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By Los Angeles Times | February 19, 1993
MOSCOW -- Russian legislators, making a historic update to the Criminal Code, have revoked the law that let czars and Communists alike sentence many of Russia's illustrious sons and daughters -- from Fyodor Dostoevsky to Soviet-era dissidents -- to Siberian exile or banishment."
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NEWS
By PETER HERMANN | April 22, 2009
The problem with plea bargains is not always that the guilty get breaks but that the best lawyerly arguments stay forever muffled. I was prepared Monday for one of those great debates, in the most unlikely of places: the halls of justice at the John R. Hargrove Sr. District Court building on Patapsco Avenue in Brooklyn. But the prosecutor and the big-name defense attorney made a deal, no matter that they disagreed completely on who would have prevailed at trial. That's how the case of Nicholas Foster, who became an object of vitriol when he was charged with forging a coveted parking pass for the car-clogged streets of South Baltimore's Otterbein and trying to sell it on Craigslist, ended with a perfunctory nod from Judge Charles A. Chiapparelli and both sides claiming victory.
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NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2002
Authorities investigating a Maryland anti-crime agency overseen by Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend are evaluating whether criminal charges could be brought under a broadly drawn law designed to protect the vast sums of money distributed each year through federal programs, sources and legal experts said. The statute has been widely successful in public corruption cases in other states. It makes it illegal for an agent or employee of a local agency that receives U.S. dollars to use the money for any purpose other than for what it was intended.
NEWS
By Gene Healy | June 17, 2005
WASHINGTON - Drug warriors in Congress are considering a bill that would send parents to jail for at least three years if they learn of drug activity near their children and fail to report it to authorities within 24 hours. One wonders if this a good idea, especially in areas such as Baltimore, where intimidation and murder of government witnesses are common. But when it comes to the criminal law, Congress rarely pauses for reflection anymore. In April, the bill's author, Republican Rep. F. James Sensenbrenner Jr. of Wisconsin, floated what might be called the "Jail Janet Jackson" initiative.
NEWS
By Stephan Faris and Stephan Faris,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 11, 2002
KATSINA, Nigeria - The sign says you've arrived at the Luna Castle Hotel and Nite Club, but the discotheque is long gone. It closed in August 2000 when this northern Nigerian state introduced a hard-line Islamic criminal code. Bars were shut down, hotels burnt to the ground. Prostitutes and gamblers fled across the border to the Niger Republic. Lately, though, Muslim customers have been trickling back, says the Castle hotel proprietor, Hilary Okonkwo. There's a little dancing - musicians have turned a dry fountain into a stage in the hotel courtyard - and young men shoot pool nearby.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | November 6, 1992
MOSCOW -- Stung by criticism over the arrest of a chemist who exposed Russia's secret poison-gas research lab, the Security Ministry held a press conference yesterday to defend itself.The ministry -- still generally known here as the KGB -- invited reporters to its notorious Lubyanka headquarters, where officials said they have every right to protect state secrets and to uphold laws that are themselves secret.Insults have been heaped on the ministry over the case, said Yuri Demin, head of its legal department.
NEWS
By Gene Healy | June 17, 2005
WASHINGTON - Drug warriors in Congress are considering a bill that would send parents to jail for at least three years if they learn of drug activity near their children and fail to report it to authorities within 24 hours. One wonders if this a good idea, especially in areas such as Baltimore, where intimidation and murder of government witnesses are common. But when it comes to the criminal law, Congress rarely pauses for reflection anymore. In April, the bill's author, Republican Rep. F. James Sensenbrenner Jr. of Wisconsin, floated what might be called the "Jail Janet Jackson" initiative.
