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ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2012
Crisfield, the hub of Maryland's crab industry, was severely damaged by Superstorm Sandy. The owners of Golden Ring Transportation, with some assistance of the Maryland Office of Tourism Development, are putting together a grassroots relief effort for the affected areas. A Golden Ring motorcoach will be parked in front of the National Aquarium on Friday, 6-10 a.m., accepting donations of food, clothing, blankets, toys, portable heaters, furnishings, cleaning supplies. Cash donations will be accepted, too, as will gently used items.
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SPORTS
September 13, 2014
Vingt-Neuf Bowmen Tuesdays through September: 3-D archery from 5 p.m. until dark at the Maryland State Game and Fish Protective Association, 8735 Honeygo Blvd., Perry Hall. Crab symposium Today, Sept. 14: The Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum in St. Michaels is presenting a "State of the Crab" symposium on three consecutive Sundays starting today from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. with a program titled "Crabs and People: Traditions and Perspectives. " Today's session focuses on the history of harvesting and regulations.
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NEWS
January 18, 1991
The Lower Eastern Shore town of Crisfield is probably more anxiously awaiting news from Saudi Arabia than any other Maryland community. Some 200 of its sons and daughters are on duty there after the call-up of their National Guard unit, the 1229th Transportation Company, in late November. All of them are assigned to short- and long-haul truck missions in the war zone.That is the largest proportionate call-up to the service we know within a Maryland community.For Crisfield, the separation has been wrenching.
NEWS
February 15, 2014
The recent letter to the editor from a Baltimore doctor critical of flood insurance as a benefit for the rich ("Government offers a flood of help for the rich," Feb. 12) is a good example of how intelligent people on the west side of the Chesapeake Bay just do not understand that flood insurance touches people who have lived in towns and rural areas of the lower Eastern Shore for generations. These locals are not wealthy and many are living on the edge, especially in all of the waterman communities.
NEWS
August 14, 1996
THE TOWN'S MAYOR has just been arrested and charged with perjury, insurance fraud and theft. The city manager has been asked by the local council to resign for costing the community money by missing grant-application deadlines. Crisfield should be in turmoil. Instead, folks in that isolated crabbing town on the lower Eastern Shore are blase about the whole thing.Yet Mayor Donald W. Gerald has been charged with serious crimes. And City Manager Harry T. Phoebus may have been inexcusably remiss in applying for state grants.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | July 20, 2011
Some things to consider if you're still on the fence about heading to Crisfield today for the 35th annual J. Millard Tawes Crab and Clam Bake. The weather: Triple-digit heat index . The crowd: It's an off election year, so some politicians, including Gov. Martin O'Malley, will be no-shows. That will make the event less appealing for some, more appealing for others. The food: As always, hot seafood on a hot blacktop. Annapolis lobbyist and Tawes booster Bruce Bereano is known for offering a more elaborate spread inside his corporate tent.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 21, 2012
Superstorm Sandy has left the small town of Crisfield reeling from floods that destroyed homes and power outages that persist three weeks after the deluge. But the storm hasn't dampened the community spirit in this Eastern Shore enclave. Scores of residents expect to come together on Thanksgiving for a community dinner at the Elks Lodge, which is serving turkey and all the traditional side dishes — the majority of the meal donated. In preparation, a sign on Highway 413 reads: "Come one, come all. Dinner at 3 p.m. " "We are opening the doors to everybody and will do the best we can to serve them," said John Mackenzie, who calls himself the lodge's "official poobah.
NEWS
June 27, 2006
Few places on the Chesapeake Bay reflect the economic uncertainties of the commercial seafood industry as much as the quaggy little Eastern Shore town of Crisfield. Once the second-largest city in Maryland, Crisfield grew rich on shellfish. During its oyster heyday, the town literally expanded out into Tangier Sound on the tons of shells discarded by the packinghouses. But when the industry began petering out four decades ago, the town that still wistfully calls itself "the crab capital of the world" seemed to sink deep into the marshes that nearly surround it. Faced with years of plant closings, foreclosures and a stagnant job picture, fewer than 3,000 people now live in the town.
