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NEWS
July 4, 1993
SARAJEVO suffered its heaviest shelling in weeks and fighting spreads in central Bosnia, where government troops are trying to hold an ever-decreasing amount of territory. Serb and Croat gunners hit the Muslim enclave of MAGLAJ, 50 miles north of the capital, while Croats and Muslims traded fire around TRAVNIK Fighting between government and Croat forces reportedly erupted on two other central Bosnian fronts farther south, at FOJNICA and PROZOR.In the Muslim enclave of SREBRENICA, the first "safe area" to be declared by the United Nations this spring, U.N. officials said they were considering evacuating the town because protecting its inhabitants and getting them food, water and shelter was proving impossible.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 20, 1996
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- While nationwide elections last month did not promise a new heaven and a new earth, they did promise a new Bosnia where ethnic Croats, Serbs and Muslims, who spent four years at war, would have a chance to work together to build a common government.But a month after the elections, which were a pillar of the Dayton peace agreement, the landscape of the new Bosnia is depressingly familiar. The new presidency and Parliament, intended by international mediators to unify Bosnia, are being boycotted by the Bosnian Serbs.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 4, 1993
UNITED NATIONS -- President Alija Izetbegovic, the Muslim leader of the Bosnian government, will address the General Assembly this week, and advisers are pressing him to use the opportunity to propose a territorial compromise with the Serbs.The official aim of Mr. Izetbegovic's trip is to explain why the Muslim-led Bosnian Parliament last week rejected the latest version of a peace plan that would split the country into three ethnic states.Muhamed Sacirbey, Bosnia's representative to the United Nations, said yesterday that he also expected Mr. Izetbegovic to "launch some new ideas when he explains our position to the General Assembly on Wednesday."
NEWS
January 16, 1996
PRESIDENT CLINTON's whirlwind trip to Bosnia was a well-timed show of his authority as commander-in-chief. Many Americans may harbor doubts about his commitment of 20,000 U.S. troops to that war-scarred Balkan nation, but there should ,, be no doubt about his constitutional power to do so. Even a hostile Republican-controlled Congress has been relatively acquiescent.For Mr. Clinton, the friendly welcome he received from G.I.s in Tuzla, headquarters of the American sector, came as an election-year bonanza.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 13, 1995
BANJA LUKA, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Croats and Muslims in this Serbian-held city in northern Bosnia are being forcibly evicted from their homes in acts of revenge by some of more than 100,000 Serbian refugees who fled their territory in Croatia last weekend in a rout by Croatian forces, relief officials said yesterday.A Roman Catholic bishop said in an interview here that gangs of armed Serbian refugees had hunted down Croats in Muslim neighborhoods in the city, threatening to kill the occupants if they did not leave immediately.
NEWS
By RANDAL ASHLEY | February 14, 1993
"We don't do mountains" is apparently as much a policy of Bill Clinton as it was of George Bush when it comes to military intervention amid the rugged land and bitter people of Bosnia-Herzegovina.President Clinton will "bring the full weight of American diplomacy to bear" on stopping the slaughter in Bosnia, but the outcome depends on the Serbs, Croats and Bosnian Muslims reaching their own agreement to end the three-way war.Assuming that U.S. diplomats can work magic on Balkan minds and achieve a cease-fire, then -- and only then -- would the United States commit U.S. forces to "implement and enforce" the peace plan -- as a small part of an international force.
NEWS
January 16, 1996
PRESIDENT CLINTON's whirlwind trip to Bosnia was a well-timed show of his authority as commander-in-chief. Many Americans may harbor doubts about his commitment of 20,000 U.S. troops to that war-scarred Balkan nation, but there should ,, be no doubt about his constitutional power to do so. Even a hostile Republican-controlled Congress has been relatively acquiescent.For Mr. Clinton, the friendly welcome he received from G.I.s in Tuzla, headquarters of the American sector, came as an election-year bonanza.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer | July 26, 1992
BELGRADE, Serbia -- In the turmoil of Yugoslavia's civil war, the term "ethnic cleansing" has become the most popular euphemism for terrorism and atrocities.Advanced for the first time a year ago by the notoriously nationalistic Serb politician Vojislav Seselj, it has come to mean the forcible removal of hundreds of thousands of people from their homes in an effort to establish "ethnically pure" areas.As the people are forced out, symbols of the enemy nationality are systematically erased.
NEWS
November 16, 1995
AFTER A FORTNIGHT of U.S.-sponsored-negotiations in Dayton, Ohio, the Clinton administration appears confident enough of a Bosnia settlement to begin an intense drive to turn congressional sentiment about sending 20,000 U.S. troops there from distinctly negative to borderline positive.Grounds for cautious optimism can be found in agreements among the Serbs, Croats and Muslims on some especially contentious issues. Foremost is the Serb-Croat accord under which the Serb-led Yugoslav regime in Belgrade will evacuate the eastern Slavonian territory it occupied when it opened war on Croatia four years ago. Combined with the Serb relinquishment of Krajina with hardly a fight last August, this represents a major turnaround by Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic from war-monger to peace-monger.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 20, 1996
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- While nationwide elections last month did not promise a new heaven and a new earth, they did promise a new Bosnia where ethnic Croats, Serbs and Muslims, who spent four years at war, would have a chance to work together to build a common government.But a month after the elections, which were a pillar of the Dayton peace agreement, the landscape of the new Bosnia is depressingly familiar. The new presidency and Parliament, intended by international mediators to unify Bosnia, are being boycotted by the Bosnian Serbs.
