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By Georgie Anne Geyer | August 9, 1995
Washington -- THREE YEARS AGO, just as the war in Bosnia was really heating up, the Croatian defense minister in Zagreb spoke some haunting and prophetic words to me."If you take away a people's right to defend themselves," he said, "then you are morally responsible to defend them."Those words kept ringing in my ears this extraordinary week, as his newly invigorated Croatian army of more than 100,000 men swept over the Serb-occupied Krajina sector of Croatia. In less than three days of fighting, the Croats had destroyed 1)
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SPORTS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 24, 2003
WIMBLEDON, England - Tradition is everything at Wimbledon, and so, yesterday, defending champion and top seed Lleyton Hewitt was supposed to take to the grass against a no-name opponent - in this case, the player ranked No. 203 in men's tennis - and cruise to the next round. It would be a Centre Court victory lap of sorts for the title he won last year. But nobody, apparently, told that to Ivo Karlovic. The 6-foot-10 Croat used a monstrous wingspan, a slingshot serve and a craftsman's deft touch to defeat Hewitt in one of the biggest upsets in tournament history.
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NEWS
By JAMES BOCK and JAMES BOCK,Staff Writer | February 21, 1993
Momcilo Cvijanovic and Joe Kerekovic should have much in common.Both are middle-aged immigrants from the former Yugoslavia. Both speak Serbo-Croatian. Both are engineers.But Mr. Cvijanovic was born a Serb and Mr. Kerekovic a Croat, and in the past two years of civil war in their former homeland, that has made the two men very different.Yesterday, the two engineers were in Baltimore for a Slavic-American forum convened by the Rev. Ivan Dornic on how to help end the conflict in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Croatia.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 10, 2000
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Four years after Bosnia's war, weekend elections showed how deep the ethnic divide in this country remains, as Muslim voters shifted toward moderate leaders while Serbs and Croats stayed with old-style nationalists. Although official preliminary results in the vote for municipal councils were not expected until today, the contending parties' estimates of their showings yesterday were being regarded as reliable. In the past, such assertions have generally proved accurate.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | June 11, 1993
MANY of the reports from this lovely but increasingly war-weary Hapsburgian capital make it appear that the Croats have now embarked upon their own war against the Serbs -- and against their former Bosnian Muslim allies as well.That is not what is happening here, and one wonders how skewed the admittedly elusive "truths" about this conflict can become.This newest Croatian "war" began Jan. 22, when soldiers of the now 200,000-man Croatian armed forces launched "Operation Maslenica" in the Dalmatian coast region behind the Adriatic port of Zadar, which after two years of war is still under rocket attacks by nearby Serbs.
NEWS
October 23, 1992
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- Croat and Muslim militiamen 0) battled for a fourth straight day in central Bosnia today, further straining their shaky alliance against ethnic Serbs. Indian Gen. Satish Nambiar, commander of U.N. peacekeeping troops in former Yugoslav republics, said in Zagreb, Croatia, that leaders of the two factions were trying to keep the feud from spreading.Tensions between Croats and Muslims have broken into scattered battles this week and added an ominous new ingredient to the war begun nearly eight months ago by Serbs who opposed Bosnia's secession from Yugoslavia.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 3, 1994
The KGB promised Ames a dacha in Russia. That's where he should be locked up.Bosnian Croats and Bosnian Bosnians made peace because the Croats are getting ready for their real war, against the Serbs again.Soft-hearted BG&E won't shut off your power until April. They think this winter will be over by April?Bring on them Calgary Stampeders!
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 8, 1995
The U.N. is nothing if not even-handed. It will do nothing to stop Croat atrocities, either.Genocide practiced by Ushtashe thugs of Croatia to kill or convert Serbs in the 1940s is the reference for Serb fears of independent Croatia, Serb atrocities against Croats in 1991 and Muslims in 1992, and whatever Croats will do and Serbs do back in 1995.Don't give up on summer and global warming. The next heat wave may beat the last one.
