Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCrimes Against Humanity
IN THE NEWS

Crimes Against Humanity

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 8, 1998
JEAN-PAUL Akayesu was neither the biggest nor smallest fish in the Hutu genocide machine that tried to wipe out Rwandan Tutsis in 1994.A mayor caught up in the madness of superiors, he was found guilty by three judges after an international tribunal's trial lasting from Jan. 9, 1997, to Sept. 2, 1998. He is guilty on nine counts of genocide, crimes against humanity, rape, murder and torture. The 300-page judgment links him to the deaths of 2,000 people.Jean-Paul Akayesu has made history. He is the first person convicted of genocide, a half-century after the world ratified that as a crime to be judged and punished.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 3, 2011
The Syrian government's increasingly brutal crackdown on peaceful protesters is putting the Obama administration's revamped Middle East policy to its first real test. It's one thing to say U.S. policy toward the region should spring from America's core values of democracy, freedom and support for human rights, but it's quite another to put those ideals into practice in the real world. In his speech last month about the upheaval sweeping Arab countries, Mr. Obama conceded that in the past America's short-term interests in maintaining regional stability had often trumped its commitment to democratic reform.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Maggie Farley and Maggie Farley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 29, 2005
UNITED NATIONS - A U.N. commission on Sudan has concluded that systematic, government-backed violence in the western region of Darfur was not genocide but that there was evidence of crimes against humanity with an ethnic dimension. The report documents violations of international human rights law, incidents of war crimes by militias and the rebels fighting them, and names individuals who may have acted with a "genocidal intention." But there was not sufficient evidence to indicate that the Khartoum government had a state policy intended to exterminate a particular racial or ethnic group, according to diplomats familiar with the report.
NEWS
By Stewart Patrick | May 15, 2008
For nearly two weeks, we have witnessed the callous indifference of Myanmar's ruling junta to the victims of Cyclone Nargis. The regime's grotesque failure to permit more than a trickle of aid has stimulated calls for the United Nations to compel Myanmar to provide access for international relief efforts. Whether such calls are answered could determine the survival of hundreds of thousands in Myanmar spared from the initial inundation but clinging to life without food, clean water, shelter and access to lifesaving medicines.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 20, 1994
VERSAILLES, France -- Almost 50 years after he ordered the execution of seven Jews while he was serving in a pro-Nazi militia, Paul Touvier yesterday became the first Frenchman to be found guilty of crimes against humanity during World War II.Now a frail 79-year-old suffering from prostate cancer, Touvier was sentenced to life imprisonment.Touvier never denied sending the seven Jews to their deaths on June 29, 1944, at Rillieux-la-Pape, near Lyon. But he said he did so to save 23 others. Given the last word before the jury withdrew, he said: "I have never forgotten the victims of Rillieux.
NEWS
July 6, 2001
SLOBODAN Milosevic's contemptuous defiance of the United Nations tribunal at his arraignment for crimes against humanity was effective theater. It will play well with some Serbs back home, notably Yugoslav President Vojislav Kostunica, who echoed him. It will find sympathy from some American apologists for his policies and critics of the NATO bombing of Serbia. Mr. Milosevic claims that the tribunal has no legitimacy and that its only purpose is to justify the war crime of NATO bombing.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 15, 1998
ROME -- In one of the most ambitious efforts ever undertaken to extend the rule of international law, the United Nations will open a conference here today to hash out rules for an international court to prosecute crimes against humanity.The United Nations envisions a kind of global Nuremberg -- a permanent court where individuals accused of atrocities and genocide can be tried and punished. But even before legal experts and delegates from 156 countries begin debating the fine points at the monthlong conference, the most basic issues of jurisdiction and accountability remain deeply contested.
NEWS
June 25, 1998
AFTER two years of drafting a 173-page statute on crimes against humanity, a United Nations conference is struggling to find consensus on setting up a so-called "war crimes" court.Never was the need so clear.Instead of creating separate courts, such as those in Nuremberg after World War II or in Rwanda or the former Yugoslavia today, U.N. countries would form a permanent court to try those accused of such crimes as genocide and ethnic cleansing. The hope is that clear laws and a forum to enforce them would deter the next potential butcher.
NEWS
April 4, 2001
INCARCERATION of the sadistic dictator Slobodan Milosevic is a major step toward Serbia's reintegration into the community of nations. It is also not enough. The Yugoslav government of democratically elected President Vojislav Kostunica deserves credit for making the arrest and for waiting out a confrontation with armed and drunken bodyguards long enough to avoid threatened bloodshed. It was done just in time to bring a favorable decision by the United States to continue its modest $50 million in bilateral aid and to support Yugoslavia's loan requests to international lending agencies.
NEWS
By Susannah Patton and Susannah Patton,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 3, 1997
PARIS -- In 1942, when he was 17, Michel Slitinsky fled the French police, who were searching for Jews in the city of Bordeaux. He escaped by hiding on rooftops, but his father and other Jews there were less fortunate: They were captured, deported and died in German concentration camps.Slitinsky ever since has sought to find and bring to justice the person he believed responsible for his father's death. After a 15-year legal battle, Slitinsky and 49 other families of Holocaust victims are about to encounter him in court.
