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NEWS
September 11, 1998
WHAT is required to impeach the president of the United States? What terrible thing must he or she have done to put the nation to such trauma?The president, vice president and all civil officers of the United States, shall be removed from office on impeachment for, and conviction of, treason, bribery, or other high crimes and misdemeanors.-- U.S. ConstitutionLegal scholar Raoul Berger in his celebrated 1973 book, "Impeachment: The Constitutional Problems," addressed this. He said again and again, in varying vocabulary, that it must be a crime of magnitude against the state, against the community, that it need not be an indictable offense but it must be a "great offense."
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 28, 2005
JUST WHEN YOU MIGHT give up on young American film directors making art the way Bergman and Kurosawa did, along comes Bennett Miller's quiet, tumultuous Capote. It's a bleakly funny, profoundly unsettling depiction of Truman Capote as a young literary lion, or maybe an overgrown cub, on the scent of his Next Big Thing: a "non-fiction novel" about a Kansas murder. It begins as a deft high comedy about a cosmopolitan man of letters endearing himself to the boondocks. Then it expands into a heart-stabbing, dizzying examination of the exploitation that occurs in friendships, work relations, and the bond between a journalist and his subject.
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NEWS
By Theo Lippman Jr | April 12, 1998
Want to hear a really great impeachment story? O.K. But first let's answer a question that is on everyone's mind: What the expletive deleted) are high crimes and misdemeanors anyway?I ask because there are rumblings in Washington that Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr is preparing a report for Congress that will say President Clinton committed acts that "may constitute grounds for impeachment." The Constitution says, "The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office on Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors."
NEWS
February 11, 1999
THE CHARGES against President Clinton never added up to high crimes and misdemeanors as the Framers of the Constitution defined them.To pretend that they did would judge President Clinton by a standard to which no previous president has been held. It would weaken the presidency, making the hunt for impeachable scandal the great political game in coming decades.The impeachment trial managers did not prove President Clinton guilty even of low crimes and misdemeanors. Instead, they counted on senators' willingness to convict on suggestibility and inference.
NEWS
February 11, 1999
THE CHARGES against President Clinton never added up to high crimes and misdemeanors as the Framers of the Constitution defined them.To pretend that they did would judge President Clinton by a standard to which no previous president has been held. It would weaken the presidency, making the hunt for impeachable scandal the great political game in coming decades.The impeachment trial managers did not prove President Clinton guilty even of low crimes and misdemeanors. Instead, they counted on senators' willingness to convict on suggestibility and inference.
NEWS
October 6, 1998
THE PARTISAN drive in the House Judiciary Committee to inquire into possible impeachment of President Clinton is billed by some as payback for Watergate.So it is, in a partisan sense. But this inquiry is no Watergate.Crimes against President Nixon's critics and election opponents were behind Watergate. It dealt with presidential corruption of federal agencies to achieve that purpose. Conduct involved undermined the Constitution -- what its framers meant by "high crimes and misdemeanors."Those are, in the words of Alexander Hamilton, "injuries done immediately to the society itself."
NEWS
December 20, 1998
THE HOUSE of Representatives has taken a profound step toward weakening U.S. institutions, the presidency and democracy.As a call to remove the president from office, impeachment seeks to nullify the informed decision of the voters. It plunges the Senate into a trial. As a result, the normal operation of government will grind to a halt; vital issues will be left unaddressed.Impeachment is a solemn and necessary power provided to the House of Representatives. It is the nation's ultimate remedy for the tendency of power to corrupt and for the holders to use power to usurp more.
NEWS
September 12, 1998
KENNETH Starr's much-anticipated report tells, with more salacious detail, what the American people already knew. It confirms that the leaks were accurate while many of the rumors were not. The nation is embarrassed, President Clinton is diminished. But at first reading, the test of impeachable crimes is not met.The massive dissemination of this report is the greatest exercise in history of mass prurience, character assassination, participatory democracy and lawmakers' sincere quest for guidance -- all in one. This newspaper is disgusted, proud and excited -- all at once -- to be part of it. At bottom, there is no doubt about our role.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | November 27, 1990
That Bill Moyers once trained to be a Southern Baptist minister is evident in tonight's ''Frontline,'' "High Crimes and Misdemeanors," a detailed and illuminating re-examination of the Iran-contra affair.In the 90-minute documentary, which will be on Maryland Public Television, channels 22 and 67, at 9 o'clock, Moyers traces the scandal back to the twin roots that nourished the tree which produced this bitter fruit.There were the American hostages in captivity in the Mideast and President Reagan promising their families that something would be done to win their freedom.
