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By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | October 14, 1991
Under the window in Milhardy's kitchen stands a comfortable rocking chair, her favorite spot to crochet, snooze a little or just look outat the spreading maple tree in her yard.Here the light is good enough for her to stitch the most intricate patterns, the most elaborate afghans, the most delicate doilies.Her eyes aren't that strong any more, but her hand is still steady. At 75, Milhardy is making more afghans, vests and baby blankets than ever. She whiles away many afternoons rocking back and forth in her chair and crocheting a new pattern.
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December 15, 2011
From left, Charles and Betty Roberts, of Mount Airy, donated 50 homemade lap blankets and blankets by the Community Knitting and Crocheting Group, of Columbia, to the local Be a Santa to a Senior program, which provides gifts and companionship to seniors who otherwise might not receive either this holiday season. Receiving the donation on behalf of Home Instead Senior Care is Pamela Urnowey, right. Home Instead Senior Care of Arnold and Ellicott City organized the local Be a Santa to a Senior program along with project partners Anne Arundel County Department on Aging, Howard County Department on Aging, Meals on Wheels, Partner's in Care, Girl Scout Troop 5339, Walmart, Kmart, Berman Goldman & Ribakow LLP, Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson LLP, Morningside House of Friendship and Sunrise Senior Living in Severna Park.
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NEWS
By Consella A. Lee and Consella A. Lee,Sun Staff Writer | April 18, 1994
They are known as the "Yarn Ladies," and they have crocheted hundreds of lap covers for Anne Arundel County's nursing home residents.Last year, the five women, all members of the Retired Teachers Association of Anne Arundel, made 177 lap covers."
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,joseph.burris@baltsun.com | May 6, 2009
Vivian Haughee draped the bright green prayer shawl over her shoulders and wrapped it around her body. Then she clutched her arms together over the shawl in a warm embrace. Whatever healing powers the knitted garment possessed, they weren't about to escape. "My heart is so full, I feel like crying, not tears of sorrow but tears of joy," said Haughee, 64, after receiving the prayer shawl in her room at Carroll Hospital Center, where she was being treated for fibromyalgia. She was among the first recipients of the hospital's prayer shawl ministry, which was launched by its spiritual care and volunteer services departments in February to offer holistic care.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Staff Writer | January 27, 1993
It's not every child, especially at the age of 12, who finds herself teacher to people six decades her senior and relishing every single minute of it.But Lara Haase has the enviable position of teaching her favorite pastime -- crochet -- to a small group whose company she has found she just plain enjoys.Three afternoons a week you'll find the Harper's Choice Middle School student at the Lorien Nursing Home and Rehabilitation Center leading a small group of the residents in a crochet project.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Staff Writer | January 28, 1993
The sophisticated baby boomer may be surprised to see the new turn crochet has taken, especially if she remembers trucking along in a long, droopy vest of her own manufacture in the '60s.Crochet is yet another element of flower-child style that has been dusted off for 1993. Designers have taken it up from the young and hip, who have been wearing the tatty stuff as an anti-fashion statement for some years.As the youth of the '60s and '70s grew out of hip-huggers and into career clothes, hippie togs were banished to thrift shop bins, where they moldered.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Staff Writer | November 6, 1992
New York -- Designers are hooked on crochet and macrame for spring -- yet another flashback to hippie style that's flashing a lot of skin on runways here.At Louis Dell'Olio's spare and elegant collection for Anne Klein, one dress had photographers barking and the reporters buzzing -- a black, crochet skintight sheath. Auntie Maud would have blushed had she known her favorite doily crochet patterns could be arranged into anything this sexy.Nicole Miller tossed some beads into a black number that appeared to be nothing more than a macrame necklace that grew into a dress.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff | April 19, 1998
A head for fashionHair styles that are undone is what's being done this spring. You can see this hot new 'do on models in magazines and on the Paris runways. (And beautiful people like Cameron Diaz and Winona Ryder have been spotted sporting it.)The look is choppy, sometimes uneven, and it's worn fairly short. The hair may be artfully tousled or cropped short with spiky wisps that zigzag around face and neck. It's glamour with the tiniest bit of subversion.The key? It may be messy, but it's not a mess.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Sun Staff | June 1, 2003
Can't figure out what to get Dad for Father's Day? Fuggetaboutit. If he's a fan of HBO's mob drama The Sopranos, we have the gift for you. We're talking Italian silk ties here, a new line of bright brilliant neckwear in geometric patterns that pretty much sum up the world of Tony Soprano, minus the whacking. The ties, by Zanzara International, come in both a Sopranos line, with a "classy, updated traditional look," and a "Bada Bing!" line, with "bolder patterns and colors," according to a press release.
NEWS
By William Amelia | October 25, 1994
On a scarred city parking lota common striped grease patch.I flushed one of nature's jewels,an American Woodcock, Scolopax minor,an eccentric game gird of the woods' edge,who prefers the cover of brush,and the darkness under ferns,but whose ancient rhythmscompel him to emerge on spring evenings,at exactly twenty two minutes after sunset,to perform a mating skydance, a saraband,once seen you remember for life.Yet in one of nature's surprisesthere he was, just beneathmy car, silent, waitingand for a second meeting my eyebefore erupting, whistling wingsand a few liquid notes, in aquick crochet across the sky,a target of feather and flesh for some,but safe tonight -- free, buoyantand rising, steadily rising,'til he cleared the buildingand disappeared into the evening sky.
