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By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1996
Two former Howard County police chiefs announced their endorsement yesterday of District Judge Lenore R. Gelfman and attorney Jonathan Scott Smith in their bid for seats on the Howard County Circuit Court.Robert O. Mathews and Paul H. Rappaport cited the "extensive criminal law experience" of the challengers -- who are campaigning on a tough-on-crime theme -- as reasons for their endorsements."If we are going to make our community safe and protect our children, we need judges like Mr. Smith and Judge Gelfman, who have prosecuted criminals," Rappaport, an attorney in private practice who ran unsuccessfully as a Republican candidate for lieutenant governor in 1994, said at the news conference.
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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | April 15, 2013
On Thursday, April 18, lawyers and judges from Maryland's courts will share their expertise and personal experiences to help area students learn about law and society. Students attending the Civics and Law Academy will meet face-to-face with judges and other legal professionals to discuss a variety of topics, including juvenile rights, criminal law, free speech and the law in the technology age. The April 18 session will be held at North Harford High School in Pylesville, and will include more than 100 students from North Harford, Joppatowne, Bel Air, Edgewood, Aberdeen, Fallston and Havre de Grace high schools.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2001
John M. Brumbaugh, who educated generations of lawyers at the University of Maryland, died Friday at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson of a heart attack. He was 74. Mr. Brumbaugh had lived in Roland Park before moving to the Fairhaven retirement community in Sykesville three years ago. In 1956, he joined the faculty at the University of Maryland School of Law, where he taught criminal law, evidence, trademarks, unfair competition and patent law. He retired in 1996, when he was named distinguished service scholar emeritus, but continued to teach.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel | January 28, 2010
A judge handed down the maximum traffic violation fines Wednesday to two people blamed in a fatal accident in Glen Burnie. Bobbi L. Steiner, 25, of Glen Burnie and Jason R. Fisher, 42, of Derwood, Montgomery County, were fined $500 each and ordered into a driver improvement program after Anne Arundel District Judge Jonas D. Legum found Steiner guilty of negligent driving and Fisher of negligent driving and not controlling his truck's speed....
NEWS
October 4, 2004
Rendon honored by small-business administration Elizabeth Rendon, president and owner of Columbia-based Lingual Information System Technologies Inc. (LinguaLISTek), received the U.S. Small Business Administration's Minority Small Business Person of the Year Award for Region III, which includes Maryland, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Delaware. LinguaLISTek was one of 10 minority-owned businesses chosen for the award from a national pool of candidates. The awards were presented during the National Minority Enterprise Development Week Conference, held Sept.
NEWS
October 24, 1994
After months of name-calling and enough dueling statistics to confuse a mathematician, the state's attorney's race in Anne Arundel County boils down to two qualities: experience and credibility. Incumbent Democrat Frank R. Weathersbee possesses both; Republican John R. Greiber Jr. does not.Think about this: If you are charged with a crime, you want an experienced criminal lawyer to defend you. By the same token, citizens want the person prosecuting criminals to possess some expertise in the field.
NEWS
August 31, 1994
The bitterest contest in the 1994 Anne Arundel County elections is the race for state's attorney between incumbent Democrat Frank Weathersbee and Republican John Greiber. Since neither candidate drew a primary foe, their general election campaign started in July.The aggressive, motor-mouthed Mr. Greiber has been attacking the state's attorney for nearly a year, accusing him of being ineffective and making the state's attorney's office a "playground for politics." Mr. Weathersbee, who usually sounds like he couldn't muster the passion to kill a fly, has called Mr. Greiber the kind of guy "who looks like he would shoot a sick puppy" and warns voters to beware of a "demagogue" with little prosecutorial experience but lots of ambition.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,Sun Staff Writer | July 30, 1995
O. J. Simpson's lead attorney, Johnnie L. Cochran Jr., took time out from "the trial of the century" to talk yesterday with other lawyers convening in Baltimore.He criticized as "moral, social and economic genocide for our people" what he parodied as the Republicans' 'Contract on America,' " and a California trend toward altering jury structures. He said the use of television cameras in the courtroom is appropriate in the Simpson case, but not necessarily in all cases.And he expressed fear of racial polarization occurring in the United States and told of difficulties facing black youth, such as poverty and inadequate educational and career opportunities.
NEWS
By Randall D. Eliason | May 29, 2007
In early 1993, after the election of Bill Clinton to the White House, I was one of the federal prosecutors working on the criminal investigation of a powerful Democratic congressman, Dan Rostenkowski of Illinois. Shortly after Mr. Clinton took office, the Republican U.S. attorney in Washington, along with every U.S. attorney in the country, was replaced. But our investigation of the influential chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee never lost a step. Under the new Democratic U.S. attorney in the Washington office and U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno, Mr. Rostenkowski soon was indicted and ultimately convicted.
NEWS
By Gene Healy | June 17, 2005
WASHINGTON - Drug warriors in Congress are considering a bill that would send parents to jail for at least three years if they learn of drug activity near their children and fail to report it to authorities within 24 hours. One wonders if this a good idea, especially in areas such as Baltimore, where intimidation and murder of government witnesses are common. But when it comes to the criminal law, Congress rarely pauses for reflection anymore. In April, the bill's author, Republican Rep. F. James Sensenbrenner Jr. of Wisconsin, floated what might be called the "Jail Janet Jackson" initiative.
