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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | October 31, 2007
By poking a touch-screen computer, crews aboard Maryland State Police helicopters can now calculate more efficient flight plans to add inspections of dams, bridges and other "critical infrastructure" to their daily missions. The choppers were equipped last month with hand-held tablet computers linked to navigation satellites, digital maps and databases with the locations of hospitals, chemical factories and other sensitive facilities. That allows airborne troopers to quickly find and patrol such sites looking for damage or terrorist threats.
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NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
WASHINGTON -- He won't face a challenge in next week's primary election, but Rep. John Delaney nevertheless began running television advertisements on Wednesday. The Potomac Democrat is buying airtime to highlight what has been his signature legislative effort since arriving in Congress last year, a proposal to allow companies to repatriate a portion of their overseas cash, tax free, if they make investments in the nation's infrastructure. The spot is running on broadcast television in Hagerstown, Md., and on cable in the Washington media market.
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NEWS
By Paul McMasters | July 25, 2002
At a time when the public and elected officials alike are clamoring for more disclosure and accountability in the corporate world, a little-noted provision in legislation establishing a Department of Homeland Security could make corporate dealings even more obscure and less accountable. Despite criticism from members of Congress and public-interest and press groups, the administration is insisting on "information-sharing" language for the legislation that would allow the new department to exempt businesses from the legal requirements of the Freedom of Information Act when voluntarily submitting "critical infrastructure information" to the department.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2013
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc., which owns or is in the process of acquiring 140 television stations throughout the U.S., is purchasing a manufacturer of transmission antennas, the Hunt Valley broadcast firm announced Tuesday. Dielectric, a Maine-based subsidiary of a North Carolina company, planned to stop operating at the end of the month. Parent company SPX Corp. decided in April to close the antenna maker because of low profitability, according to news reports. "Dielectric has supplied more than two-thirds of the TV industry's high power antennas and its name is synonymous with expert engineering and quality products," said David Smith, Sinclair's president and CEO, in a statement.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2013
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc., which owns or is in the process of acquiring 140 television stations throughout the U.S., is purchasing a manufacturer of transmission antennas, the Hunt Valley broadcast firm announced Tuesday. Dielectric, a Maine-based subsidiary of a North Carolina company, planned to stop operating at the end of the month. Parent company SPX Corp. decided in April to close the antenna maker because of low profitability, according to news reports. "Dielectric has supplied more than two-thirds of the TV industry's high power antennas and its name is synonymous with expert engineering and quality products," said David Smith, Sinclair's president and CEO, in a statement.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
A new computing facility at the National Security Agency will help the country better defend against cyber attacks , agency officials and members of Congress said Monday. The High Performance Computing Center-2 will assist in "front-line defense against immediate threats" in cyberspace, Gen. Keith B. Alexander, the director of the National Security Agency and head of U.S. Cyber Command, said during a groundbreaking ceremony Monday at Fort Meade. The 600,000-square-foot facility, similar in function to an existing computer center, is scheduled to open in 2016.
NEWS
By Chet Dembeck | January 9, 2007
I wonder how many of those who voted for Gov.-elect Martin O'Malley realized they were also voting for an open-ended, statewide expansion of citizen surveillance that includes "watch centers" and "watch lists"? You may think this sounds Orwellian, but it's no joke. Mr. O'Malley never hid his strong intention to expand the use of technology and police resources to fight crime and terrorism; he simply failed to outline any safeguards that would ensure such increased surveillance wouldn't be abused to spy on law-abiding citizens for political or any other reasons.
NEWS
By James M. Lindsay | July 22, 2002
WASHINGTON - House Republican leaders have drafted legislation creating a Department of Homeland Security, making a few changes to President Bush's proposal but failing to deal with its main flaw: It tries to do too much. Mr. Bush was right to propose creating a new department. The homeland security task has long been treated as an afterthought, with more than 100 federal agencies claiming a role. Good organization cannot guarantee security, but bad organization invites disaster. Yet when it comes to reorganizing the federal government, caution is warranted.
NEWS
By Michael Hayden, Samuel Visner and William Courtney | February 15, 2010
Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has commendably warned states, terrorists and their proxies that America will protect its computer networks. To do so, however, the federal government must do much more to reach out to the private sector, which controls the vast majority of U.S. critical infrastructure, from banks to communications to energy. Cyber security affects every American. It enables the operation of nearly every part of the economy, from banking to manufacturing to retail to health care.
