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November 6, 2013
The final game in a driving rain that decided the Girls Soccer IAAM A Conference was a treat to watch ( "No. 1 McDonogh girls soccer beats No. 4 Spalding for IAAM A Conference title," Nov. 2). Both teams and their fans were well behaved and well represented. However, the quote from Spalding's Coach Ashly Kennedy was shocking: "To be honest, McDonogh brings talent, we have blue-collar kids, etc. " What was he saying? The implication is that Spalding students can't compete because their families aren't rich and they live on the wrong side of the tracks.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2014
Alerted by a phone call one recent Sunday, Stephen Pieper drove his black pickup the few miles from his farm in White Hall to Monkton, where he arrived too late to stop a man from plowing under the corn on 95 acres of land he'd leased for decades. Pieper, who leases more than 1,000 acres in Baltimore and Harford counties, said $100,000 worth of corn was destroyed by the farm's new owner — the CEO of Hunt Valley-based Sinclair Broadcast Group. David Smith, who heads the nation's largest independent TV broadcast company, had no choice, his attorney said.
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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2011
As Jamie Brown shifts his gaze upward and squints at a pair of tall barns backed by a cloudless October sky, the reverence in his voice is nearly as clear as the autumn sun's rays. All around him at Triadelphia Lake View Farm, families are taking advantage of an unusually pretty day to pet farm animals, take hayrides and pick pumpkins. Layers of peeling red paint on the barns distinguish the two oldest structures on the 100-acre Glenelg farm at the end of meandering Triadelphia Road.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
The long, cold winter was good to farmers and gardeners as frigid temperatures and blankets of snow helped kill pests and moisten soil. So when spring arrived, early bloomers surged to life. Then came plunging temperatures, frost and even snow Tuesday and Wednesday nights. The winter already almost certainly means Marylanders will have to wait a few weeks longer than normal for a peach cake or strawberry shortcake topped with local produce. Now farmers are nervously waiting to learn whether two late-season frosts could damage or kill significant portions of blooming plum and peach trees, which are flowering now and particularly vulnerable to cold.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 31, 1990
LOS ANGELES -- The cold snap that has devastated this year's California citrus crop could also dramatically curtail the number of lemons, oranges and avocados produced next year, farmers and agricultural officials said yesterday.Some farmers expect their citrus production to be half of normal next year because the persistent cold weather is killing young orange and lemon trees and decimating new growth on older citrus trees.Avocado production in Tulare County is likely to be wiped out completely for 1991, said the county agricultural commissioner, Lenord Craft.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Writer | July 22, 1994
Connoisseurs of the peach may be disappointed this year -- tasty, locally grown peaches are in short supply.According to the Maryland Department of Agriculture, two-thirds of the state peach harvest -- which would be coming to market just about this time -- fell victim to a brutal January freeze that destroyed tree buds early in their development.Most of the crop in Carroll, Frederick and Washington counties -- the state's main peach-growing region -- "was wiped out," M. Bruce West, head of the department's crop reporting service, said yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2000
"This could be my best crop ever," Joe Mullhausen said yesterday morning as he disappeared into a thicket of dark green corn stalks towering 10 feet, maybe 12 feet, above the ground. Mullhausen, 70, a stocky, white-haired farmer, planted 130 acres of field corn this year at his home farm near Prospect and on rented land in northeastern Harford County. He said the ears are longer, thicker and the kernels are deeper. "I doubt that I will live long enough to see a better crop than this," he said.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Sun Staff Correspondent | April 17, 1991
WAYSON'S CORNER -- Claude McKee scanned the crowd of 200 or more that gathered at the sprawling Triangle Tobacco Warehouse for the opening session of the annual Southern Maryland tobacco auction and said that he had never seen so many people at previous sales."
NEWS
By Jen DeGregorio and Jen DeGregorio,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | March 28, 2004
Amish farmers from Cecil County were among those attending the opening of last week's tobacco auction in Charles County, where the Farmers and Hughesville warehouses are the state's only remaining tobacco auction sites. Although the number of tobacco farmers has fallen in almost every county since Maryland started its buyout of farmers in 2001, the number is increasing in Cecil County, traditionally a nontobacco area. The reason is the Amish. Amish tobacco farmers - who for religious reasons do not participate in government programs - have crossed the Pennsylvania border into Cecil to try their luck at tobacco in Maryland.