NEWS
By Emily Groves and Emily Groves,Sun reporter | February 29, 2008
Betty Roberts spent most of her career as a government employee, working "to change the world." Though she has retired from her position at Fort Meade, her work hasn't stopped. Two times a month, Roberts, 68, of Mount Airy surrounds herself with yarn, needles and a close-knit group of friends, knitting and crocheting for charity. The Howard County Community Knitting and Crocheting Group, which has met for more than 14 years, knits and crochets baby clothes, hats, scarves and blankets with donated yarn.
NEWS
November 17, 2007
Beatrice L. Foot, a former cook who was known for her crocheting skills, died Thursday of complications from Alzheimer's disease at Future Care Charles Village. She was 92. Born Beatrice L. Allen and raised in West Baltimore, she attended night school at Douglass High School, where she earned her diploma. Mrs. Foot worked for more than 50 years as a cook for several Roland Park families. She retired about 30 years ago, family members said. "She loved to cook and entertain at home. Everything she made was good and beautifully served," said a niece, Maria Tolson of Baltimore.
NEWS
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,SUN REPORTER | March 19, 2006
If you missed having a white Christmas last year, take heart -- a white spring is on its way. Fashion-wise, at least. Where last spring was all about rich colors and luxury, this spring is simpler, crisper, cleaner. And white is a major theme -- from your A-line trench coat to your ruffled shirt -- as are cousins of the color, such as beige, ecru, bone and nude. This spring is a white buttoned-up shirt instead of a jungle-patterned shrug. It's khaki-colored Bermuda shorts instead of tiered Bohemian skirts.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,Sun Staff | June 1, 2003
Can't figure out what to get Dad for Father's Day? Fuggetaboutit. If he's a fan of HBO's mob drama The Sopranos, we have the gift for you. We're talking Italian silk ties here, a new line of bright brilliant neckwear in geometric patterns that pretty much sum up the world of Tony Soprano, minus the whacking. The ties, by Zanzara International, come in both a Sopranos line, with a "classy, updated traditional look," and a "Bada Bing!" line, with "bolder patterns and colors," according to a press release.
NEWS
December 25, 2002
Olive M. Alexander, a homemaker and hospital volunteer, died of heart failure Sunday at White Oak Manor Nursing Home in Kings Mountain, N.C. The former Hampden resident was 100. Mrs. Alexander worked briefly in the cafeteria at the Johns Hopkins University, and had been a longtime volunteer at Union Memorial Hospital. Much of her time was devoted to crocheting, said her son, Alex Alexander of Kings Mountain. "She loved to crochet [blankets] and she would turn around and give them to the residents of hospitals and nursing homes for comfort," her son said.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Sun Staff | April 19, 1998
A head for fashionHair styles that are undone is what's being done this spring. You can see this hot new 'do on models in magazines and on the Paris runways. (And beautiful people like Cameron Diaz and Winona Ryder have been spotted sporting it.)The look is choppy, sometimes uneven, and it's worn fairly short. The hair may be artfully tousled or cropped short with spiky wisps that zigzag around face and neck. It's glamour with the tiniest bit of subversion.The key? It may be messy, but it's not a mess.
NEWS
December 25, 2002
Olive M. Alexander, a homemaker and hospital volunteer, died of heart failure Sunday at White Oak Manor Nursing Home in Kings Mountain, N.C. The former Hampden resident was 100. Mrs. Alexander worked briefly in the cafeteria at the Johns Hopkins University, and had been a longtime volunteer at Union Memorial Hospital. Much of her time was devoted to crocheting, said her son, Alex Alexander of Kings Mountain. "She loved to crochet [blankets] and she would turn around and give them to the residents of hospitals and nursing homes for comfort," her son said.
NEWS
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,SUN REPORTER | March 19, 2006
If you missed having a white Christmas last year, take heart -- a white spring is on its way. Fashion-wise, at least. Where last spring was all about rich colors and luxury, this spring is simpler, crisper, cleaner. And white is a major theme -- from your A-line trench coat to your ruffled shirt -- as are cousins of the color, such as beige, ecru, bone and nude. This spring is a white buttoned-up shirt instead of a jungle-patterned shrug. It's khaki-colored Bermuda shorts instead of tiered Bohemian skirts.
NEWS
October 1, 1997
Helen M. Brodka, who was stricken with polio when she was 2 years old but raised a family and worked at several jobs at home, died of cancer Sept. 21 at Mariner Health of Glen Burnie. She was 80.Mrs. Brodka was a former resident of Pinewood, a home for handicapped senior citizens near Glen Burnie, where she lived for 22 years. She raised three children, earning a living crocheting scarves, selling light bulbs by telephone and monitoring television commercials.The former Helen Smith was born in the Hampton section of Baltimore County.
FEATURES
By VIDA ROBERTS and VIDA ROBERTS,SUN FASHION EDITOR | July 14, 1996
Primitive and practicalIt's summer's take-anywhere bag and works equally well for the granola crowd and city slickers. The simple straw crochet design can be produced in any country that has skilled hands, so the shape is showing up everywhere in designer versions, one-price shops and street stalls. Shown here, the look by Kaminski, at That Handbag Place in Pikesville.From fun shades from the discount store to designer-logo styles that cost in the hundreds, sunglasses are a hot-weather must.
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