NEWS
July 17, 1991
Gov. William Donald Schaefer canceled yesterday a visit he had planned to the annual J. Millard Tawes Crab and Clam Bake in Crisfield today, and State House sources attributed the change of plans to the governor's concern over the health of his longtime companion, Hilda Mae Snoops.The governor, however, scoffed at the suggestion, saying, "Boy, I hadn't heard that." But he acknowledged that Mrs. Snoops, who has been seen in public rarely in recent months, remains ill in the Governor's Mansion.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2012
Now this sounds like a blast. The annual Crab & Cruise weekend down in Crisfield is coming soon. Hundreds of seafood lovers from all over the country head to Somerset County every year for the Crab & Cruise weekend. The highlight of the two-day event is Saturday's all-you-can eat crab feast and a sunset cruise on the Chesapeake Bay. But there are late night parties on Friday an Saturday night and a VIP dinner on Friday with celebrity chef Maxcel Hardy, Amar'e Stoudemire's personal chef.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
A year ago, Hurricane Sandy was imminent, and now 12 months later, signs of recovery from the storm remain in Crisfield and Garrett County. In Crisfield, charity workers will on Monday dedicate the first two houses to be rebuilt since Sandy's winds and storm surge funneled floodwaters across the Eastern Shore town. Garrett County meanwhile is putting the finishing touches on a new emergency operations center that could help coordinate rescue efforts in future storms like Sandy, which dumped up to 3 feet of heavy, wet snow, cutting off power and stranding residents.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2013
Hurricane Sandy blew the waters of the Little Annemessex River into living rooms across the Somerset County town of Crisfield one year ago, displacing hundreds of families, some still homeless a year later. Their numbers began to shrink Monday when charity workers dedicated the first two houses to be rebuilt since the storm. Many others have been repaired. Across the state, thousands in Garrett County endured days without electricity after Sandy dumped more than two feet of unusually wet, heavy snow, and emergency officials managed rescue efforts from a courthouse basement with a slow Internet connection.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2013
Two men were rescued from a fishing boat in Ape Hole Creek near Crisfield on Wednesday after the boat began taking on water, according to the U.S. Coast Guard. The father of a man onboard the fishing boat, the Carolyn Jeanne, alerted crew members at Coast Guard Station Crisfield that the boat was sinking about 2:15 p.m., after his son called him, the Coast Guard said. The a 25-foot Coast Guard boat located the 41-foot Carolyn Jeanne near the Pocomoke Sound Wildlife Management Area about 15 minutes later and quickly made contact with the two men on board.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2013
Blaine Young, the combative Frederick County commission president who took an early lead in fund-raising among Republican candidates for governor, said Saturday that he will not attempt to succeed Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley in next year's election. Young announced at a Frederick County festival that he decided not to run after polls showed the difficulty of a Republican winning in a Democratic-dominated state. His decision was  expected because for months he had been sending pessimistic signals, saying the main reason he would run -- if he did -- would be to help other Republicans farther down the ballot.
NEWS
July 11, 2013
A recent commentator speculated about whether Smith Island can be rescued from oblivion ("Smith Island can be saved," July 7). I ask, why bother? For the 50 years I've lived in Maryland, I've heard Smith Island this, Smith Island that. I really believed there was something to Smith Island. Boy, was I wrong! During a recent environmental professional institute, I visited Tylerton, one of the communities on the group of islands that constitute Smith Island. With all due respect to the lovely folks with whom I interacted, why any tax dollars would be spent saving a swamp with 50 or so residents is beyond me. Approximately half the homes are shacks, boarded up and seemingly abandoned.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2013
- Hazel Cropper, for years the fastest crab picker in this city built on its seafood industry, worries about the storm drain a few feet from her living room. As volunteers assessed the damage Superstorm Sandy caused to her home, the 74-year-old noted that the drain backs up whenever it rains, flooding the street. She wondered if it would put her home back under water in the next big storm. "I try to not even think about it," said Cropper, who worked in crab houses most of her life and earned the nickname "Hurricane Hazel" for the speed at which she dismantled blue crabs at annual competitions she inevitably won. "I'm leaving it in God's hands.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2012
Fallston junior Jenna Caldwell scored twice and the Cougars captured the Class 1A state championship for the second straight year with a 2-0 victory over Crisfield at Washington College. "I'm just really glad, so happy we won," said Caldwell, a junior forward playing her first year on varsity. "Everyone on this team worked so hard to build our chemistry during the year and it has paid off. " Caldwell's first goal broke a scoreless tie 1:53 into the second half when she tapped in a crossing pass from senior Danielle McDiarmid.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2013
- Hazel Cropper, for years the fastest crab picker in this city built on its seafood industry, worries about the storm drain a few feet from her living room. As volunteers assessed the damage Superstorm Sandy caused to her home, the 74-year-old noted that the drain backs up whenever it rains, flooding the street. She wondered if it would put her home back under water in the next big storm. "I try to not even think about it," said Cropper, who worked in crab houses most of her life and earned the nickname "Hurricane Hazel" for the speed at which she dismantled blue crabs at annual competitions she inevitably won. "I'm leaving it in God's hands.
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