NEWS
May 7, 2009
Witness, jury intimidation shows need for reform The paper's Page One story concerning an act of witness intimidation ("Courtroom threat shakes witness, jury," May 5) should be of concern to every citizen in the United States. It is obvious in the area of criminal law we are faced with 21st century crimes but practicing 19th and 20th century criminal law practice and procedures. This must change! The governor or legislature should convene a committee to review conditions as they exist today and what can be done to improve, if not correct, what we are experiencing.
NEWS
By Randall D. Eliason | May 29, 2007
In early 1993, after the election of Bill Clinton to the White House, I was one of the federal prosecutors working on the criminal investigation of a powerful Democratic congressman, Dan Rostenkowski of Illinois. Shortly after Mr. Clinton took office, the Republican U.S. attorney in Washington, along with every U.S. attorney in the country, was replaced. But our investigation of the influential chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee never lost a step. Under the new Democratic U.S. attorney in the Washington office and U.S. Attorney General Janet Reno, Mr. Rostenkowski soon was indicted and ultimately convicted.
NEWS
By Gene Healy | June 17, 2005
WASHINGTON - Drug warriors in Congress are considering a bill that would send parents to jail for at least three years if they learn of drug activity near their children and fail to report it to authorities within 24 hours. One wonders if this a good idea, especially in areas such as Baltimore, where intimidation and murder of government witnesses are common. But when it comes to the criminal law, Congress rarely pauses for reflection anymore. In April, the bill's author, Republican Rep. F. James Sensenbrenner Jr. of Wisconsin, floated what might be called the "Jail Janet Jackson" initiative.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2005
Homicides usually produce clear-cut evidence of a crime - dead bodies. In bank robberies, surveillance tapes point out the crooks. But experts say public corruption cases often start out with investigators trying to determine if any criminal act has been committed. That's why former prosecutors and legal scholars believe it was neither unusual nor unexpected to see Maryland U.S. Attorney Allen F. Loucks close the books Friday on the investigation into the Baltimore City Council without producing a single indictment.
NEWS
October 4, 2004
Rendon honored by small-business administration Elizabeth Rendon, president and owner of Columbia-based Lingual Information System Technologies Inc. (LinguaLISTek), received the U.S. Small Business Administration's Minority Small Business Person of the Year Award for Region III, which includes Maryland, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Pennsylvania and Delaware. LinguaLISTek was one of 10 minority-owned businesses chosen for the award from a national pool of candidates. The awards were presented during the National Minority Enterprise Development Week Conference, held Sept.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2003
To the dismay of prosecutors, a man considered to be one of the worst drug lords in Baltimore history was freed yesterday of what had been a 22-year sentence for a gun crime and vowed as he walked away from the city's federal courthouse to dedicate his life to serving God. Melvin "Little Melvin" Williams, 61, served nearly four years on a handgun possession conviction before his attorney successfully argued that Williams did not meet the technical requirements...
NEWS
July 8, 1991
Two of the most symbolic decisions of the liberal "Warren Court" were in the field of criminal law. The "exclusionary rule" limiting police searches and seizures was applied to the states 30 years ago and the "Miranda warning" limiting police use of some confessions was enunciated 25 years ago. This term the Supreme Court of Chief Justice William Rehnquist greatly weakened both. In a 5-4 decision, the court said coerced confessions could be used in court in some instances. In a 6-3 decision the court approved some warrantless searches without probable cause.
NEWS
May 7, 2009
Witness, jury intimidation shows need for reform The paper's Page One story concerning an act of witness intimidation ("Courtroom threat shakes witness, jury," May 5) should be of concern to every citizen in the United States. It is obvious in the area of criminal law we are faced with 21st century crimes but practicing 19th and 20th century criminal law practice and procedures. This must change! The governor or legislature should convene a committee to review conditions as they exist today and what can be done to improve, if not correct, what we are experiencing.
NEWS
By George F. Will | November 22, 2001
WASHINGTON - A foolishness of recent decades - a fetishism of rights without parameters - has been partially purged by the heat of burning jet fuel. Sobriety is evident in the mostly temperate response to President Bush's revival of the traditional wartime option of trying unlawful foreign belligerents in military tribunals. In these, evidentiary and procedural rules would be less favorable to defendants than in the criminal justice system, and there would be no appeal to the judicial system for trials held abroad for alien terrorists.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | August 7, 2001
John M. Brumbaugh, who educated generations of lawyers at the University of Maryland, died Friday at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson of a heart attack. He was 74. Mr. Brumbaugh had lived in Roland Park before moving to the Fairhaven retirement community in Sykesville three years ago. In 1956, he joined the faculty at the University of Maryland School of Law, where he taught criminal law, evidence, trademarks, unfair competition and patent law. He retired in 1996, when he was named distinguished service scholar emeritus, but continued to teach.
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