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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | February 14, 2007
Dale Coleman Sr., a 1960s and 1970s rock guitarist who created an act where he set his arms on fire, died Friday of Crohn's disease at Bon Secours Hospital. The Loch Raven Village resident was 62. "He was one of the greatest guitar players I was ever associated with," said band leader Tom Stauch of Abingdon, better known as Tommy Vann. "He patterned himself after Jimi Hendrix, but Dale was always distinct and unique. Long before Hendrix, he was doing wild things with the guitar." Born in Baltimore and raised in Timonium, Mr. Coleman began playing music while attending Dulaney High School.
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NEWS
August 9, 2009
$30,000 raised to fight Crohn's disease, colitis Funds raised to fight against Crohn's disease and colitis were collected by employees of Sandy Spring Bank in Olney. More than $30,000 was raised through the support of family members, friends and clients. In addition, on June 20 about 100 employees and family members walked in the "Take Steps to be Heard" event held by the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation (CCFA) at the Tidal Basin in Washington. Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease that affects about 600,000 people in the United States, many in their teens.
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NEWS
August 9, 2009
$30,000 raised to fight Crohn's disease, colitis Funds raised to fight against Crohn's disease and colitis were collected by employees of Sandy Spring Bank in Olney. More than $30,000 was raised through the support of family members, friends and clients. In addition, on June 20 about 100 employees and family members walked in the "Take Steps to be Heard" event held by the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation (CCFA) at the Tidal Basin in Washington. Crohn's disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease that affects about 600,000 people in the United States, many in their teens.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | January 4, 2008
Osiris Therapeutics Inc. said yesterday that it has won a $224.7 million contract from the Defense Department to develop and stockpile Prochymal, its adult stem cell therapy, to treat gastrointestinal damage caused by radiation exposure. Prochymal, which is made from mesenchymal stem cells found in adult bone marrow, is in late-stage human clinical trials for other uses, including the treatment of Crohn's disease. The government will pay Columbia-based Osiris and its partner, Cambridge, Mass.
NEWS
November 7, 2004
Centennial Park walk today is to benefit Crohn's foundation The second "Miles for Miracles Pace Setter Walk," to benefit the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America, is being held today at Centennial Park. Registration is scheduled at 8:30 a.m.; warm-up with a certified fitness instructor is slated at 9:15 a.m. The walk is to start at 9:30 a.m. The event is being organized by Centennial High School students Carrie Gartner and Shayna Meliker, both 15. The girls created the event last year in honor of their former teacher at Beth Shalom Religious School, Chaya Solomon, and Carrie's uncle, Melvin Oberfeld, both of whom are affected by Crohn's disease.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT and MILTON KENT,SUN COLUMNIST | May 19, 2006
Doctors told Sonya Gross that the nausea and cramps and vomiting her son, Old Mill senior running back and sprinter Ryan Callahan, was experiencing were likely due to the nerves and stress attached to being a high school senior. That seemed like a reasonable diagnosis, since a kid's senior year, the year kids get the first taste of adulthood and all the life-shaping decisions that come with it, is the most important and most nerve-racking of their lives. But Gross knew her son better than anyone, and she knew there had to be some other reason to explain the pains Callahan was feeling on a regular basis.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | September 14, 2007
Corinne Langer, 13, spent much of last weekend on her sofa watching viedos and just being a "couch potato," but not for the usual reasons a teenager might have. The Clarksville resident has Crohn's disease, a chronic digestive illness, and she was just too tired to do anything more. Yet, she will be walking in the fifth Miles for Miracles event at Centennial Park on Sunday to raise money to benefit the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America, and she invites the public to join her. Despite her diagnosis almost two years ago, Corinne said she can handle the disease and almost anything else.
FEATURES
By Amber Dance and Amber Dance,Los Angeles Times | September 13, 2007
Daniel Gray's stomach tells a story. The gnarled lines across his abdomen are the mementos of three surgeries on his digestive system. The slashes along each side are reminders of the time the stitches broke and the doctors put him into a drug-induced coma for seven weeks, keeping his abdomen open for repeated washes. The doctors made the slits so that they would have enough skin to stretch over the opening when they sewed him together. Gray, 46, was diagnosed 24 years ago with Crohn's disease, a chronic inflammation of the bowel and intestines that afflicts nearly 1 million people worldwide.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | February 21, 2007
After disappointing drug results and a stock downgrade from a major financial firm, Osiris Therapeutics Inc. detailed yesterday how it doubled its loss last year, blaming increased clinical trial efforts and charges associated with its initial public offering of stock in August. Loss for the year was $45 million, compared with $20 million in 2005. For the quarter that ended Dec. 31, the company lost $12.7 million, compared with $8.1 million for the final quarter of 2005. The earnings information, first detailed in a news release late Monday and then discussed during a conference call with analysts yesterday morning, didn't do much to move investors.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | April 1, 1996
A children's concert at the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall yesterday featuring ventriloquist Shari Lewis and her sidekick Lamb Chop, raised about $100,000 for the Crohn's Disease and Colitis Foundation of America in Maryland, a foundation spokeswoman said.The foundation is the onlyy nonprofit health organization dedicated solely to serving people with Crohn's disease and ulcerated colitis, also known as inflammatory bowel disease.Pub Date: 4/01/96
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg | September 14, 2007
Corinne Langer, 13, spent much of last weekend on her sofa watching viedos and just being a "couch potato," but not for the usual reasons a teenager might have. The Clarksville resident has Crohn's disease, a chronic digestive illness, and she was just too tired to do anything more. Yet, she will be walking in the fifth Miles for Miracles event at Centennial Park on Sunday to raise money to benefit the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America, and she invites the public to join her. Despite her diagnosis almost two years ago, Corinne said she can handle the disease and almost anything else.
