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NEWS
April 3, 1994
More than a decade after the Court of Appeals decided to permit photographing of criminal trials in Maryland, it may finally happen. A bill to remove a legislative ban on cameras in criminal trials has passed the state Senate and is awaiting action by the House Judiciary Committee. A hearing is set for this coming Wednesday.Civil and appellate courts have been open to cameras since 1981, subject to strict controls -- and the halls of justice still stand.Forty-one states permit photographing of criminal trials without the horrendous results predicted by opponents of camera coverage.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2013
As Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold sat through his criminal misconduct trial, behind him sat people hoping the testimony and guilty verdict could bolster their pending civil cases. Two former county employees were there, seeking fodder for cases in which they allege they were wrongfully fired, one for complaining about Leopold's behavior, the other for helping her co-worker with her claim. Also there were attorneys for the Maryland chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union who are building a case over allegations that Leopold ordered police to compile dossiers on his political opponents.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel | June 6, 2011
Maryland will allow anonymous juries starting Sept. 1, after the Court of Appeals voted 6-1 Monday to permit them in criminal trials when a judge believes juror safety, harassment or tampering is a concern. The judges said juror anonymity should be a rare exception. The new rules call for all jurors to be referred to by number, not name. They allow a judge to determine if there is a reason in each case to protect the identity of jurors. Chief Judge Robert M. Bell, the lone dissenter, said he had a philosophical problem with it. "I just cannot get my arms around an anonymous jury, especially in a death penalty case," he said before voting.
NEWS
June 7, 2012
For those who missed it, there was a relatively brief protest conducted early this week by several dozen people employed by the Baltimore City Circuit Court. They were upset by the deplorable conditions in both the Clarence M. Mitchell Jr. Courthouse and the Courthouse East building and marched in front of City Hall, waving signs and threatening to sue. If it all looked a bit familiar, that's because it was. Courthouse workers have been unhappy with the miserable conditions and have been staging similar rallies for years, if not decades.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Sun Staff Writer | February 1, 1994
An Annapolis lawyer running for county state's attorney charged yesterday that the incumbent's policy of allowing prosecutors to practice civil law part time has delayed criminal trials.At a news conference, John R. Greiber Jr. cited statistics showing that State's Attorney Frank R. Weathersbee's office exceeds the state average for the length of time between when a criminal complaint is filed and when the case is completed.In Anne Arundel, the average number of days between the initiation and completion of the case rose from 138 days to 144 days in the 12-month period ending June 30, according to the annual report by the administrative office of the courts.
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,Sun reporter | November 6, 2007
The Maryland court system considered allowing cameras in criminal trials last night, weighing impassioned testimony from journalists arguing for the public's right to know against trial lawyers' and victims advocates' arguments for privacy protection. The state judiciary is tackling the matter because of budding interest among legislators to explore greater media access in criminal proceedings. Bills to allow cameras in criminal courts have been discussed in the past two General Assembly sessions but failed on both occasions in the House Judiciary Committee.
NEWS
By Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 19, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A federal judicial committee voted yesterday to allow television coverage of federal criminal trials, the first step toward relaxing a half-century-old ban on such broadcasts.If the proposal makes it through several more layers of review, federal criminal trials could be televised and broadcast on radio starting in about two years -- experimentally.TV broadcasts of criminal trials are allowed in 39 states, but a ban has existed under a federal court rule. Yesterday's action by a rules advisory committee was the opening move toward ending that ban.Broadcasts could occur only if the ban is lifted by the U.S. Judicial Conference, the policy-making arm of the federal courts, and approved by the Supreme Court and Congress.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 19, 1994
WASHINGTON -- A federal judicial committee voted yesterday to allow television coverage of federal criminal trials, the first step toward relaxing a half-century-old ban on such broadcasts.If the proposal makes it through several more layers of review, federal criminal trials could be televised and broadcast on radio starting in about two years -- at least on an experimental basis.TV broadcasts of criminal trials are allowed in 39 states, but a ban has existed under a federal court rule. Yesterday's action by a rules advisory committee was the opening move toward ending that ban.Broadcasts could occur only if the ban is lifted by the U.S. Judicial Conference, the policy-making arm of the federal courts, and approved by the Supreme Court and Congress.
