Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCrop Genetics
IN THE NEWS

Crop Genetics

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | December 19, 1992
Crop Genetics Inc. said yesterday that it has found a British agricultural chemical company to help take its biological pesticide to market.ICI Agrochemicals, a division of Imperial Chemical Industries, has agreed to do large-scale field testing of a vaccine against the European corn borer, a product that has been under development by Crop Genetics for more than five years.The agreement with ICI replaced an earlier pact with DeKalb Genetics Corp. of DeKalb, Ill. That company backed away from its alliance with Hanover-based Crop Genetics yesterday, saying it preferred to develop its own genetically engineered plant that would be resistant to the corn borer.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | January 26, 2007
Dr. Maimon M. Cohen, a leader in the development of medical genetics and first director of the Harvey Institute for Human Genetics at Greater Baltimore Medical Center, died of gastric cancer yesterday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Pikesville resident was 72. In 1997, Dr. Cohen joined GBMC as director of the genetics center that conducts research on adult diseases with genetic links, such as diabetes, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, some types of cancer and heart disease. "Dr. Maimon Cohen was an incredible leader and a wonderful human being.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | December 28, 1991
Crop Genetics International of Hanover took a big step toward making itself a commercial biotechnology company yesterday when it announced a partnership with chemical giant Du Pont to develop and sell Crop Genetics' insecticides made from viruses retrieved from dead bugs.The deal calls for Wilmington, Del.-based Du Pont to pump $3.75 million into Crop Genetics over the next two years. Crop Genetics will work on researching and manufacturing new insecticides, while Du Pont will also do research and will handle the field testing and marketing of the products.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | August 15, 1995
Even as it cut its loss by 24.9 percent with a jump in the sales of its biological pesticides, Biosys Inc. continued to bleed red ink during the second quarter, making its financial condition shakier."
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | November 16, 1993
Crop Genetics International Inc. of Columbia said yesterday that one of its most important experimental pesticides failed in field trials this summer, which the company's chief executive said doesn't change the company's short-term outlook but robs it of a possible "home run" down the road.The company's InCide pesticide was designed to kill the corn borer, a pest that consumes corn crops, company Chief Executive Joseph W. Kelly said. Tests in Iowa and Nebraska showed that InCide controlled bug infestations but failed to boost corn yields -- making the product commercially useless as a pesticide despite its bug-killing success.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | March 28, 1993
Hanover -- Inside the towers of corporate America, researc divisions have proper, authoritative titles. But at Crop Genetics International Corp., managers call the guys with the bright ideas "the wacko group." The wizard: chief scientist Peter S. Carlson, who left a university lab in 1981 to found a company that applies genetic engineering to agriculture.Throughout this unpretentious, no-neckties company, the mantra is speed and flexibility. Executives decry stodgy companies that can't react swiftly to new opportunities.
BUSINESS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,Evening Sun Staff | September 24, 1991
Crop Genetics International, the Hanover-based developer of biological pest-control systems, announced today an agreement to acquire Espro, Inc., a Columbia company founded four years ago by a former Crop Genetics employee.Espro develops processes to produce naturally occurring organisms that can infect and destroy targeted insects. The organisms, unlike chemical pesticides, do not harm beneficial insects, wildlife or humans. Espro is developing economical ways of producing the organisms -- something that has so far eluded researchers elsewhere.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Timothy J. Mullaney and Ross Hetrick and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writers | December 10, 1994
In the further consolidation of the struggling biotechnology industry, Crop Genetics International Corp. of Columbia has agreed to merge with biosys Inc. of Palo Alto, Calif., in a stock swap valued at $11.4 million.The acquisition of Crop Genetics recalls the 1992 purchase of Nova Pharmaceutical Corp. of Baltimore by Scios Inc. of Mountain View, Calif. Since then, most of Nova's local operations have been shut down, although the merged Scios Nova Inc. spun off Baltimore-based Guilford Pharmaceuticals Inc.But both Crop Genetics and state officials yesterday were emphatic that Crop Genetics' operations won't leave the state.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | December 9, 1992
DuPont Agricultural Products has decided to pump $2 million into Crop Genetics International Corp. to help the company commercialize several products to protect garden vegetables and orchards from insects, the companies said yesterday.A year ago, the two companies formed an alliance to begin producing insecticidal viruses, and Crop Genetics, a Hanover-based biotech company, began renovating a 75,500-square-foot manufacturing facility in Columbia.The company hopes the Environmental Protection Agency gives its approval soon to begin marketing the products and that manufacturing will begin by September 1993,said Joseph Kelly, Crop Genetics' chief executive.
