Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCrispus Attucks
IN THE NEWS

Crispus Attucks

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2000
YORK, Pa. -- They took on some of the biggest names in the fiercely competitive world of prep school basketball, and came out on top. They earned college scholarships, some to such big-time programs as Georgia and Nevada-Las Vegas. And even as the Crispus Attucks Eagles collected their championship rings, the school caught the eye of one of the country's best young players. All in the team's first season -- which, it turns out, will almost certainly be its last as a national force. You might think that an inaugural season with so much success would have been a hit in this southern Pennsylvania city, but few in York knew of the team's winning ways.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2012
At the Crispus Attucks rec center Wednesday, young children were sprawled on mats watching "The Cat in the Hat" while dreamily waving their small feet in the air. Nearby, older children bounced around a basketball court or rehearsed their parts in a presentation for parents. Their performance will mark much more than the end of summer camp. After more than 40 years of operation in West Baltimore's Madison Park neighborhood, Crispus Attucks is slated to close this month - one of at least four centers that will be shuttered under the city's long-planned overhaul of its recreation facilities.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2012
At the Crispus Attucks rec center Wednesday, young children were sprawled on mats watching "The Cat in the Hat" while dreamily waving their small feet in the air. Nearby, older children bounced around a basketball court or rehearsed their parts in a presentation for parents. Their performance will mark much more than the end of summer camp. After more than 40 years of operation in West Baltimore's Madison Park neighborhood, Crispus Attucks is slated to close this month - one of at least four centers that will be shuttered under the city's long-planned overhaul of its recreation facilities.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | February 26, 2007
ATLANTA -- If Carter G. Woodson had been clairvoyant, he might well have kept his idea for a week celebrating Negro history to himself. Had he known that the commemoration would become another exercise in marginalizing the contributions of black Americans, he might have stuck to educating more limited audiences through books and scholarly journals. Instead, in 1926, Woodson proposed an annual Negro History Week to be celebrated in February. It has metastasized into Black History Month - an annual slog through elementary school reports on George Washington Carver (as The Daily Show's Jon Stewart memorably put it, "the fellow who invented the peanut")
NEWS
By MARJORIE VALBRUN | May 20, 2006
President Bush's nationally televised speech this week on immigration reform may have jump-started stalled negotiations in Congress, but the real action and more colorful debate took place outside the halls of the Capitol a few days earlier. Just beyond the Senate building, on a grassy knoll that is the Upper Senate Park, an assortment of like-minded demonstrators - they prefer to be called patriots - held forth on the finer details of an issue that has lately divided Americans along racial, political and ethnic lines.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2001
Sam Sutton finally is getting the notice he never got at York (Pa.) High School, or at St. Francis College in rural Pennsylvania, where he played his first two years before transferring to Towson to play men's basketball. The success seems bittersweet. As the best player on a struggling squad with a 10-15 record, Sutton is as he was in his days at St. Francis - the big fish in a bad pond. "I've been thinking about that a lot lately," Sutton said after scoring 23 points and grabbing eight rebounds in a 77-63 loss to Delaware on Saturday night, the Tigers' sixth straight defeat.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | February 26, 2007
ATLANTA -- If Carter G. Woodson had been clairvoyant, he might well have kept his idea for a week celebrating Negro history to himself. Had he known that the commemoration would become another exercise in marginalizing the contributions of black Americans, he might have stuck to educating more limited audiences through books and scholarly journals. Instead, in 1926, Woodson proposed an annual Negro History Week to be celebrated in February. It has metastasized into Black History Month - an annual slog through elementary school reports on George Washington Carver (as The Daily Show's Jon Stewart memorably put it, "the fellow who invented the peanut")
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane | May 26, 1993
NOTICE: Gregory P. Kane may be a potential rapist.Having subjected myself to the same bit of calumny that some male students at the University of Maryland College Park were subjected to recently, I will now give my reaction to the act that calumniated them: A group of women at the university selected their names at random and put them on a list along with this notice:"These Men May Be Potential Rapists."The act was one of propagandistic genius -- a bold, daring masterstroke not equaled since the days of Samuel Adams.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | April 18, 2001
A trio of All-Metro basketball players will join North Carolina recruit Melvin Scott (Southern-Baltimore) in representing the metro area against a team of national standouts in the first Baltimore Charm City Challenge on April 28. Jai Lewis of Aberdeen, Darshan Luckey of Southern-Baltimore, and Kenny Minor of Dunbar are three of the 11 area players coached by Mike Daniel of Towson Catholic. Game time is 8:15 p.m. The national team will be led by a pair of Maryland-bound recruits: Andre Collins of Virginia and Mike Grinnon of New York.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2010
Ten city recreation centers in areas with "high concentrations of at-risk youth" will remain open for extended hours throughout the summer to provide a haven for children. The governor's Office of Crime Control and Prevention will spend about $86,000 in overtime pay for staffers to keep the centers open for three extra hours from Tuesdays through Fridays for one month beginning next week. "These funds will help keep neighborhood kids off the streets, giving them a positive and safe atmosphere to stay during those hot summer nights," said Gov. Martin O'Malley in a statement.