BUSINESS
By Gary Cohn and Gary Cohn,Sun Staff Writer | February 12, 1994
Millions of television viewers across the country watched the William Kennedy Smith rape trial from Florida and the Menendez brothers murder trial from California. But had those trials been held in Maryland, there would have been a TV blackout.Maryland is one of only four states that do not permit some TV coverage of criminal trials. Camera coverage of appellate hearings is allowed in Maryland, and of civil trials in limited circumstances. But now, the prohibition against televising criminal trials, which was mandated by the legislature in 1981, may soon be lifted.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Staff Writer | August 7, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In an effort to help battered women who assault or kill their abusing husbands or boyfriends defend themselves in court, a Maryland congresswoman yesterday proposed that Congress encourage state courts to admit expert testimony about the nature and effects of domestic violence.Rep. Constance A. Morella, R-Md.-8th, said her legislation is similar to a law enacted by Maryland's General Assembly in 1991, which permits evidence of "battered spouse syndrome" to be introduced in Maryland criminal trials.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2011
While the Maryland Board of Physicians weighs professional charges against one cardiologist accused of placing heart stents into hundreds of patients who didn't need them, a federal jury in Baltimore is considering criminal charges against another. The health care fraud trial of Dr. John R. McLean, who practiced at a hospital on the Eastern Shore before surrendering his medical privileges in 2007, opened Tuesday in Baltimore's U.S. District Court. Prosecutors outlined a set of allegations against him that are startlingly similar to those against Towson cardiologist Mark Midei, who practiced at St. Joseph Medical Center and was charged administratively - not criminally - last year with violating the Medical Practice Act. Both men are accused of falsifying patient records in order to justify hundreds of medically unnecessary procedures, specifically the placement of coronary stents into relatively healthy arteries, ostensibly to prop them open.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel | June 6, 2011
Maryland will allow anonymous juries starting Sept. 1, after the Court of Appeals voted 6-1 Monday to permit them in criminal trials when a judge believes juror safety, harassment or tampering is a concern. The judges said juror anonymity should be a rare exception. The new rules call for all jurors to be referred to by number, not name. They allow a judge to determine if there is a reason in each case to protect the identity of jurors. Chief Judge Robert M. Bell, the lone dissenter, said he had a philosophical problem with it. "I just cannot get my arms around an anonymous jury, especially in a death penalty case," he said before voting.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,annie.linskey@baltsun.com | March 11, 2009
Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon's trial on theft, perjury and misuse-of-office charges could be held in early September, a Circuit Court judge ruled yesterday after meeting for the first time with prosecutors and defense attorneys. While the hearing was closed to the public, fresh details have emerged from court files that have grown thicker since indictments were handed down earlier this year in a wide-ranging City Hall corruption probe that also implicates City Councilwoman Helen L. Holton and developer Ronald H. Lipscomb.
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,Sun reporter | November 6, 2007
The Maryland court system considered allowing cameras in criminal trials last night, weighing impassioned testimony from journalists arguing for the public's right to know against trial lawyers' and victims advocates' arguments for privacy protection. The state judiciary is tackling the matter because of budding interest among legislators to explore greater media access in criminal proceedings. Bills to allow cameras in criminal courts have been discussed in the past two General Assembly sessions but failed on both occasions in the House Judiciary Committee.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,Sun Reporter | April 22, 2007
With the name "Innocence Project" on her office door, it's not surprising that Michele Nethercott receives a lot of mail from people locked up in Maryland's prisons. But in the past few weeks - as news spread that longtime police gun expert Joseph Kopera was found to have lied about his qualifications on witness stands across the state - the volume of letters has picked up. So much so, in fact, that her plastic mailbox fell off the wall. "It's been overflowing for about the last two weeks," said Nethercott, chief of the small unit of state public defenders who represent people they believe have been wrongfully convicted.
NEWS
By GUS G. SENTEMENTES and GUS G. SENTEMENTES,SUN REPORTER | January 26, 2006
Two Baltimore police officers are under internal investigation for possibly committing perjury during a trial last year in which one of the officers was ultimately cleared of charges that he threatened a person with his gun outside a Canton bar. The officers - Hadyn D. Gross and Anita C. Pitts - are being investigated by the department's Internal Investigative Division, police confirmed yesterday. Matt Jablow, a police spokesman, said the investigation is administrative, not criminal.
NEWS
February 5, 1994
Once upon a time a camera was a cumbersome tool. It was bulky, noisy and depended on bright lighting. Because cameras were unacceptably intrusive in court rooms, they generally were banned. But those exclusions make as much sense today as would a law setting horse-and-buggy speed limits on interstate highways.Most states now permit cameras and recording equipment in court. Many permit live telecasting, enough to keep a cable TV network fully occupied. In Maryland, civil trials and appellate hearings are open to camera coverage, under strict rules.
NEWS
October 5, 1995
On The Sun's front page Wednesday was a moment-of-verdict, full-color picture of a clenched-fists O. J Simpson, flanked by F. Lee Bailey and Johnnie Cochran, with Robert Shapiro in the deep background. It was a perfect complement to the reporting and commentary. It added a lot to readers' sense of the story in all of its dimensions.If the O. J. trial had taken place in Maryland, you would not have seen that picture. There would have been no pictures of any sort from inside the courtroom. No still photographs in newspapers and magazines.
NEWS
By DAVID G. SAVAGE and DAVID G. SAVAGE,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 5, 2006
WASHINGTON -- In a small victory for the Bush administration, the Supreme Court cleared the way yesterday for Jose Padilla to be released from a military brig and moved to a jail in Miami for a criminal trial. It was the latest turn in the saga of the Bronx-born Muslim who was once accused of plotting to detonate a radioactive "dirty bomb." The high court's brief and unanimous order ends a spat with the conservative U.S. appeals court in Virginia that had blocked the transfer of Padilla to the criminal court.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | November 4, 2004
A federal jury convicted a former Enron Corp. executive and four former Merrill Lynch & Co. officials yesterday in the first criminal trial arising from the accounting fraud that led to the energy trader's collapse. The verdicts in the case, in which prosecutors laid out evidence and strategies that may be used in later Enron prosecutions, lent some momentum to the government as it prepares for the trials next year of former Enron chief executives Jeffrey K. Skilling and Kenneth L. Lay. Convicted of one count of conspiracy and two counts of wire fraud were former Merrill investment banking chief Daniel H. Bayly, 57; former Enron finance executive Daniel O. Boyle, 48; former Merrill strategic financial group chief James A. Brown, 52; former Merrill managing director Robert S. Furst, 43; and former Merrill vice president William R. Fuhs, 36. Brown was also convicted of two counts of making false statements, and Boyle was convicted of one count of making a false statement.
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