TOPIC
By Articles by Jason J. Vicente | January 24, 1999
UNFORTUNATELY, the paucity of debate among the Framers over the nature of an impeachable offense leaves us with little guidance as to what might be considered grounds for impeachment. Looking elsewhere, we find two possible sources of guidance: England, and the colonial experience.In February 1974, the House of Representatives' Committee on the Judiciary published a report by the Staff of Impeachment Inquiry titled "Constitutional Grounds for Presidential Impeachment." To better understand the Framers' intent, the Inquiry examined the history of impeachment in England, noting Alexander Hamilton's statement that "Great Britain had served as the model from which [impeachment]
TOPIC
By Articles by Jason J. Vicente | January 24, 1999
UNFORTUNATELY, the paucity of debate among the Framers over the nature of an impeachable offense leaves us with little guidance as to what might be considered grounds for impeachment. Looking elsewhere, we find two possible sources of guidance: England, and the colonial experience.In February 1974, the House of Representatives' Committee on the Judiciary published a report by the Staff of Impeachment Inquiry titled "Constitutional Grounds for Presidential Impeachment." To better understand the Framers' intent, the Inquiry examined the history of impeachment in England, noting Alexander Hamilton's statement that "Great Britain had served as the model from which [impeachment]
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 14, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski said yesterday that she might not vote to unseat President Clinton even if the allegations against him are proved "beyond a shadow of a doubt."If they are proved during his Senate trial, only then will the Maryland Democrat decide whether they amount to the "high crimes and misdemeanors" that the Constitution requires to remove a president.Some Republican senators have declared that the charges of perjury and obstruction of justice against Clinton, if proved, warrant his conviction, which would trigger his removal from office.
NEWS
December 20, 1998
Senate trial gives Clinton a chance to expose real scandalIt is really too bad that at a time so many perceive the Republican Party as being under complete control of the most fanatical elements of the religious right that moderate members of the House of Representatives have demonstrated such an appalling lack of courage.One has to wonder just how the right wing has gotten to them.One way to find out is by letting the process go forward. The few who so rabidly favor trying to remove the president from office do not seem to realize that in a trial before the Senate, the president would at last have the opportunity to defend himself -- something that has yet to occur.
NEWS
December 20, 1998
THE HOUSE of Representatives has taken a profound step toward weakening U.S. institutions, the presidency and democracy.As a call to remove the president from office, impeachment seeks to nullify the informed decision of the voters. It plunges the Senate into a trial. As a result, the normal operation of government will grind to a halt; vital issues will be left unaddressed.Impeachment is a solemn and necessary power provided to the House of Representatives. It is the nation's ultimate remedy for the tendency of power to corrupt and for the holders to use power to usurp more.
NEWS
December 16, 1998
MEMBERS of the House of Representatives are asked to impeach the president, seeking his removal and disqualification from office, for actions never impeachable in the past.The alleged crime is scandalous behavior that previous presidents have committed and evasion of a legal witch hunt to which none of them was subjected.This serious business cannot be sloughed off as merely an act of disapproval, in the faith that the Senate will not convict. The only aims of impeachment are removal and disqualification from office.
FEATURES
By Lars-Erik Nelson and Lars-Erik Nelson,Special to the sun | October 18, 1998
"Impeachment: A Handbook," by Charles L. Black, Jr. Yale University Press. 80 pages. $6.95.Suppose the president, desirous of having four wives, moves to Saudi Arabia and proposes to run his administration from afar, by telephone. It is not a crime, exactly, but it would certainly be an impeachable offense. Suppose, on the other hand, a president transports a woman across a state line for immoral purposes or conceals a young aide's possession of marijuana. These are indeed crimes, but hardly worthy of impeachment.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 14, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski said yesterday that she might not vote to unseat President Clinton even if the allegations against him are proved "beyond a shadow of a doubt."If they are proved during his Senate trial, only then will the Maryland Democrat decide whether they amount to the "high crimes and misdemeanors" that the Constitution requires to remove a president.Some Republican senators have declared that the charges of perjury and obstruction of justice against Clinton, if proved, warrant his conviction, which would trigger his removal from office.
NEWS
December 16, 1998
MEMBERS of the House of Representatives are asked to impeach the president, seeking his removal and disqualification from office, for actions never impeachable in the past.The alleged crime is scandalous behavior that previous presidents have committed and evasion of a legal witch hunt to which none of them was subjected.This serious business cannot be sloughed off as merely an act of disapproval, in the faith that the Senate will not convict. The only aims of impeachment are removal and disqualification from office.
NEWS
October 6, 1998
THE PARTISAN drive in the House Judiciary Committee to inquire into possible impeachment of President Clinton is billed by some as payback for Watergate.So it is, in a partisan sense. But this inquiry is no Watergate.Crimes against President Nixon's critics and election opponents were behind Watergate. It dealt with presidential corruption of federal agencies to achieve that purpose. Conduct involved undermined the Constitution -- what its framers meant by "high crimes and misdemeanors."Those are, in the words of Alexander Hamilton, "injuries done immediately to the society itself."
NEWS
September 12, 1998
KENNETH Starr's much-anticipated report tells, with more salacious detail, what the American people already knew. It confirms that the leaks were accurate while many of the rumors were not. The nation is embarrassed, President Clinton is diminished. But at first reading, the test of impeachable crimes is not met.The massive dissemination of this report is the greatest exercise in history of mass prurience, character assassination, participatory democracy and lawmakers' sincere quest for guidance -- all in one. This newspaper is disgusted, proud and excited -- all at once -- to be part of it. At bottom, there is no doubt about our role.
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