NEWS
By MARJORIE VALBRUN | May 20, 2006
President Bush's nationally televised speech this week on immigration reform may have jump-started stalled negotiations in Congress, but the real action and more colorful debate took place outside the halls of the Capitol a few days earlier. Just beyond the Senate building, on a grassy knoll that is the Upper Senate Park, an assortment of like-minded demonstrators - they prefer to be called patriots - held forth on the finer details of an issue that has lately divided Americans along racial, political and ethnic lines.
SPORTS
By Christian Ewell and Christian Ewell,SUN STAFF | February 22, 2001
Sam Sutton finally is getting the notice he never got at York (Pa.) High School, or at St. Francis College in rural Pennsylvania, where he played his first two years before transferring to Towson to play men's basketball. The success seems bittersweet. As the best player on a struggling squad with a 10-15 record, Sutton is as he was in his days at St. Francis - the big fish in a bad pond. "I've been thinking about that a lot lately," Sutton said after scoring 23 points and grabbing eight rebounds in a 77-63 loss to Delaware on Saturday night, the Tigers' sixth straight defeat.
SPORTS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2000
YORK, Pa. -- They took on some of the biggest names in the fiercely competitive world of prep school basketball, and came out on top. They earned college scholarships, some to such big-time programs as Georgia and Nevada-Las Vegas. And even as the Crispus Attucks Eagles collected their championship rings, the school caught the eye of one of the country's best young players. All in the team's first season -- which, it turns out, will almost certainly be its last as a national force. You might think that an inaugural season with so much success would have been a hit in this southern Pennsylvania city, but few in York knew of the team's winning ways.
NEWS
By Gregory P. Kane | May 26, 1993
NOTICE: Gregory P. Kane may be a potential rapist.Having subjected myself to the same bit of calumny that some male students at the University of Maryland College Park were subjected to recently, I will now give my reaction to the act that calumniated them: A group of women at the university selected their names at random and put them on a list along with this notice:"These Men May Be Potential Rapists."The act was one of propagandistic genius -- a bold, daring masterstroke not equaled since the days of Samuel Adams.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Sun Staff Writer | May 10, 1995
Tony Alexander McKoy's job as referee was to keep the peace at league basketball games in West Baltimore. Monday night, he was killed trying.Attempting to smooth over a dispute between a player and his coach, Mr. McKoy walked outside Crispus Attucks Recreation Center, and was shot in the back by a ballplayer, police said.Mr. McKoy, who would have celebrated his 30th birthday today and lived in the 1700 block of McCulloh St., a block from the recreation center, was killed as his 12-year-old son watched from a rec center window.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1996
Attorneys in the murder trial of a Baltimore man yesterday offered markedly different versions of how a fight over a neighborhood basketball game turned into death in the street.A key question emerged during the first day of the trial of Elijah Davis Jr.: Was Tony Alexander McKoy shot fighting for a gun or running away?Mr. McKoy was two days shy of his 30th birthday when he died May 8, a couple of hours after he and Mr. Davis had finished playing basketball at the Crispus Attucks Recreation Center in West Baltimore.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.