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN | April 22, 2009
The problem with plea bargains is not always that the guilty get breaks but that the best lawyerly arguments stay forever muffled. I was prepared Monday for one of those great debates, in the most unlikely of places: the halls of justice at the John R. Hargrove Sr. District Court building on Patapsco Avenue in Brooklyn. But the prosecutor and the big-name defense attorney made a deal, no matter that they disagreed completely on who would have prevailed at trial. That's how the case of Nicholas Foster, who became an object of vitriol when he was charged with forging a coveted parking pass for the car-clogged streets of South Baltimore's Otterbein and trying to sell it on Craigslist, ended with a perfunctory nod from Judge Charles A. Chiapparelli and both sides claiming victory.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 13, 2004
MOSCOW - In Russia's courts, even the laws of physics can sometimes be overridden. Attorney Stanislav Y. Markelov sat in Moscow City Court, listening as a defendant was charged with two drug deals made within minutes of each other in neighborhoods many miles apart. The defense attorney wondered if the judge was dozing, until he raised his head and marveled at the defendant's ability to be in two different places at nearly the same time. "How quick he is," the judge said. He let both charges stand, convicted the defendant and sentenced him to at least six years in prison.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | August 15, 2001
IT IS A set of those mixed messages adults are always giving children: The same week the state of Maryland suspended sales tax on back-to-school purchases, schools reiterated their dress codes in time for the start of classes. What are our kids hearing? "Clothing will be 5 percent cheaper for a week. Good luck finding anything legal to wear." Clothes shopping used to be a family affair: Mothers fought with their children up and down the malls of the United States over issues like price, quantity and modesty.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 13, 2004
MOSCOW - In Russia's courts, even the laws of physics can sometimes be overridden. Attorney Stanislav Y. Markelov sat in Moscow City Court, listening as a defendant was charged with two drug deals made within minutes of each other in neighborhoods many miles apart. The defense attorney wondered if the judge was dozing, until he raised his head and marveled at the defendant's ability to be in two different places at nearly the same time. "How quick he is," the judge said. He let both charges stand, convicted the defendant and sentenced him to at least six years in prison.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 27, 2004
SALT LAKE CITY - Many people see a philosophical or moral element in the debate about whether harming a fetus, through a violent act against its mother, should be a separate crime. In Washington, where the Senate sent a bill to President Bush on Thursday that would designate just such a new federal crime, the discussion often drifted toward the symbolic. In Utah and other states, though, where this debate has raged for months, if not years, people are moving on to the next phase: the nuts and bolts of what these laws mean.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2002
Authorities investigating a Maryland anti-crime agency overseen by Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend are evaluating whether criminal charges could be brought under a broadly drawn law designed to protect the vast sums of money distributed each year through federal programs, sources and legal experts said. The statute has been widely successful in public corruption cases in other states. It makes it illegal for an agent or employee of a local agency that receives U.S. dollars to use the money for any purpose other than for what it was intended.
NEWS
By Stephan Faris and Stephan Faris,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 11, 2002
KATSINA, Nigeria - The sign says you've arrived at the Luna Castle Hotel and Nite Club, but the discotheque is long gone. It closed in August 2000 when this northern Nigerian state introduced a hard-line Islamic criminal code. Bars were shut down, hotels burnt to the ground. Prostitutes and gamblers fled across the border to the Niger Republic. Lately, though, Muslim customers have been trickling back, says the Castle hotel proprietor, Hilary Okonkwo. There's a little dancing - musicians have turned a dry fountain into a stage in the hotel courtyard - and young men shoot pool nearby.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | August 15, 2001
IT IS A set of those mixed messages adults are always giving children: The same week the state of Maryland suspended sales tax on back-to-school purchases, schools reiterated their dress codes in time for the start of classes. What are our kids hearing? "Clothing will be 5 percent cheaper for a week. Good luck finding anything legal to wear." Clothes shopping used to be a family affair: Mothers fought with their children up and down the malls of the United States over issues like price, quantity and modesty.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2000
No matter how hard she shook him, Kim Angelozzi's 12-year-old son would not wake up for school. She knew why: The prescription drugs her son took to control his violent anger and depression made him dead to the world. She tried everything - even, at the school's suggestion, enticing him awake with popcorn. What she did not know was that his inability to get out of bed would land her in Howard County criminal court. Court summonses for truancy also came as a shock and outrage to other women, who say they are doing their best to handle their learning-disabled, troubled or out-of-control children along with their own problems, including homelessness.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2000
No matter how hard she shook him, Kim Angelozzi's 12-year-old son would not wake up for school. She knew why: The prescription drugs her son took to control his violent anger and depression made him dead to the world. She tried everything - even, at the school's suggestion, enticing him awake with popcorn. What she did not know was that his inability to get out of bed would land her in Howard County criminal court. Court summonses for truancy also came as a shock and outrage to other women, who say they are doing their best to handle their learning-disabled, troubled or out-of-control children along with their own problems, including homelessness.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 27, 2004
SALT LAKE CITY - Many people see a philosophical or moral element in the debate about whether harming a fetus, through a violent act against its mother, should be a separate crime. In Washington, where the Senate sent a bill to President Bush on Thursday that would designate just such a new federal crime, the discussion often drifted toward the symbolic. In Utah and other states, though, where this debate has raged for months, if not years, people are moving on to the next phase: the nuts and bolts of what these laws mean.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 19, 1993
MOSCOW -- Russian legislators, making a historic update to the Criminal Code, have revoked the law that let czars and Communists alike sentence many of Russia's illustrious sons and daughters -- from Fyodor Dostoevsky to Soviet-era dissidents -- to Siberian exile or banishment."
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Moscow Bureau | November 6, 1992
MOSCOW -- Stung by criticism over the arrest of a chemist who exposed Russia's secret poison-gas research lab, the Security Ministry held a press conference yesterday to defend itself.The ministry -- still generally known here as the KGB -- invited reporters to its notorious Lubyanka headquarters, where officials said they have every right to protect state secrets and to uphold laws that are themselves secret.Insults have been heaped on the ministry over the case, said Yuri Demin, head of its legal department.
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