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Crisis Pregnancy Centers

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NEWS
By Eva M. Moore and Robert W. Bloom | November 17, 2009
A debate is raging as to whether there is sinister intent in proposed Baltimore City legislation requiring crisis pregnancy centers to be clear on the services they provide prospective clients. As physicians and public health professionals who live and work in Baltimore, we are surprised by the debate and troubled that there are those who would advocate for less than full transparency. In 1979, the United Nations adopted a resolution that recognizes the right of all women to "specific educational information to help to ensure the health and well-being of families, including information and advice on family planning," as well as "access to adequate health care facilities, including information, counseling and services on family planning."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 1, 2013
Rep. Andy Harris recently suggested that, rather than focusing on crisis pregnancy centers, "maybe the time, money, and attention of the mayor and city solicitor would be much better spent dealing with the increasing carnage on the streets of Baltimore" ( "City should stop attacking pregnancy centers," July 28). Lately, this seems to be a common refrain for conservatives: They need to stop complaining about ____ (insert any injustice in this space) and worry about all of the violence in their community.
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NEWS
July 26, 2013
In the last paragraph of his reply ( "Pregnancy center signs are necessary," July 24) to Marta H. Mossburg's opinion article about the ridiculousness of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's legal crusade against crisis pregnancy centers, Baltimore City Solicitor George Nilson reveals what his agenda and that of Mayor Rawlings-Blake really is - "to eliminate this threat to public health. " From a physician's point of view, that's a pretty interesting way to describe the usually faith-based, free charitable care to women who face a true life crisis - a crisis that exists because the government-run social welfare system fails to provide the care (other than abortion)
NEWS
July 26, 2013
In the last paragraph of his reply ( "Pregnancy center signs are necessary," July 24) to Marta H. Mossburg's opinion article about the ridiculousness of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's legal crusade against crisis pregnancy centers, Baltimore City Solicitor George Nilson reveals what his agenda and that of Mayor Rawlings-Blake really is - "to eliminate this threat to public health. " From a physician's point of view, that's a pretty interesting way to describe the usually faith-based, free charitable care to women who face a true life crisis - a crisis that exists because the government-run social welfare system fails to provide the care (other than abortion)
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | November 23, 2009
Both sides of the abortion debate will be focusing on Baltimore today, when the City Council is expected to approve a first-in-the-nation law imposing new regulations on faith-based organizations that try to steer women away from the procedure. The measure, introduced by council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake at the behest of Planned Parenthood of Maryland, would require that crisis pregnancy centers that do not provide abortions or birth control post signs saying so. Proponents frame the effort as a matter of public health.
NEWS
August 1, 2013
Rep. Andy Harris recently suggested that, rather than focusing on crisis pregnancy centers, "maybe the time, money, and attention of the mayor and city solicitor would be much better spent dealing with the increasing carnage on the streets of Baltimore" ( "City should stop attacking pregnancy centers," July 28). Lately, this seems to be a common refrain for conservatives: They need to stop complaining about ____ (insert any injustice in this space) and worry about all of the violence in their community.
FEATURES
By Matthew Hay Brown | matthew.brown@baltsun.com | November 23, 2009
Both sides of the abortion debate will be focusing on Baltimore today, when the City Council is expected to approve a first-in-the-nation law imposing new regulations on faith-based organizations that try to steer women away from the procedure. The measure, introduced by council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake at the behest of Planned Parenthood of Maryland, would require that crisis pregnancy centers that do not provide abortions or birth control post signs saying so. Proponents frame the effort as a matter of public health.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2002
Abortion-rights advocates asked the state attorney general's office yesterday to investigate "crisis pregnancy centers," which they say try to keep women from having abortions. In a meeting with Deputy Attorney General Carmen M. Shepard yesterday, representatives of the Maryland branch of the National Abortion Rights Action League outlined the group's undercover investigation of 17 such centers in the Baltimore-Washington area. The organization charges that many of the centers, which typically advertise free pregnancy tests and counseling, falsely present themselves as offering unbiased advice about a pregnant woman's options.