NEWS
September 16, 1993
A new cease-fire accord failed to curb fighting in central an southwestern Bosnia. Muslims remain under heavy fire by Croats in MOSTAR. Bosnian Croats accuse Muslim-led government )R troops of murdering 34 civilians in UZDOL.SARAJEVO was relative calm during a visit by Russian Foreign Minister Andrei Kozyrev, who is trying to get three-way Geneva peace negotiations started again.Violence eased between the Croatian army and Serb rebels, who signed a U.N.-brokered truce after nearly a week of fighting that was the worst Croatia has seen in eight months.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 3, 2000
ZAGREB, Croatia -- The election season in Croatia has been shortened by fate and the nationalist incumbents, who stopped campaigning once to mourn the late President Franjo Tudjman and again for celebrations of Christmas and New Year's. But even the abridged stumping has convinced Croats and foreign observers that after five successive dictatorships this century, the parliamentary balloting today and a presidential vote three weeks later are the best chance for a democratic Croatia and peace in the region.
TOPIC
By Sam Greene | March 28, 1999
PAKRAC, Croatia -- The locals know her as Crazy Ljuba.For 2 1/2 years, Ljuba Selthufer sat tight in her small, fourth-floor apartment, 50 meters from one of the most fiercely contested front lines in the former Yugoslavia. By day, she would lean out her windows and yell -- to Serbs on one side and Croats on the other -- to end the civil war or shoot her and get it over with. By night, stray bullets flew through her bedroom window, piercing her wall and her sleep."Where was I supposed to be?"
NEWS
By Richard Boudreaux and Richard Boudreaux,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 29, 1997
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- On one side of Bosnia's postwar divide, teen-age survivors of the siege of Sarajevo skate through what was once a military bunker and is now a booming underground mall. Shoppers browse air-conditioned boutiques and sporting goods stores, selecting beachwear for their first vacations in years. Some venture into the bigger showrooms, looking to replace cars and appliances destroyed by almost four years of ethnic slaughter.On the other side, in the drab little ski resort of Pale just 10 miles away, the closest thing to a mall are rows of flimsy metal tables under sidewalk umbrellas.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 10, 1997
SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina -- The United States will supply Bosnia's Muslim-Croat Federation with more than 100 heavy-artillery cannons, officials said yesterday, sharply escalating that army's potential firepower.The weapons are part of a $100-million train-and-equip program for the Muslim-Croat army, sponsored by Washington and heavily criticized by European allies.James Pardew, the U.S. diplomat in charge of the program, said at a Sarajevo news conference that 116 155-millimeter howitzers will be sent to federation forces, which until now had six. An additional 51 slightly smaller howitzers will be manufactured locally with U.S. help.
NEWS
November 28, 1996
UNREST IN BELGRADE, capital of Serbia, and Zagreb, capital of Croatia, undermines the strong men who brought wars to Yugoslavia. And since they agreed to the peace, it undermines that.Franjo Tudjman, president of Croatia, is 74 and was rushed to Walter Reed Hospital with what authorities in Washington called stomach cancer and in Zagreb called digestive problems. Then he went home to witness strikes for wages and against government suppression of the last independent radio station.Mr. Tudjman had quit as a general in Communist dictator Tito's Yugoslav army decades ago to pursue Croat nationalism and write revisionist history.
NEWS
September 11, 1996
DISMAL EXPECTATIONS are just about the only thing going for the U.S.-brokered elections in Bosnia on Saturday. Even if NATO forces succeed in avoiding violence as citizens displaced by war attempt to vote in hometown precincts, the result is more likely to deepen the ethnic partition of the battered state than to bring it closer to unity. U.S. officials probably would be content if renewed warfare is avoided and the governmental structure called for in the Dayton Accords does not collapse overnight.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 18, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Setting the stage for a Bosnian war-crimes trial in an American court, the Supreme Court refused yesterday to block damage lawsuits against the Bosnian Serb leader, Radovan Karadzic.Without comment, the court left intact a federal appeals court ruling that clears the way for thousands of Bosnian Muslims and Croats to pursue their claims in a U.S. district court in New York City."It is safe to say that we are seeking hundreds of millions of dollars" from Karadzic, said Beth Stephens, a Rutgers University law professor who is handling one of the two cases.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 30, 1996
VUKOVAR, Croatia -- Up here, just north of Bosnia, without a single NATO soldier in sight, peace seems to be taking hold.Ask almost any Serb or Croat in this disputed area known as Eastern Slavonia, and for a change they agree: The United Nations is quietly but steadily doing a good job along this old battlefield, earning mutual confidence in a place wrecked by artillery in 1991, half a year before war spread to Bosnia.Led by Jacques Paul Klein, a gregarious U.S. diplomat and general in the Air Force Reserve, this little-publicized effort already has an impressive list of accomplishments.
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