NEWS
February 18, 2008
GERMAN CHUPINA, 86 Wanted for crimes against humanity German Chupina, a former Guatemalan police director wanted in Spain for crimes against humanity, died yesterday. He was 86. Mr. Chupina suffered from Alzheimer's disease, liver and renal problems, and fractures caused by old age, his son German Armando Chupina said. His father, police director from 1978 to 1982, was arrested in November 2006 after Guatemalan Nobel Peace Laureate Rigoberta Menchu levied charges of genocide, torture and state terror in a Spanish court against him and seven other former military and government officials.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 3, 2007
UNITED NATIONS -- The International Criminal Court issued its first arrest warrants yesterday for a Sudanese government minister and a former militia leader accused of war crimes in Sudan's western Darfur region. Sudanese officials, however, said they would not hand over the accused pair, who were charged with dozens of counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity.
NEWS
By Alexandra Zavis and Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Alexandra Zavis and Molly Hennessy-Fiske,Los Angeles Times | December 28, 2006
BAGHDAD -- Saddam Hussein declared in a handwritten farewell letter published yesterday that his execution for crimes against humanity would be a sacrifice for his people, and he urged Iraqis not to give in to hatred. "Here I am presenting myself as a sacrifice, if God wants this," wrote the former Iraqi president. "I invite you now to reject hatred, since hatred will not allow justice and fairness. I also invite you, brothers and sisters, my sons and Iraq's sons, strugglers, comrades not to hate the nations that assaulted us."
NEWS
By John Rodden and Michael D. Kerlin | December 27, 2006
The death this month of Augusto Pinochet, the former Chilean dictator whose secret police killed and tortured thousands of dissidents, helped seal 2006 as the most fateful year for war criminals and other human rights violators since the Nuremberg trials of 1946. But, at the same time, the docket of human-rights crimes is growing larger and more ill-defined than ever. Just as the nature of human rights violations is evolving, so must the international community's response. The International Criminal Court at The Hague will need extra resources to handle all of its cases and adjudicate the messier ones.
NEWS
By Borzou Daragahi and Borzou Daragahi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 7, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Saddam Hussein, the former Iraqi leader convicted of crimes against humanity, could face the hangman in four or five months inside the notorious Abu Ghraib prison where he sent many of his victims, the lead prosecutor in his case and a top Iraqi legal expert said yesterday. Chief prosecutor Jaafar al-Mousawi, who dueled with Hussein during 11 months of grueling courtroom confrontations, estimated that the Iraqi High Tribunal's nine-judge appellate panel would complete its review in about two months.
NEWS
By Aamer Madhani and Aamer Madhani,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 6, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Lawyers with the Iraqi Special Tribunal will likely center their case against Saddam Hussein on 12 charges of crimes against humanity selected from up to 500 cases that they could bring against the deposed leader, an Iraqi government spokesman said yesterday. The lawyers will be focusing on 12 charges as a matter of expediency, said Laith Kuba, an Iraqi government spokesman. Even before the capture of Hussein in December 2003, tribunal lawyers were gathering evidence against Hussein and other high-ranking Baath Party loyalists.
NEWS
By DAN FESPERMAN and DAN FESPERMAN,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 31, 1996
THE HAGUE, The Netherlands -- Between them, they have taken aim at some of America's most notorious criminal targets in recent memory. One prosecuted Exxon for its Alaska oil spill. Another helped convict the Los Angeles policemen who beat up Rodney King. Still others have hunted down murderers, Mafia bosses, drug lords and fugitive Nazis.Now they're here, some 40 American lawyers and investigators in all, and they're working the biggest case of their lives.Their employer is the International War Crimes Tribunal, established in 1994.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 28, 1999
THE HAGUE, Netherlands -- The International War Crimes Tribunal issued an arrest warrant yesterday for President Slobodan Milosevic, charging him and other senior Yugoslav officials with crimes against humanity in Kosovo, including the murder, forced deportation and persecution of ethnic Albanians.The charges -- including the forced deportation of 740,000 ethnic Albanians from Kosovo this year and the murder of more than 340 identified Albanians -- in effect branded the Yugoslav government as a criminal regime.
NEWS
By Maggie Farley and Maggie Farley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 29, 2005
UNITED NATIONS - A U.N. commission on Sudan has concluded that systematic, government-backed violence in the western region of Darfur was not genocide but that there was evidence of crimes against humanity with an ethnic dimension. The report documents violations of international human rights law, incidents of war crimes by militias and the rebels fighting them, and names individuals who may have acted with a "genocidal intention." But there was not sufficient evidence to indicate that the Khartoum government had a state policy intended to exterminate a particular racial or ethnic group, according to diplomats familiar with the report.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 26, 2003
BOMBAY, India - Two powerful bombs concealed in parked taxis exploded yesterday in the heart of Bombay, India's commercial capital, killing 45 people and wounding at least 135. The blasts occurred minutes apart, the first in a packed shopping district, the second next to the city's favorite gathering place, the Gateway of India, a colonial relic whose massive arch has become an indelible image of this metropolis. No group or individual had claimed responsibility for the blasts as of late afternoon, and it was unclear how the bombs were detonated.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.