BUSINESS
By SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE | December 30, 1998
As temperatures rose yesterday, California's Central Valley orange growers were in a sunnier mood after initial inspections showed that last week's big chill may have spared more of their crop than they first feared.Instead of facing catastrophic losses, farmers were cautiously optimistic that they might be able to salvage 50 percent or more of their crops. That could be good news in the long run for consumers, who nevertheless face a short-term spike in orange prices at the supermarket as soon as today.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2014
Sunny Sighed remembers her first exposure to modern burlesque very well. She loved it, but never dreamed she'd soon be a part of it. Stripping off her clothes in front of an audience - well, even for a performer trained in acting, singing and dancing, that seemed a bit much. "I at first could not imagine being able to do it myself," she says of the night about eight years ago when she first saw local legends Trixie Little and the Evil Hate Monkey (real names: Beatrix Burneston and Adam Krandle)
NEWS
March 14, 2014
Sunday, March 16 Jazz Larry Scott & Friends take the stage at 7 p.m. for "Sunday Supper & Jazz" at 49 West St. $20 cover. For reservations and more information, call 410-626-9796. Tuesday, March 18 Workshop The Field Crops & Pasture IPM Workshop will take place from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Anne Arundel County Extension Office, 97 Dairy Lane in Gambrills. Workshop will explore advanced concepts of pasture and field crop production in the Southern Maryland region from establishment to harvest, including animal utilization.
NEWS
rbenjes@theaegis.com | March 12, 2014
As taken from the pages of The Aegis dated Thursday, March 12, 1964: Residents were urged 50 years ago not to get alarmed if they noticed four foot squares painted in white on highways or in fields. The Harford County Metropolitan Commission hired Maps Inc. of Dundalk to take aerial photographs of the county from 3,000 feet. The square markers were placed at 130 different locations in the county by the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. Once complete, the aerial maps could be put together and elevations could be better recorded.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 26, 2013
— Oysters may or may not be an aphrodisiac, but they sure bring out passion in those who raise them for a living. Tim Devine barely knew from oysters when he was growing up in Easton, not far from the Chesapeake Bay. Now he's growing them on 10 acres of bay bottom near here that he's leased from the state, and professing to love the hard work and challenges involved in cultivating and selling his prized bivalves. "It just seemed like the stars aligned," Devine, 37, said of his transition from commercial photographer in New York City to yeoman oyster farmer.
NEWS
November 6, 2013
The final game in a driving rain that decided the Girls Soccer IAAM A Conference was a treat to watch ( "No. 1 McDonogh girls soccer beats No. 4 Spalding for IAAM A Conference title," Nov. 2). Both teams and their fans were well behaved and well represented. However, the quote from Spalding's Coach Ashly Kennedy was shocking: "To be honest, McDonogh brings talent, we have blue-collar kids, etc. " What was he saying? The implication is that Spalding students can't compete because their families aren't rich and they live on the wrong side of the tracks.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2013
Nothing says Halloween like a pumpkin, and dozens of Maryland farmers are grateful for that. The orange harbingers of fall bring crowds to farm stands and pick-your-own fields. They're the centerpiece around which some farms have built themselves into "agritourism" destinations, with hayrides, corn mazes and other kid-friendly activities. Now the crush is on. And in much of the state - fortunately for farmers - the pumpkin harvest is good this year. "The dry weather we had in August and September were great for the pumpkins," said Brad Milton, a farmer who owns Brad's Produce in Harford County with wife Karin.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 8, 1993
FAHANE, Somalia -- Until a few weeks ago, Haji Shekhey Abdi's people were facing starvation. Civil war combatants had stolen their cattle, their tractors and their food. Terrorized villagers were afraid to work in the fields or take their produce to market.But Mr. Abdi, his four children, six grandchildren and the rest of the village recently brought in a crop of corn, their first in two years. As they have for centuries, they thanked the god of Islam. But this year they also thanked the United States.
BUSINESS
By John Schmeltzer and John Schmeltzer,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 21, 2004
Wholesale coffee prices perked to a four-year high last week after warnings that an ebb in crop cycles compounded by weather problems in Brazil, which produces nearly 30 percent of the world's crop, could cut the harvest significantly next year. For American consumers, the increase set off rapid-fire price increases as large as 14 percent by the nation's three largest coffee roasters - Folger's parent Procter & Gamble Co., Maxwell House-maker Kraft Foods Inc. and Sara Lee Corp., which makes Hills Brothers, Chock Full O'Nuts and MJB. The upward pressure is expected to continue, with coffee futures jumping to more than $1 a pound after the forecast of supply shortages by the London-based International Coffee Organization.
NEWS
Svanessen2@hotmail.com | September 11, 2013
Who says people in the suburban neighborhoods in our area can't grow prize-winning vegetables? Rose Marie Fury walked away with 27 ribbons from the Maryland State Fair this year. Nine of the ribbons were for her homegrown vegetables including purple potatoes, red potatoes, red onions and sweet onions, all of which she grew in her backyard garden that is roughly 25 feet by 45 feet. And Fury's talent extends beyond gardening. She also won in the food preservation and baked goods and candy divisions.
NEWS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2013
Gina Riley staked out a spot near the finish line long before the crowds arrived at the Timonium Fairground race track Sunday. She put a blanket on the ground, parked a cooler nearby and sat in the shade of the grandstand. She thought of her son, Bryce, who would have turned 34 Friday. Riley and her husband, Todd Tracey, make this trip every year in honor of Bryce, who had spent his life fighting dermatomyositis, a rare muscle and tissue disease that prevented him from going on rides at the Maryland Fair.
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