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April 28, 2012
The criminal defense lawyers make the fair and typical plea for the "right to privacy" on behalf of the violent suspects they represent, but they ignore that the victim of a crime, be it an individual, a store or whatever, has not only lost their privacy but considerably more in the process ("Maryland police continue to collect DNA samples," April 26). There are consequences to bad behavior and if giving up your DNA is one of them, so be it. Peter Bell, Monkton
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NEWS
By Michael Schatzow and Mitchell Y. Mirviss | March 28, 2014
"A poor man accused of a crime has no lobby," Robert F. Kennedy said 51 years ago, when, as U.S. Attorney General, he demanded legislation requiring counsel for federal criminal defendants. The legislation passed, much to Kennedy's credit, and, for the last half-century, counsel has been present at federal bail hearings. But not in Maryland. No Bobby Kennedy has taken leadership to fix our broken criminal justice system. And there is no lobby to oppose the vested economic interests (bail bondsmen and some criminal defense lawyers)
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NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | November 6, 1994
In a spate of advertising that began last week, two of the three candidates for state's attorney have turned to blasting each other's records while lambasting the third's lack of criminal courtroom experience.The opening shot in the barrage of negative newspaper ads came from Thomas E. Hickman, the incumbent who was defeated in the Republican primary and is waging a write-in campaign.In one ad, a series of headlines asking "Did You Know?" is followed by shots at Democratic candidate Linda A. Holmes and Republican Jerry F. Barnes.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2012
A defense attorney for George Huguely V has filed a motion in a Charlottesville, Va., court requesting a retrial for the former University of Virginia lacrosse player convicted of second-degree murder and grand larceny in the 2010 beating death of his former girlfriend, Yeardley Love. The motion to set aside that verdict and schedule a new trial, and a memorandum in support of the motion, were filed Friday, which was the deadline. The motion questions many aspects of the February trial, including the selection and treatment of the jury - which recommended that Huguely serve a total of 26 years in prison for Love's death and the theft of her laptop - and the handling of an illness suffered by one of Huguely's attorneys during the trial.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2012
A defense attorney for George Huguely V has filed a motion in a Charlottesville, Va., court requesting a retrial for the former University of Virginia lacrosse player convicted of second-degree murder and grand larceny in the 2010 beating death of his former girlfriend, Yeardley Love. The motion to set aside that verdict and schedule a new trial, and a memorandum in support of the motion, were filed Friday, which was the deadline. The motion questions many aspects of the February trial, including the selection and treatment of the jury - which recommended that Huguely serve a total of 26 years in prison for Love's death and the theft of her laptop - and the handling of an illness suffered by one of Huguely's attorneys during the trial.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 23, 1997
WASHINGTON -- America's crime victims, who have long felt rudely shoved aside when the government prosecuted their offenders, are suddenly gaining visibility and influence in the process.They insist they do not want veto power over how prosecutors deal with criminals, but they do want a voice -- and they want a guaranteed chance to observe throughout. More and more, that's exactly what they are getting.When Timothy J. McVeigh goes on trial in Denver later this month in the bombing of Oklahoma City's federal building, for example, victims' families back home in Oklahoma will be able to watch on closed-circuit television.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2011
In 2007, Anthony Grandison, a onetime reputed Baltimore drug lord and convicted murderer who has spent most of the past 27 years on death row, fired the lawyers the public defender's office hired to represent him in his latest efforts to win a new trial or new sentence. He did it after he learned that the public defender's office wouldn't replace those attorneys — one of whom told the judge that Grandison had fired about 11 lawyers since 1983, when he was charged with capital murder of a would-be witness against him and the man's sister-in-law at a Baltimore County motel.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | July 20, 1994
If there's a lack of balance in the news coverage of the O.J. Simpson affair, it shows in the choice of legal experts and commentators hired by the TV networks.There are a few prosecutors and judges. But most of the experts are criminal defense lawyers who gained fame and wealth by winning freedom for assorted nasties and slimeballs.Because they are defense-minded, they see the trial as an elaborate game in which motions to suppress evidence and aiming zingy questions at nervous witnesses are more important than getting at the truth.
NEWS
By Michael Schatzow and Mitchell Y. Mirviss | March 28, 2014
"A poor man accused of a crime has no lobby," Robert F. Kennedy said 51 years ago, when, as U.S. Attorney General, he demanded legislation requiring counsel for federal criminal defendants. The legislation passed, much to Kennedy's credit, and, for the last half-century, counsel has been present at federal bail hearings. But not in Maryland. No Bobby Kennedy has taken leadership to fix our broken criminal justice system. And there is no lobby to oppose the vested economic interests (bail bondsmen and some criminal defense lawyers)
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2012
Maybe it was just as well George Huguely's defense lawyers screwed up their handling of a final witness, keeping him off the stand. His name: Jack Daniel. Yes, a forensic pathologist who shares a name with a whiskey was slated to testify on behalf of the lacrosse player accused of killing his ex-girlfriend in a drunken rage. We'll never know what the good doctor would have contributed to the defense of Huguely had he not been kept off the stand by a big mistake. After a two-week trial, jurors will begin deliberations Wednesday on whether Huguely killed Yeardley Love, the 22-year-old Cockeysville native who also was a University of Virginia lacrosse player.