FEATURES
By Amber Dance and Amber Dance,Los Angeles Times | September 13, 2007
Daniel Gray's stomach tells a story. The gnarled lines across his abdomen are the mementos of three surgeries on his digestive system. The slashes along each side are reminders of the time the stitches broke and the doctors put him into a drug-induced coma for seven weeks, keeping his abdomen open for repeated washes. The doctors made the slits so that they would have enough skin to stretch over the opening when they sewed him together. Gray, 46, was diagnosed 24 years ago with Crohn's disease, a chronic inflammation of the bowel and intestines that afflicts nearly 1 million people worldwide.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | February 21, 2007
After disappointing drug results and a stock downgrade from a major financial firm, Osiris Therapeutics Inc. detailed yesterday how it doubled its loss last year, blaming increased clinical trial efforts and charges associated with its initial public offering of stock in August. Loss for the year was $45 million, compared with $20 million in 2005. For the quarter that ended Dec. 31, the company lost $12.7 million, compared with $8.1 million for the final quarter of 2005. The earnings information, first detailed in a news release late Monday and then discussed during a conference call with analysts yesterday morning, didn't do much to move investors.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | February 14, 2007
Dale Coleman Sr., a 1960s and 1970s rock guitarist who created an act where he set his arms on fire, died Friday of Crohn's disease at Bon Secours Hospital. The Loch Raven Village resident was 62. "He was one of the greatest guitar players I was ever associated with," said band leader Tom Stauch of Abingdon, better known as Tommy Vann. "He patterned himself after Jimi Hendrix, but Dale was always distinct and unique. Long before Hendrix, he was doing wild things with the guitar." Born in Baltimore and raised in Timonium, Mr. Coleman began playing music while attending Dulaney High School.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,Sun Reporter | October 27, 2006
An international scientific team, including a group from the Johns Hopkins University, has pinpointed an unexpected gene mutation that appears to confer protection against Crohn's disease in some patients. The finding potentially paves the way for new diagnostic tools and drugs to treat the debilitating intestinal condition, which affects more than 500,000 people in the U.S. "This is an exciting piece of work," said Dr. Scott Snapper, a Crohn's disease researcher at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston who was not involved in the study.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun reporter | October 20, 2006
For 13 days this summer - one day for each year he'd lived with the chronic pain and fatigue of Crohn's disease - Robert Gagne gleefully rode his pearl-white Yamaha Road Star nearly 5,000 miles through 17 states, sometimes logging 12 hours on the motorcycle. He saw Mount Rushmore and Colorado's Estes Park. He woke up one July morning in Rapid City, S.D., and went to bed 693 miles away in La Crosse, Wis. And on his many stops, he didn't once turn to the local Yellow Pages to look up the nearest emergency room, as he was used to doing for many years.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,Special to the Sun; King Features Syndicate | January 12, 2003
Do you have any natural remedies for insomnia? I have suddenly become unable to sleep at night. I drink hot milk before I go to bed, but it doesn't help. I just lie there, watching the minutes tick past. I never had this problem before. As soon as my head hit the pillow, I was asleep. I hesitate to take sleeping pills. Taking a hot bath at least an hour before bedtime might be helpful. As your body cools down, it triggers chemical messengers that promote drowsiness. A high-carbohydrate snack like cereal, crackers or cookies before bed can also help.
BUSINESS
By Allison Connolly and Allison Connolly,Sun reporter | January 4, 2008
Osiris Therapeutics Inc. said yesterday that it has won a $224.7 million contract from the Defense Department to develop and stockpile Prochymal, its adult stem cell therapy, to treat gastrointestinal damage caused by radiation exposure. Prochymal, which is made from mesenchymal stem cells found in adult bone marrow, is in late-stage human clinical trials for other uses, including the treatment of Crohn's disease. The government will pay Columbia-based Osiris and its partner, Cambridge, Mass.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT and MILTON KENT,SUN COLUMNIST | May 19, 2006
Doctors told Sonya Gross that the nausea and cramps and vomiting her son, Old Mill senior running back and sprinter Ryan Callahan, was experiencing were likely due to the nerves and stress attached to being a high school senior. That seemed like a reasonable diagnosis, since a kid's senior year, the year kids get the first taste of adulthood and all the life-shaping decisions that come with it, is the most important and most nerve-racking of their lives. But Gross knew her son better than anyone, and she knew there had to be some other reason to explain the pains Callahan was feeling on a regular basis.
NEWS
November 7, 2004
Centennial Park walk today is to benefit Crohn's foundation The second "Miles for Miracles Pace Setter Walk," to benefit the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America, is being held today at Centennial Park. Registration is scheduled at 8:30 a.m.; warm-up with a certified fitness instructor is slated at 9:15 a.m. The walk is to start at 9:30 a.m. The event is being organized by Centennial High School students Carrie Gartner and Shayna Meliker, both 15. The girls created the event last year in honor of their former teacher at Beth Shalom Religious School, Chaya Solomon, and Carrie's uncle, Melvin Oberfeld, both of whom are affected by Crohn's disease.
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