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By Judith E. Chernak Wanna But a Scorecard? | March 23, 1992
MarchMarch strides in, marching behind February,Chill rain blows gustily, weather seems wary:Should it stay cold still? Should it turn warm?Meanwhile, blue crocus pop up, true to form.My coat seems too heavy, wool suit not enought,I'd best take a raincoat, umbrella and stuff.March likes to fool you, 10 times every day,With sunshine and wind howl... March likes it that way.I know spring is coming on March twenty-first,We've just had an ice storm, the year's all-time worst.I squish though the slush, I squint at the glare,The bright light feels sparkly, it heats up my hair.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | August 13, 2009
There is something courageous about the tiny crocus. Its flowers, blooming determinedly through the snow, have the power to give the gardener the boost he needs to get through the last, lingering days of winter. "I love that they are so early," said Scott Kunst, owner of Old House Gardens heirloom bulbs of Ann Arbor, Mich. "And they are among the iconic flowers: tulips, lilies and lilacs. "Winter aconite is not the stuff of legends or poetry," he said. "Crocuses are. Every elementary school kid knows what a crocus is."
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FEATURES
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 11, 1998
Fall is the perfect season for the beginner gardener to get started. It's the traditional time to plant spring-blooming bulbs, which not only are very forgiving and easy to grow, but also provide welcome color during the early part of the year.Bulbs are also reassuringly reliable, as most come back every year. This makes them the natural backbone of most spring gardens.As an added plus, most bulbs are reasonably priced, except a few of the more exotic ones. Also, if you don't like the effect you produce the first spring, bulbs are easy to dig up and move about, or even pull out and discard if, say, the color combination turns out not to be what you had in mind.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMAS | March 5, 2006
How close is spring? By the calendar, two weeks. But for those of us desperate to reclaim the water and woods from winter's bite, there are other stirrings in the atmosphere that point to spring. One of the earliest indicators kicked in Wednesday with the opening of Liberty and Prettyboy reservoirs to boat fishermen. The plane that brought me home from the Olympics last week flew right over both reservoirs at about 10,000 feet. Even at that height, I swear I saw a bobbing boat or two, probably eager anglers checking out their favorite spots.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | April 2, 2005
ALL IT TAKES is a few brave crocus plants to poke their heads through the sodden soil and my urge to scratch the ground, to plant something, is overwhelming. This weekend, rainy though it may be, does promise an hour more daylight (daylight-saving time starts tomorrow) and that alone will make a lot of us gardeners anxious to get ourselves out of winter storage. Eventually, it will get warmer and those first nice days of spring can, I have learned, be a dangerous time to wander into your friendly garden-supply store.
NEWS
October 2, 2005
STEAL OF THE WEEK NEW WRINKLES IN SPRINKLERS Functional and cheap, the plastic IKEA PS Vallo watering can features high sides to avoid spillage, an enclosed handle and an open spout so you can actually see the flow of water. Dutch designer Monika Mulder made the nifty item, which comes in blue, red and light green, and holds 41 ounces of water. Available at IKEA stores. RETAIL PRICE: $1.99. SPLURGE OF THE WEEK WATCH GARDEN GROW IN STYLE These eye-catching Straight Teak Benches, designed by Barbara and Robert Tiffany, come in an array of shapes and sizes -- 50 inches wide to 132 inches wide.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff | October 1, 2003
In the plains of La Mancha, Spain, the quest for gold is about to begin. In the next few weeks, workers will go out into the fields to pluck the blossoms from the fall crocus. Inside each blossom is the treasure -- three thin yellow-orange threads that make the most expensive spice in the world -- saffron. Since ancient times, cooks have experienced the allure of the spice that turns dishes golden-yellow and imparts a pungent flavor no other spice can duplicate. Recipes may allow cooks to substitute turmeric or safflower, but those spices cannot imitate saffron's distinctive flavor.
NEWS
April 4, 1992
LACROSSE, horse racing, duckpins, sailing, jousting and other pastimes favored by Marylanders have quietly gone about their business, but under the surface there must be throbbing ire the noise volume over baseball.It doesn't promise to let up. Baseball & Baltimore have a train of events aligned, to follow 1992's acclaimed new proscenium: in 1993, the All-Star Game; in 1994, the centennial of our first pennant; in 1995, the centennial of Babe Ruth's birth -- followed, all going well, by Cal Ripken Jr.'s passing Lou Gehrig in the most-consecutive-games-played standings; and in 1996, 30 years after Baltimore's first World Series championship, maybe this generation's Orioles will win something.
NEWS
By Halle Gaut and By Halle Gaut,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 21, 2002
Your beat-up purse mirror that you bought years ago at the drugstore as a simple aid for applying lipstick in the car is about to have some fancy competition. Smythson's of Bond Street, an English company known primarily for its fine stationery and leather goods, is introducing its version of a compact mirror. It's actually two round mirrors of varying magnifications in colored pigskin leather. Besides being easy to hold, it folds into a stand -- freeing hands for easier viewing and make-up application.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | April 10, 2005
GOV. ROBERT L. Ehrlich Jr. has implored the General Assembly to refrain from "shenanigans." He might as well command the sun to rise in the west or to imagine Peter G. Angelos wearing a Washington Nationals cap. Shenanigans are the legislative crocus - or crab grass, depending on your viewpoint. When the annual 90-day session dwindles to days and hours, the shenanigan pops up in every bit of legislative turf. Makes you know the end is near, however you want to interpret that thought. At the end of every session, it is said, every bill is connected to every other bill.