NEWS
April 28, 2012
The criminal defense lawyers make the fair and typical plea for the "right to privacy" on behalf of the violent suspects they represent, but they ignore that the victim of a crime, be it an individual, a store or whatever, has not only lost their privacy but considerably more in the process ("Maryland police continue to collect DNA samples," April 26). There are consequences to bad behavior and if giving up your DNA is one of them, so be it. Peter Bell, Monkton
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2012
The last thing George Huguely V's lawyer said as he left the courthouse at the end of his client's murder trial this week was that he looked "forward to some corrections on what happened here. " It is unclear whether he thought mistakes had been made by the jury - which found Huguely, 24, guilty of second-degree murder and grand larceny in the beating death of Yeardley Love, recommending a 26-year prison term - or by the legal teams. The lawyer, Francis McQ. Lawrence, did not respond to a request for comment.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2012
Maybe it was just as well George Huguely's defense lawyers screwed up their handling of a final witness, keeping him off the stand. His name: Jack Daniel. Yes, a forensic pathologist who shares a name with a whiskey was slated to testify on behalf of the lacrosse player accused of killing his ex-girlfriend in a drunken rage. We'll never know what the good doctor would have contributed to the defense of Huguely had he not been kept off the stand by a big mistake. After a two-week trial, jurors will begin deliberations Wednesday on whether Huguely killed Yeardley Love, the 22-year-old Cockeysville native who also was a University of Virginia lacrosse player.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2012
One by one, potential jurors in the murder case against George W. Huguely V, who's accused of beating his former girlfriend to death when they were both University of Virginia students, took the witness stand Monday and revealed just how difficult it could be to seat an impartial jury. They'd all heard about the high-profile case, and several said they had already made up their minds. "It's obviously been discussed with my family and friends," said one young woman whose brother was a U.Va.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2011
In 2007, Anthony Grandison, a onetime reputed Baltimore drug lord and convicted murderer who has spent most of the past 27 years on death row, fired the lawyers the public defender's office hired to represent him in his latest efforts to win a new trial or new sentence. He did it after he learned that the public defender's office wouldn't replace those attorneys — one of whom told the judge that Grandison had fired about 11 lawyers since 1983, when he was charged with capital murder of a would-be witness against him and the man's sister-in-law at a Baltimore County motel.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | January 31, 2004
Maria Cristina Gutierrez, a criminal defense lawyer known in Maryland's legal community for her passionate and pugnacious style, died of a heart attack yesterday at St. Joseph Medical Center in Towson. The 52-year-old woman's ailment was exacerbated by multiple sclerosis. Throughout the 1990s, Ms. Gutierrez argued cases with a tenacity that earned the respect of her peers. Upon graduating from the University of Baltimore School of Law in 1980, she began her career as an assistant public defender in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | February 6, 2012
One by one, potential jurors in the murder case against George W. Huguely V, who's accused of beating his former girlfriend to death when they were both University of Virginia students, took the witness stand Monday and revealed just how difficult it could be to seat an impartial jury. They'd all heard about the high-profile case, and several said they had already made up their minds. "It's obviously been discussed with my family and friends," said one young woman whose brother was a U.Va.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2012
The last thing George Huguely V's lawyer said as he left the courthouse at the end of his client's murder trial this week was that he looked "forward to some corrections on what happened here. " It is unclear whether he thought mistakes had been made by the jury - which found Huguely, 24, guilty of second-degree murder and grand larceny in the beating death of Yeardley Love, recommending a 26-year prison term - or by the legal teams. The lawyer, Francis McQ. Lawrence, did not respond to a request for comment.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 23, 1997
WASHINGTON -- America's crime victims, who have long felt rudely shoved aside when the government prosecuted their offenders, are suddenly gaining visibility and influence in the process.They insist they do not want veto power over how prosecutors deal with criminals, but they do want a voice -- and they want a guaranteed chance to observe throughout. More and more, that's exactly what they are getting.When Timothy J. McVeigh goes on trial in Denver later this month in the bombing of Oklahoma City's federal building, for example, victims' families back home in Oklahoma will be able to watch on closed-circuit television.
NEWS
By Darren M. Allen and Darren M. Allen,Sun Staff Writer | November 6, 1994
In a spate of advertising that began last week, two of the three candidates for state's attorney have turned to blasting each other's records while lambasting the third's lack of criminal courtroom experience.The opening shot in the barrage of negative newspaper ads came from Thomas E. Hickman, the incumbent who was defeated in the Republican primary and is waging a write-in campaign.In one ad, a series of headlines asking "Did You Know?" is followed by shots at Democratic candidate Linda A. Holmes and Republican Jerry F. Barnes.
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