NEWS
November 16, 1995
AFTER A FORTNIGHT of U.S.-sponsored-negotiations in Dayton, Ohio, the Clinton administration appears confident enough of a Bosnia settlement to begin an intense drive to turn congressional sentiment about sending 20,000 U.S. troops there from distinctly negative to borderline positive.Grounds for cautious optimism can be found in agreements among the Serbs, Croats and Muslims on some especially contentious issues. Foremost is the Serb-Croat accord under which the Serb-led Yugoslav regime in Belgrade will evacuate the eastern Slavonian territory it occupied when it opened war on Croatia four years ago. Combined with the Serb relinquishment of Krajina with hardly a fight last August, this represents a major turnaround by Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic from war-monger to peace-monger.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 23, 1995
KLJUC, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- By bus, by truck and by horse-drawn cart, the land rush of western Bosnia has begun, an edgy competition endangering not only the peace process but also the lives of some of the country's most vulnerable people.Leading the territorial charge are the Croatian and Muslim armies that recently drove Serbian soldiers and civilians out of the region, except that now the ostensible allies are vying to repopulate their new holdings with as many of their own people as possible.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 13, 1995
BANJA LUKA, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Croats and Muslims in this Serbian-held city in northern Bosnia are being forcibly evicted from their homes in acts of revenge by some of more than 100,000 Serbian refugees who fled their territory in Croatia last weekend in a rout by Croatian forces, relief officials said yesterday.A Roman Catholic bishop said in an interview here that gangs of armed Serbian refugees had hunted down Croats in Muslim neighborhoods in the city, threatening to kill the occupants if they did not leave immediately.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 4, 1993
UNITED NATIONS -- President Alija Izetbegovic, the Muslim leader of the Bosnian government, will address the General Assembly this week, and advisers are pressing him to use the opportunity to propose a territorial compromise with the Serbs.The official aim of Mr. Izetbegovic's trip is to explain why the Muslim-led Bosnian Parliament last week rejected the latest version of a peace plan that would split the country into three ethnic states.Muhamed Sacirbey, Bosnia's representative to the United Nations, said yesterday that he also expected Mr. Izetbegovic to "launch some new ideas when he explains our position to the General Assembly on Wednesday."
NEWS
July 11, 1993
International mediators failed to persuade Bosnia's leaders to negotiate on a plan calling for ethnic division of their war-torn homeland. The meeting in ZAGREB, Croatia came a day after Bosnia's 10-member presidency rejected the proposal, which is backed by the leaders of Serbia and Croatia.Some scattered Croat-Muslim fighting was reported from central Bosnia, and in the embattled southwestern city of MOSTAR, Croat forces were shelling the left bank of the Neretva river and Bosnian army positions, U.N. spokesman Cmdr.
NEWS
By RANDAL ASHLEY | February 14, 1993
"We don't do mountains" is apparently as much a policy of Bill Clinton as it was of George Bush when it comes to military intervention amid the rugged land and bitter people of Bosnia-Herzegovina.President Clinton will "bring the full weight of American diplomacy to bear" on stopping the slaughter in Bosnia, but the outcome depends on the Serbs, Croats and Bosnian Muslims reaching their own agreement to end the three-way war.Assuming that U.S. diplomats can work magic on Balkan minds and achieve a cease-fire, then -- and only then -- would the United States commit U.S. forces to "implement and enforce" the peace plan -- as a small part of an international force.
NEWS
November 25, 1992
Bosnian Slaughter and HolocaustTerrible as is the internecine slaughter and "ethnic cleansing" in Bosnia, it must not be equated with the uniquely horrendous Holocaust of Jewish innocents. They were passive, peaceful humans, guilty only of having been born.German Jews had never committed genocide against German non-Jews, as Croats and Muslims had done against Serbs in World War II.Led by the heroic "Draza" Mihajlovic, courageous Serb partisans fought against the Nazis, while Croats collaborated.
NEWS
November 25, 1992
Bosnian Slaughter and HolocaustTerrible as is the internecine slaughter and "ethnic cleansing" in Bosnia, it must not be equated with the uniquely horrendous Holocaust of Jewish innocents. They were passive, peaceful humans, guilty only of having been born.German Jews had never committed genocide against German non-Jews, as Croats and Muslims had done against Serbs in World War II.Led by the heroic "Draza" Mihajlovic, courageous Serb partisans fought against the Nazis, while Croats collaborated.
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