NEWS
October 2, 2005
STEAL OF THE WEEK NEW WRINKLES IN SPRINKLERS Functional and cheap, the plastic IKEA PS Vallo watering can features high sides to avoid spillage, an enclosed handle and an open spout so you can actually see the flow of water. Dutch designer Monika Mulder made the nifty item, which comes in blue, red and light green, and holds 41 ounces of water. Available at IKEA stores. RETAIL PRICE: $1.99. SPLURGE OF THE WEEK WATCH GARDEN GROW IN STYLE These eye-catching Straight Teak Benches, designed by Barbara and Robert Tiffany, come in an array of shapes and sizes -- 50 inches wide to 132 inches wide.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | April 10, 2005
GOV. ROBERT L. Ehrlich Jr. has implored the General Assembly to refrain from "shenanigans." He might as well command the sun to rise in the west or to imagine Peter G. Angelos wearing a Washington Nationals cap. Shenanigans are the legislative crocus - or crab grass, depending on your viewpoint. When the annual 90-day session dwindles to days and hours, the shenanigan pops up in every bit of legislative turf. Makes you know the end is near, however you want to interpret that thought. At the end of every session, it is said, every bill is connected to every other bill.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | April 2, 2005
ALL IT TAKES is a few brave crocus plants to poke their heads through the sodden soil and my urge to scratch the ground, to plant something, is overwhelming. This weekend, rainy though it may be, does promise an hour more daylight (daylight-saving time starts tomorrow) and that alone will make a lot of us gardeners anxious to get ourselves out of winter storage. Eventually, it will get warmer and those first nice days of spring can, I have learned, be a dangerous time to wander into your friendly garden-supply store.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff | October 1, 2003
In the plains of La Mancha, Spain, the quest for gold is about to begin. In the next few weeks, workers will go out into the fields to pluck the blossoms from the fall crocus. Inside each blossom is the treasure -- three thin yellow-orange threads that make the most expensive spice in the world -- saffron. Since ancient times, cooks have experienced the allure of the spice that turns dishes golden-yellow and imparts a pungent flavor no other spice can duplicate. Recipes may allow cooks to substitute turmeric or safflower, but those spices cannot imitate saffron's distinctive flavor.
NEWS
By Halle Gaut and By Halle Gaut,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 21, 2002
Your beat-up purse mirror that you bought years ago at the drugstore as a simple aid for applying lipstick in the car is about to have some fancy competition. Smythson's of Bond Street, an English company known primarily for its fine stationery and leather goods, is introducing its version of a compact mirror. It's actually two round mirrors of varying magnifications in colored pigskin leather. Besides being easy to hold, it folds into a stand -- freeing hands for easier viewing and make-up application.
FEATURES
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 11, 1998
Fall is the perfect season for the beginner gardener to get started. It's the traditional time to plant spring-blooming bulbs, which not only are very forgiving and easy to grow, but also provide welcome color during the early part of the year.Bulbs are also reassuringly reliable, as most come back every year. This makes them the natural backbone of most spring gardens.As an added plus, most bulbs are reasonably priced, except a few of the more exotic ones. Also, if you don't like the effect you produce the first spring, bulbs are easy to dig up and move about, or even pull out and discard if, say, the color combination turns out not to be what you had in mind.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMAS | March 5, 2006
How close is spring? By the calendar, two weeks. But for those of us desperate to reclaim the water and woods from winter's bite, there are other stirrings in the atmosphere that point to spring. One of the earliest indicators kicked in Wednesday with the opening of Liberty and Prettyboy reservoirs to boat fishermen. The plane that brought me home from the Olympics last week flew right over both reservoirs at about 10,000 feet. Even at that height, I swear I saw a bobbing boat or two, probably eager anglers checking out their favorite spots.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | August 13, 2009
There is something courageous about the tiny crocus. Its flowers, blooming determinedly through the snow, have the power to give the gardener the boost he needs to get through the last, lingering days of winter. "I love that they are so early," said Scott Kunst, owner of Old House Gardens heirloom bulbs of Ann Arbor, Mich. "And they are among the iconic flowers: tulips, lilies and lilacs. "Winter aconite is not the stuff of legends or poetry," he said. "Crocuses are. Every elementary school kid knows what a crocus is."
FEATURES
By Ary Bruno and Ary Bruno,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 10, 1996
There is a wonderful way to add life and color to your home during the late winter months, even though the snow may be thick outside and spring weeks away. This easy process is called forcing flowers for indoor bloom.Most spring blooming bulbs adapt well to forcing, but some are )) more reliable and less fussy than others. The best of the smaller bulbs are Dutch crocus and snow crocus, Siberian squill, wood hyacinths, anemone blandas and grape hyacinths. These can all be transplanted out into the flower bed in spring while their leaves are still green.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | April 4, 1995
Washington. -- I try to be cheerful these mornings when I look out at the spring burst of daffodils, violets and tulips; the gorgeous blossoming of cherry, Bradford pear and willow trees; at the forsythia and crocuses and all the things that make this one of the most beautiful cities in the world.But it is hard to rejoice when you are becoming one of the most highly taxed persons in America, with no meaningful political representation. It is painful to see that ''home rule'' is vanishing, the feeble dream of statehood is dead, and the nation's capital will soon be ruled by a monstrosity called the District of Columbia Financial Responsibility and Management Assistance Authority.
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