NEWS
By K. Riva Levinson | October 29, 2006
Regardless of past mistakes, the new Iraq still can be saved. In my opinion as an adviser to the Iraq Study Group, any rescue plan should focus on basic measures, including U.S. troop redeployment, prevention of oil theft and corruption, training of Iraqi troops, recognition of the influence of Iran and Syria, and promotion of democracy. Redeploy troops. Coalition forces should redeploy around critical infrastructure. They should have a defined space to defend instead of being sitting ducks for insurgents on the streets.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
A new computing facility at the National Security Agency will help the country better defend against cyber attacks , agency officials and members of Congress said Monday. The High Performance Computing Center-2 will assist in "front-line defense against immediate threats" in cyberspace, Gen. Keith B. Alexander, the director of the National Security Agency and head of U.S. Cyber Command, said during a groundbreaking ceremony Monday at Fort Meade. The 600,000-square-foot facility, similar in function to an existing computer center, is scheduled to open in 2016.
NEWS
By Henry F. Cooper | September 6, 2012
Recent reports suggest that the U.S. government was likely engaged in two very sophisticated cyber attacks: one that spied on Iran's nuclear program and another that slowed it by destroying centrifuges. These attacks encourage a twinge of national pride in our cyber capabilities. Yet there's a dark corollary to this news. Our enemies can use similarly sophisticated cyber tactics to attack the U.S. government and our private sector. Billions in intellectual property and state secrets are at risk, as well as the critical infrastructure that supports modern American life.
NEWS
By Michael Hayden, Samuel Visner and William Courtney | February 15, 2010
S ecretary of State Hillary Clinton has commendably warned states, terrorists and their proxies that America will protect its computer networks. To do so, however, the federal government must do much more to reach out to the private sector, which controls the vast majority of U.S. critical infrastructure, from banks to communications to energy. Cyber security affects every American. It enables the operation of nearly every part of the economy, from banking to manufacturing to retail to health care.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | October 31, 2007
By poking a touch-screen computer, crews aboard Maryland State Police helicopters can now calculate more efficient flight plans to add inspections of dams, bridges and other "critical infrastructure" to their daily missions. The choppers were equipped last month with hand-held tablet computers linked to navigation satellites, digital maps and databases with the locations of hospitals, chemical factories and other sensitive facilities. That allows airborne troopers to quickly find and patrol such sites looking for damage or terrorist threats.
NEWS
By Chet Dembeck | January 9, 2007
I wonder how many of those who voted for Gov.-elect Martin O'Malley realized they were also voting for an open-ended, statewide expansion of citizen surveillance that includes "watch centers" and "watch lists"? You may think this sounds Orwellian, but it's no joke. Mr. O'Malley never hid his strong intention to expand the use of technology and police resources to fight crime and terrorism; he simply failed to outline any safeguards that would ensure such increased surveillance wouldn't be abused to spy on law-abiding citizens for political or any other reasons.
NEWS
By K. Riva Levinson | October 29, 2006
Regardless of past mistakes, the new Iraq still can be saved. In my opinion as an adviser to the Iraq Study Group, any rescue plan should focus on basic measures, including U.S. troop redeployment, prevention of oil theft and corruption, training of Iraqi troops, recognition of the influence of Iran and Syria, and promotion of democracy. Redeploy troops. Coalition forces should redeploy around critical infrastructure. They should have a defined space to defend instead of being sitting ducks for insurgents on the streets.
NEWS
By Henry F. Cooper | September 6, 2012
Recent reports suggest that the U.S. government was likely engaged in two very sophisticated cyber attacks: one that spied on Iran's nuclear program and another that slowed it by destroying centrifuges. These attacks encourage a twinge of national pride in our cyber capabilities. Yet there's a dark corollary to this news. Our enemies can use similarly sophisticated cyber tactics to attack the U.S. government and our private sector. Billions in intellectual property and state secrets are at risk, as well as the critical infrastructure that supports modern American life.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 17, 2004
WASHINGTON - Like millions of Americans, Jeannie Hong owns her own business, the Magic Dry Cleaners in Ellicott City. She has never been contacted by the Department of Homeland Security in Washington and doesn't expect she ever will be. She learns about terrorist threats and raised terror alert levels like most everyone else - by watching television or reading the newspaper. "I wouldn't think any of that has anything to do with dry cleaning," she says. Al Martinez-Fonts believes his new mission as head of the private-sector office at the Department of Homeland Security is to prove her wrong.
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