Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCrofoot
IN THE NEWS

Crofoot

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
Vivian L. Crofoot, an Elkridge homemaker who never lost her affection for West Virginia, where she was raised, died Sunday of heart failure at Seasons Hospice at Northwest Hospital. She was 91. The daughter of Charles Brown, a coal miner, and Dora Brown, a homemaker, the former Vivian Lucille Brown was born one of 11 children in Beaver, Ohio. She later moved with her family to Northfolk, W.Va., when her father took a job there as a miner. She was a 1940 graduate of Northfolk High School.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
Vivian L. Crofoot, an Elkridge homemaker who never lost her affection for West Virginia, where she was raised, died Sunday of heart failure at Seasons Hospice at Northwest Hospital. She was 91. The daughter of Charles Brown, a coal miner, and Dora Brown, a homemaker, the former Vivian Lucille Brown was born one of 11 children in Beaver, Ohio. She later moved with her family to Northfolk, W.Va., when her father took a job there as a miner. She was a 1940 graduate of Northfolk High School.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Staff Writer | August 6, 1995
Timothy Francis Crofoot, who grudgingly left a career in musical theater to become one of the key figures in the State Highway Administration, died Thursday of an AIDS-related illness his home near Aberdeen. He was 32.In the late '80s, Mr. Crofoot, a self-taught piano player, was well known in the Baltimore and Washington area for orchestrating theater productions. Among other venues, he did arrangements at Toby's in Columbia, the White Marsh Dinner Theatre and Theater on the Hill at Western Maryland College.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2013
Ernest B. Crofoot, a former labor organizer who later headed Council 67 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, died Friday of complications from cancer at his Annapolis home. He was 88. "Ernie was one hell of a trade unionist," said Ed A. Mohler, who went to work for Mr. Crofoot at AFSCME in 1968. "He put together a first-class staff at AFSCME and had people from the United Auto Workers, machinists, building trades and other unions who had a variety of experiences.
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 5, 1998
NEW YORK -- Shuttling between the Bonnard and Edward Burne-Jones art exhibits a few weeks ago, I walked to the western edge of Manhattan (Ninth Avenue and 42nd Street) to catch a much-recommended theater piece called "Nijinsky Speaks."An off-off-Broadway, one-man performance, it's not as unique as the producers and critics are proclaiming, but it has been extended through Nov. 22 at the Harold Clurman Theater.The story of the virtuoso art and tormented life of Vaslav Nijinsky (1889-1950) is told by Leonard Crofoot, a Broadway dancer who originated the role of Tom Thumb in "Barnum."
NEWS
By Kevin Harrison | April 24, 1994
Pete and Elise Crofoot of Glen BurnieVolunteer work: About 15 to 25 multiple sclerosis patients meet each Friday at the Fair Lanes Southdale in Pasadena, from autumn to mid-spring, to enjoy a few hours of bowling. Mr. and Mrs. Crofoot are among the volunteers who help the bowlers.Known as the Hopeful Wheelers, the group has been meeting for 26 years. Mrs. Crofoot has been volunteering with the group for more than 20 years. Her husband, Pete, has been with the group since he retired in 1988.
NEWS
December 5, 1994
Jenevieve Crofoot-HessPimlico residentJenevieve Crofoot-Hess, a longtime resident of Pimlico and member of the Order of the Eastern Star for more than 65 years, died Friday of heart failure at the Maryland Masonic Home in Cockeysville. She was 92.She joined the order in 1925 and was part of a fund-raising effort in the late 1920s to build the Masonic home, also known as Bonnie Blink. Construction on the Tudor-style buildings began in 1931 and the first guests were received in 1934.Illness forced her to move to the retirement community's health care facility last year.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Staff Writer | October 3, 1993
Harford County will pay more than $300,000 of overtime in a settlement reached with 128 employees of the sheriff's office who were required to be at work 15 minutes early for roll call even though the sheriff had ordered the policy dropped in December 1990.The settlement includes active, retired and former nonunion deputies and other Detention Center personnel, including correctional officers and nurses employed between February 1989 and April 1992.The average payment to each person is about $2,000, said Ernest A. Crofoot, attorney for the county.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2004
City officials must release an investigative report detailing police Commissioner Kevin P. Clark's domestic dispute from earlier this year, a Baltimore judge ruled yesterday. Circuit Judge Joseph H.H. Kaplan decided that the investigation, conducted by Howard County police, should not be "shielded from public view." He said he will sign an order forcing Mayor Martin O'Malley to release the records Monday, but a spokesman for the mayor said the city plans an immediate appeal. In his ruling, Kaplan rejected the city's argument that the result of the two-week investigation is a personnel matter.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | January 8, 1991
Two strange political bedfellows -- labor and management -- are joining together during this session of the state General Assembly to fight a common foe -- soaring medical costs.The Maryland Chamber of Commerce and the Maryland-D.C. AFL-CIO yesterday unveiled a set of legislative proposals that they say will help stem the rise in medical fees not regulated by state agencies."This is more than just a start. It's a great step towards a resolution," said Ed Mohler, president of the Maryland-D.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2004
City officials must release an investigative report detailing police Commissioner Kevin P. Clark's domestic dispute from earlier this year, a Baltimore judge ruled yesterday. Circuit Judge Joseph H.H. Kaplan decided that the investigation, conducted by Howard County police, should not be "shielded from public view." He said he will sign an order forcing Mayor Martin O'Malley to release the records Monday, but a spokesman for the mayor said the city plans an immediate appeal. In his ruling, Kaplan rejected the city's argument that the result of the two-week investigation is a personnel matter.
FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 5, 1998
NEW YORK -- Shuttling between the Bonnard and Edward Burne-Jones art exhibits a few weeks ago, I walked to the western edge of Manhattan (Ninth Avenue and 42nd Street) to catch a much-recommended theater piece called "Nijinsky Speaks."An off-off-Broadway, one-man performance, it's not as unique as the producers and critics are proclaiming, but it has been extended through Nov. 22 at the Harold Clurman Theater.The story of the virtuoso art and tormented life of Vaslav Nijinsky (1889-1950) is told by Leonard Crofoot, a Broadway dancer who originated the role of Tom Thumb in "Barnum."
NEWS
July 16, 1996
Shouldn't mess with med schools in the cityIn his July 7 letter "We're paying to train too many physicians," Ernest B. Crofoot, chairman of the AFL-CIO Health Care Cost Containment Committee, revealed state taxpayers are giving millions of dollars a year to Johns Hopkins University and University of Maryland medical schools through state grants and added rates at these two teaching hospitals.He also said these medical schools are training too many specialists. Even more terrible, many of these students are from other states and countries who, when they graduate, leave Maryland to practice elsewhere.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Staff Writer | August 6, 1995
Timothy Francis Crofoot, who grudgingly left a career in musical theater to become one of the key figures in the State Highway Administration, died Thursday of an AIDS-related illness his home near Aberdeen. He was 32.In the late '80s, Mr. Crofoot, a self-taught piano player, was well known in the Baltimore and Washington area for orchestrating theater productions. Among other venues, he did arrangements at Toby's in Columbia, the White Marsh Dinner Theatre and Theater on the Hill at Western Maryland College.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Sun Staff Writer | January 22, 1995
The Harford County Council has approved spending $455,000 from the county's self-insurance fund to cover final bills for outside counsel in a long-standing suit against three companies that have insured Harford's landfills over 24 years.County Attorney Ernest Crofoot said payment of the latest legal bill, covering settlement costs, brings to $2,807,000 the county's total payment to Anderson, Kill, Olick and Oshinksy.The national firm, based in Washington and New York, specializes in insurance-recovery litigation.
NEWS
December 5, 1994
Jenevieve Crofoot-HessPimlico residentJenevieve Crofoot-Hess, a longtime resident of Pimlico and member of the Order of the Eastern Star for more than 65 years, died Friday of heart failure at the Maryland Masonic Home in Cockeysville. She was 92.She joined the order in 1925 and was part of a fund-raising effort in the late 1920s to build the Masonic home, also known as Bonnie Blink. Construction on the Tudor-style buildings began in 1931 and the first guests were received in 1934.Illness forced her to move to the retirement community's health care facility last year.
NEWS
July 16, 1996
Shouldn't mess with med schools in the cityIn his July 7 letter "We're paying to train too many physicians," Ernest B. Crofoot, chairman of the AFL-CIO Health Care Cost Containment Committee, revealed state taxpayers are giving millions of dollars a year to Johns Hopkins University and University of Maryland medical schools through state grants and added rates at these two teaching hospitals.He also said these medical schools are training too many specialists. Even more terrible, many of these students are from other states and countries who, when they graduate, leave Maryland to practice elsewhere.
NEWS
By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Sun Staff Writer | January 22, 1995
The Harford County Council has approved spending $455,000 from the county's self-insurance fund to cover final bills for outside counsel in a long-standing suit against three companies that have insured Harford's landfills over 24 years.County Attorney Ernest Crofoot said payment of the latest legal bill, covering settlement costs, brings to $2,807,000 the county's total payment to Anderson, Kill, Olick and Oshinksy.The national firm, based in Washington and New York, specializes in insurance-recovery litigation.
NEWS
By Kevin Harrison | April 24, 1994
Pete and Elise Crofoot of Glen BurnieVolunteer work: About 15 to 25 multiple sclerosis patients meet each Friday at the Fair Lanes Southdale in Pasadena, from autumn to mid-spring, to enjoy a few hours of bowling. Mr. and Mrs. Crofoot are among the volunteers who help the bowlers.Known as the Hopeful Wheelers, the group has been meeting for 26 years. Mrs. Crofoot has been volunteering with the group for more than 20 years. Her husband, Pete, has been with the group since he retired in 1988.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Staff Writer | October 3, 1993
Harford County will pay more than $300,000 of overtime in a settlement reached with 128 employees of the sheriff's office who were required to be at work 15 minutes early for roll call even though the sheriff had ordered the policy dropped in December 1990.The settlement includes active, retired and former nonunion deputies and other Detention Center personnel, including correctional officers and nurses employed between February 1989 and April 1992.The average payment to each person is about $2,000, said Ernest A. Crofoot, attorney for the county.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.