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NEWS
March 25, 2011
Like millions of Americans I have watched with amazement how calmly and stoically the Japanese people have reacted to their triple catastrophe of earthquake, tsunami and radiation releases from crippled nuclear plants. I believe that their reaction can be explained if one refers to the Hagakure, also known as the Book of the Samurai, which still forms the basis for many cultural beliefs even in modern Japan. Consider in Chapter Eleven, words written in the 18th century by Tsunetomo Yamamoto: "Meditation on inevitable death should be performed daily.
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NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
President Barack Obama laid out a sobering view of the international crises that have beset his administration this year - and tried to make the case for returning Democrats to the Senate majority - at a small gathering of political donors in Baltimore on Friday. Speaking at the home of a hedge fund manager who is among the country's foremost advocates for Israel, Obama said the Islamic State fighters who have taken over portions of Iraq and Syria have displayed "the kind of brutality that even by the standards of terrorists is extraordinary.
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NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
President Barack Obama laid out a sobering view of the international crises that have beset his administration this year - and tried to make the case for returning Democrats to the Senate majority - at a small gathering of political donors in Baltimore on Friday. Speaking at the home of a hedge fund manager who is among the country's foremost advocates for Israel, Obama said the Islamic State fighters who have taken over portions of Iraq and Syria have displayed "the kind of brutality that even by the standards of terrorists is extraordinary.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | October 22, 2013
First came the drama over the government shutdown. Then the showdown over the debt ceiling. Now another round of negotiations on the budget deficit. Pardon me for asking, but when exactly will Washington begin to deal with the crisis of jobs, wages and widening inequality? Job growth is slowing perilously. The Labor Department reported today that only 148,000 jobs were created in September - way down from the average of 207,000 new jobs a month in the first quarter of the year.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 5, 2007
LONDON -- When he took office last summer, Prime Minister Gordon Brown presented himself as the anti-Tony Blair: colorless but capable, dour but trustworthy. The idea was that he would be a burst of cool Scottish forthrightness after the murky spin and dissembling that had come to cloud perceptions of Blair's played-out government. It is a hard trick to pull off, dissociating yourself so completely from someone for whom you worked for a decade, as Brown had for Blair. At first, the new prime minister seemed to have succeeded.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 20, 1998
WASHINGTON -- As President Clinton struggles to put the Monica Lewinsky affair behind him, the United States is being tested by a larger number of foreign policy crises than at perhaps any other time in the 5 1/2 -year Clinton administration.Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein has blocked intrusive inspections of his nuclear, chemical and biological weapons programs, raising the prospect that the United Nations' seven-year effort to disarm Iraq will prove futile.North Korea threatens to restart its processing of nuclear-weapons fuel.
NEWS
November 22, 1996
THE UNITED Nations food summit in Rome highlights differences of opinion over what the problem is. At the last conference in 1974, many experts thought that world population had overtaken world food production. That turned out not to have been true then, and it is not true yet.Great philosophical questions were raised that were not susceptible to agreement. One is whether population growth is the problem and needs to be curtailed. Another pits the U.S., committed to biotechnological advance, against those who believe that genetically altered grains reduce nutrition and increase Third World dependence.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | March 4, 1993
What this country needs most in the crises ahead is hardly a secretary of defense with a bum ticker.Somali armed punks attacked foreign troops for spoiling all their fun.The Supreme Court found a part of the war on drugs that works and knocked it out.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2013
Corporate criminal fraud. Tainted meat on the menu. Prying reporters pounding on the door. Meet Jonathan Bernstein, crisis tamer. Bernstein, a University of Maryland University College graduate, steps in to smother public meltdowns like a lid on a crab pot. However, rarely is he the man before the cameras. As president of Bernstein Crisis Management Inc., which he founded in 1994, he guides international clientele through prevention, staff training and response. During a stint in the Army at Fort Meade, he received his degree (magna cum laude)
NEWS
By Garry Wills | January 4, 1995
Chicago -- James Woolsey's product was danger. He had to convince us that the CIA is still needed, though the occasion for setting it up has disappeared. ''It is still a dangerous world,'' he liked to say.The trouble is that the CIA has a history of augmenting danger, not eliminating it. It helped get us into avoidable crises -- as in its whole bungled history of dealings with Iran. It helped bring on the missile crisis with its assassination attempts against Fidel Castro. It made enemies by interfering in others' internal affairs.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | August 27, 2013
President Barack Obama, in a sea of foreign policy troubles, accepted his leadership responsibilities in a CNN interview last week while lamenting the complexity of these challenges. He noted the old Harry Truman dictum that "the buck stops" in the Oval Office and asserted U.S. power and influence in the world must be "in our long-term national interests. " He mentioned both in the context of the developing civil wars in Egypt and Syria and growing calls for American intervention. The reports that chemical weapons were used by the regime in Syria against the insurgents, he said, "starts getting to some core national interests that the United States has, both in terms of us making sure that weapons of mass destruction are not proliferating, as well as needing to protect our allies [and]
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2013
Corporate criminal fraud. Tainted meat on the menu. Prying reporters pounding on the door. Meet Jonathan Bernstein, crisis tamer. Bernstein, a University of Maryland University College graduate, steps in to smother public meltdowns like a lid on a crab pot. However, rarely is he the man before the cameras. As president of Bernstein Crisis Management Inc., which he founded in 1994, he guides international clientele through prevention, staff training and response. During a stint in the Army at Fort Meade, he received his degree (magna cum laude)
NEWS
April 10, 2013
It's facile to say that if the extreme right and left of American politics dislike something, it must be a good idea, but in the case of President Barack Obama's budget proposal, it may be true. The president is taking one more stab at a "grand bargain" on the budget that would reduce deficits to a manageable size, through a combination of tax increases and spending cuts - including cuts to Medicare and Social Security. Some liberal groups are promising primary challenges to any Democrats who vote for a reduction in future Social Security benefits.