BUSINESS
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,Staff Writer | July 30, 1993
Crop Genetics International said yesterday it has granted exclusive marketing rights for its proprietary sugar cane seed cane, Kleentek, to Helena Chemical Co.In the initial phase, Helena will market CGI's seed in Louisiana in exchange for a share of the profits. In 1996, Helena would have the option to become an equal partner with Crop Genetics in the production and sale of Kleentek in exchange for a substantial capital investment.Crop Genetics, a biotechnology company based in Columbia, reported $1.4 million in direct sales of Kleentek, its only product on the domestic market, last year.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Sun Staff Writer | May 2, 1995
Cash-strapped biosys inc., which acquired Columbia-based Crop Genetics Inc. in March, announced yesterday that it had signed an agreement to merge with another biological pesticide maker, Salt Lake City-based AgriDyne Technologies Inc.The merger is subject to approval by shareholders of both companies and clearance by the Securities and Exchange Commission.The proposed merger won't affect biosys' plan to move its headquarters from Palo Alto, Calif. to Crop Genetics' Columbia facility in September, said Bruce G. Fielding Jr., senior vice president and CFO of biosys.
BUSINESS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe | February 26, 1995
Lockheed's Cannestra will retire in MarchThe president of Lockheed Corp.'s Aeronautical Systems Group -- and the expected president of the aeronautics division of a merged Lockheed and Martin Marietta Corp. -- will retire effective March 15.Kenneth W. Cannestra will be succeeded by James A. "Micky" Blackwell, president of Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Co. at Marietta, Ga. The Aeronautical Systems Group includes Lockheed plants at Marietta; Forth Worth, Texas; and Palmdale, Calif.Daniel M. Tellep, Lockheed's chairman and chief executive officer, said Mr. Cannestra, 64, decided to retire in advance of the company's required retirement at age 65.The federal government last month approved the merger of Martin Marietta and Lockheed -- a $10 billion marriage that will make Maryland home to the nation's largest defense contractor.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | February 16, 1995
The California biotechnology company slated to buy Crop Genetics International of Hanover next month is dangerously low on cash, and its accountants have questioned its ability to continue as a going concern if the company's operating profits and balance sheet don't improve soon.Biosys inc. made the disclosure in a registration statement filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. The company said it had $2.3 million in cash and short-term investments as of Dec. 31, down from $14.7 million a year earlier.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1995
Crop GeneticsInternational Corp.* ... ... ... ... Ticker ... ... YesterdayColumbia ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Symbol ... ... Cls. ... Chg.... ... ... ... ... ... .. .. .. .. CROP ... .. .. .21/32 ... Unch.Period ended12/31 ... ... ... ... ... .. .. .. 4th qtr. ... ... Year ago ... Chg.Revenue ... ... ... ... ... ... .. $182 ... ... ... $704 .. ... -74.1%Net Income ... ... ... ... ... ... $(2,264)** .. .. $(1,286) ... --Primary EPS ... ... ... ... ... .. $(0.26)** ... .. $(0.24) ... --...
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | January 27, 1995
Drawn by state incentives and the quality of life in Howard County, a California biotechnology company yesterday announced that it would move its headquarters to Maryland after it completes the acquisition of Columbia-based Crop Genetics International Corp.But the move, to be completed by the fall, will involve an undetermined number of layoffs at Crop Genetics' Columbia location, which has 60 workers, as well as at Biosys Inc.'s 40-person Palo Alto operations, which will be closed.The number of workers in Columbia will increase, Biosys said, but some of the jobs will be filled by transferred Californians.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Timothy J. Mullaney and Ross Hetrick and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writers | December 10, 1994
In the further consolidation of the struggling biotechnology industry, Crop Genetics International Corp. of Columbia has agreed to merge with biosys Inc. of Palo Alto, Calif., in a stock swap valued at $11.4 million.The acquisition of Crop Genetics recalls the 1992 purchase of Nova Pharmaceutical Corp. of Baltimore by Scios Inc. of Mountain View, Calif. Since then, most of Nova's local operations have been shut down, although the merged Scios Nova Inc. spun off Baltimore-based Guilford Pharmaceuticals Inc.But both Crop Genetics and state officials yesterday were emphatic that Crop Genetics' operations won't leave the state.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | April 10, 1992
Crop Genetics International Corp. said yesterday that it plans to raise about $20 million in a stock offering to renovate a building that will become its research laboratories and manufacturing facility.The Hanover-based company, which develops ways to protect crops from pests, insects and weeds, expects to offer 3.5 million common shares to the public to raise the funds within the next six weeks, Chief Executive Joseph W. Kelly said.Under an agreement with Du Pont Co., Crop Genetics will manufacture natural viruses that could gain widespread use by replacing pesticides made of synthetic chemicals, which pose a risk of water and soil pollution.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | September 30, 1994
After a nearly three-year relationship with Du Pont that brought it $3.75 million in development money, Crop Genetics International Corp. has called it quits with the giant chemical company, saying it wants a network of distributors that will aggressively sell its biological insecticides."
BUSINESS
April 30, 1994
Boeing OKs $75 million settlementBoeing Co. said yesterday it will pay $75 million to settle disputes with the government over how much of certain overhead costs can be charged to government contracts.The settlement covers every government contract Boeing has worked on over the past 14 years -- from the F-22 fighter to the space station to computer services for the Social Security Administration, a Boeing spokesman said.According to the Justice Department, the settlement resolves three issues, the most significant of which concerned allegations that Boeing improperly charged millions of dollars in research and development costs to government contracts.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.