night that they expected to revive baseball's once-planned return to the city by altering the terms of a half-billion-dollar stadium-funding bill. The deal - the equivalent of a negotiating home run - was announced shortly before midnight. It still must be approved by the full council, which is meeting today. Baseball had appeared on track a few other times in recent weeks only to have the deal blow up - mostly because of Cropp's objections.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | December 21, 2004
WASHINGTON - Mayor Anthony A. Williams and D.C. Council Chairman Linda W. Cropp reached an agreement last night that they expect to revive baseball's once-planned return to the city by altering the terms of a half-billion-dollar stadium-funding bill. The deal - the equivalent of a negotiating home run - was announced shortly before midnight. Major League Baseball officials were consulted about the latest compromise at regular intervals throughout the day. The latest agreement must be approved by the full council, which is meeting today.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2004
WASHINGTON - Advocates for preserving a Major League Baseball team said yesterday that their strategy involves trying to convince D.C. Council Chairman Linda W. Cropp that the city is committed to attracting private stadium financing on its own without being required to do so. The mayor's office, the D.C. Sports and Entertainment Commission and business leaders with the Greater Washington Board of Trade all are trying to convince Cropp to drop a requirement...
SPORTS
By Ed Waldman and Ed Waldman,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2004
The official deadline for Washington to pass stadium funding legislation that is acceptable to Major League Baseball may be Dec. 31, but in reality, fans will likely know whether there will be baseball in the district next season much sooner. Tuesday to be exact. With the D.C. Council scheduled to go into recess Thursday, district officials are scurrying to craft a proposal that can be voted on during the council's last scheduled meeting of the year. Earlier this week, the council approved funding for a new stadium for the recently re-named Washington Nationals, but with an amendment proposed by Chairman Linda W. Cropp that called for private financing for half the construction costs.
SPORTS
By Ed Waldman | December 16, 2004
Linda W. Cropp, chairman of the D.C. Council: Her amendment may have killed baseball in Washington. Can she be won over? Anthony A. Williams, mayor of Washington: Brokered the original deal with Major League Baseball. Can he get MLB officials back to the table? Jack Evans, D.C. Council member: The mayor's biggest ally on the council. He seemed to have smoothed over the last flap between Williams and Cropp. Can he do it again? Bob DuPuy, COO of Major League Baseball: Led the two-year search that brought the Expos to Washington - or so it seemed.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | December 16, 2004
WASHINGTON - On the day Washington's new ballclub was to have unveiled its uniforms, Major League Baseball ordered the team instead yesterday to immediately shut down its business and promotional activities because of a D.C. Council-passed amendment that baseball said violates a commitment the city made to fund a stadium. The amendment, hastily crafted by council Chairman Linda W. Cropp and approved late Tuesday night, is "wholly unacceptable," Major League Baseball's president and chief operating officer, Bob DuPuy, said in a statement.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2004
WASHINGTON - Advocates for preserving a Major League Baseball team said yesterday that their strategy involves trying to convince D.C. Council Chairman Linda W. Cropp that the city is committed to attracting private stadium financing on its own without being required to do so. The mayor's office, the D.C. Sports and Entertainment Commission and business leaders with the Greater Washington Board of Trade all are trying to convince Cropp to drop a requirement...
SPORTS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 16, 2004
WASHINGTON - D.C. Council Chairman Linda W. Cropp seems an unlikely target for sports radio rage, what with her coordinating necklace-earring sets and quiet reputation for consensus-building. But yesterday, the genteel sponsor of what is now being called "the killer amendment" - a measure that threatens to drive Major League Baseball from the District after the city has gone for more than three decades without a team - predicted her newfound fame among drive-time DJs and sports fans. "I suspect I'm going to be tarred and feathered and vilified by all of sports media and sports radio," she told reporters, "because their job is to bring sports here."
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