NEWS
March 1, 2013
Congress must act immediately on a balanced approach that will stop dangerous cuts and instead invest in our children and communities by closing tax loopholes for the wealthiest Americans and big corporations ("Social Security braces for cuts," Feb. 26). We as a nation can ill afford cuts to education, law enforcement and emergency responders, food and drug safety, mental health services, research and innovation, programs senior citizens rely on, or to the Internal Revenue Service.
NEWS
February 12, 2013
The first State of the Union address of President Barack Obama's second term offered a list of new initiatives if not new ideas. Mr. Obama focused on improving the economic lot of the middle class, reforming the nation's immigration system, addressing climate change and finding a balanced approach to solving our budget problems. Aside from gun control - an issue thrust on the president's agenda by the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre - and a new, ominous nuclear test in North Korea, all of the themes from the speech could have had a home in any of President Obama's previous State of the Union addresses.
NEWS
By Lawrence A. Peskin | January 23, 2013
The State Department is probably very pleased with the outcome of last week's hostage crisis in Algeria, although given the loss of innocent lives it would be impolitic for officials to say so. In case you missed it, Islamic militants had held an unspecified number of people hostage at a gas field in eastern Algeria, including a small number of Americans. Dozens of militants and hostages - including three Americans, according to the U.S. - were killed during a series of attacks by the Algerian military.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | July 20, 2003
CHARLES P. Kindleberger was born in 1910, during a mild recession, and died at 92 on July 7, during a period history will probably label a feeble recovery. He witnessed 18 recessions, one Depression, five investment bubbles and five major financial crises - and that was just in the United States. He watched the 1990s stock psychosis with a mixture of glee and foreboding and with all his money in a Neuberger Berman short-term bond fund, one of the most conservative investments possible outside a mattress.
NEWS
September 8, 1994
President Clinton's return to Washington finds Cuba and Haiti at the top of his foreign-policy agenda. His response to both crises -- and they are genuine crises on a short fuse -- could vitally affect the national mood as congressional elections approach Nov. 8. Inevitably Republicans will be worrying about an "October surprise" orchestrated by a Democratic White House. But the president's options are limited -- and unpalatable.First, Haiti. Administration rhetoric would seem to have put the president in a box. Either he sends U.S. forces into Haiti, his advisers having declared a U.S. troop presence there "inevitable" and "certain," or he executes another embarrassing policy flip-flop.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2012
Marilyn L. Dannenfelser, who during her more than four-decade career served as an aide to six presidents of Towson University, died Saturday of breast cancer at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Riderwood resident was 63. "Marilyn was the heart and soul of Towson University," said Maravene Loeschke, the university's president. "She had the ability to make everyone feel respected, valued and even calmer when needed. She was a woman of talent, character and grace. " "She was a great person in her ability to make a president a president," said Susanna F. Craine, former longtime Towson spokeswoman.
BUSINESS
Jay Hancock | September 26, 2011
M&T Bank CEO Robert G. Wilmers couldn't believe the memo he got from another executive at the company about implementing just one small piece of last year's financial reform law. The new formula required by the Dodd-Frank Act for calculating deposit-insurance premiums takes 18 M&T employees working on four committees to gather 60 different numbers, the memo said. They plug those figures into 20 separate equations to derive M&T's "performance score. " The performance score "is then divided by 100, cubed, added to .09 and multiplied by 42.735" to come up with what the bank owes the government for deposit coverage, the memo said.
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