NEWS
November 1, 2009
The legislation proposed by Baltimore City Council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake to require crisis pregnancy centers that do not provide abortion or birth control services (or referrals for those services) to post a sign saying so has turned into a tempest in a teapot. Those clinics, which are nonprofits, say they're being singled out by abortion rights groups. Advocates from NARAL Pro-Choice Maryland say they've sent undercover interns to centers like those - including one in Baltimore - and found they were given inaccurate information about abortion, such as the myths that it causes cancer and infertility.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 25, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The anti-abortion Crisis Pregnancy Centers in Baltimore and four other Maryland locations are providing faulty information about abortion and birth control and are deceiving women into thinking they offer abortion services, a complaint to the state attorney general's office alleged yesterday."
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | November 23, 2009
Both sides of the abortion debate will be focusing on Baltimore today, when the City Council is expected to approve a first-in-the-nation law imposing new regulations on faith-based organizations that try to steer women away from the procedure. The measure, introduced by council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake at the behest of Planned Parenthood of Maryland, would require that crisis pregnancy centers that do not provide abortions or birth control post signs saying so. Proponents frame the effort as a matter of public health.
FEATURES
By Matthew Hay Brown | matthew.brown@baltsun.com | November 23, 2009
Both sides of the abortion debate will be focusing on Baltimore today, when the City Council is expected to approve a first-in-the-nation law imposing new regulations on faith-based organizations that try to steer women away from the procedure. The measure, introduced by council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake at the behest of Planned Parenthood of Maryland, would require that crisis pregnancy centers that do not provide abortions or birth control post signs saying so. Proponents frame the effort as a matter of public health.
NEWS
By Eva M. Moore and Robert W. Bloom | November 17, 2009
A debate is raging as to whether there is sinister intent in proposed Baltimore City legislation requiring crisis pregnancy centers to be clear on the services they provide prospective clients. As physicians and public health professionals who live and work in Baltimore, we are surprised by the debate and troubled that there are those who would advocate for less than full transparency. In 1979, the United Nations adopted a resolution that recognizes the right of all women to "specific educational information to help to ensure the health and well-being of families, including information and advice on family planning," as well as "access to adequate health care facilities, including information, counseling and services on family planning."
NEWS
November 1, 2009
The legislation proposed by Baltimore City Council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake to require crisis pregnancy centers that do not provide abortion or birth control services (or referrals for those services) to post a sign saying so has turned into a tempest in a teapot. Those clinics, which are nonprofits, say they're being singled out by abortion rights groups. Advocates from NARAL Pro-Choice Maryland say they've sent undercover interns to centers like those - including one in Baltimore - and found they were given inaccurate information about abortion, such as the myths that it causes cancer and infertility.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2002
Abortion-rights advocates asked the state attorney general's office yesterday to investigate "crisis pregnancy centers," which they say try to keep women from having abortions. In a meeting with Deputy Attorney General Carmen M. Shepard yesterday, representatives of the Maryland branch of the National Abortion Rights Action League outlined the group's undercover investigation of 17 such centers in the Baltimore-Washington area. The organization charges that many of the centers, which typically advertise free pregnancy tests and counseling, falsely present themselves as offering unbiased advice about a pregnant woman's options.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | July 25, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The anti-abortion Crisis Pregnancy Centers in Baltimore and four other Maryland locations are providing faulty information about abortion and birth control and are deceiving women into thinking they offer abortion services, a complaint to the state attorney general's office alleged yesterday."
NEWS
November 18, 2009
The Baltimore City Council approved a measure Monday night that would require crisis pregnancy centers that do not provide referrals to abortion or birth control to post a disclaimer. The bill, which is opposed by anti-abortion groups, would affect four city centers that offer counseling, prenatal care and baby clothes to pregnant women. An amendment that would have forced abortion clinics to also post disclaimers was not approved. The measure is slated for a final vote before being submitted to the mayor.
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