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March 28, 1996
Day in history: March 28In 1797, Nathaniel Briggs of New Hampshire patented a washing machine.In 1834, the U.S. Senate voted to censure President Jackson for the removal of federal deposits from the Bank of the United States.In 1854, during the Crimean War, Britain and France declared war on Russia.In 1896, the opera "Andrea Chenier," by Umberto Giordano premiered in Milan, Italy.In 1930, the names of the Turkish cities of Constantinople and Angora were changed to Istanbul and Ankara.In 1939, the Spanish Civil War ended as Madrid fell to the forces of Francisco Franco.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Harry Merritt and Harry Merritt,Sun Staff | November 14, 2004
If wet noses, wagging tails, rousing barks and tireless chasing of the ball are among your life's delights, you'll want to see A Thousand Hounds: A Walk with the Dogs Through the History of Photography. But the show, on display at the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, isn't just for dog lovers. It's an effortless and pleasant way to learn just how far photography has come in the last century and a half. A Thousand Hounds, organized by the Cygnet Foundation in New York, is based in part on the book A Thousand Hounds, published in 2000.
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NEWS
By Norrie Epstein | August 22, 1993
WHAT JANE AUSTEN ATEAND DICKENS KNEW: FROMFOX HUNTING TO WHIST --THE FACTS OF DAILY LIFE INNINETEENTH-CENTURYENGLANDDaniel PoolSimon & Schuster416 pages. $25To truly understand the 19th-century English novel, you don't need semiotics, deconstructionism or even any critical approach. What you need is a working knowledge of pounds and pence, the class system, dowries, primogeniture, church politics, weddings and wills. If this sounds like a Lewis Caroll nonsense list, it should. The 19th-century novel, more than any other genre in any other period, is an omnium gatherum of life as it was lived by its readers.
NEWS
By Johanna Neuman and Johanna Neuman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 5, 2003
WASHINGTON - Charles Collingwood was broadcasting on live radio from Normandy, one of the correspondents assigned to cover World War II for the famed CBS broadcaster Edward R. Murrow. U.S. troops were landing on Omaha Beach, and Collingwood had 15 minutes of live air time. His view blocked, his chatter running out, Collingwood - according to journalist Dan Schorr - turned to a man in uniform. Thrusting a live microphone in his face, the CBS correspondent asked the admiral how things were going in the D-Day operation.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 11, 1996
TC Elizabeth Egloff had been living with Elena Nikolayevna Stahov and Dmitri Insarov for nearly two years before she made them the centerpiece of her play "The Lover."Inspired by these central characters in Ivan Turgenev's 1859 novel "On the Eve," Egloff's play will receive its world premiere at Center Stage beginning Friday.Elena and Dmitri came into Egloff's life in 1994 when the feature film division of PBS' "American Playhouse" series hired her to write a screenplay based on a novel by William Trevor called "Reading Turgenev."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Harry Merritt and Harry Merritt,Sun Staff | November 14, 2004
If wet noses, wagging tails, rousing barks and tireless chasing of the ball are among your life's delights, you'll want to see A Thousand Hounds: A Walk with the Dogs Through the History of Photography. But the show, on display at the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, isn't just for dog lovers. It's an effortless and pleasant way to learn just how far photography has come in the last century and a half. A Thousand Hounds, organized by the Cygnet Foundation in New York, is based in part on the book A Thousand Hounds, published in 2000.
NEWS
By Harry G. Summers | February 8, 1991
TAKE HIM out and shoot him," roared Gen. Dreedle about a briefing officer who told him things he did not want to hear in "Catch 22," Joseph Heller's satirical novel about Army Air Corps operations in Italy in World War II.In more recent wars, that scene often could have served as a caricature of military attitudes toward the media. Like all caricatures, it was overdrawn. But as a member of a 1985 Twentieth Century Fund task force on the military and the media following the 1983 invasion of Grenada, I found there was too much truth in it for comfort.
NEWS
By Johanna Neuman and Johanna Neuman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 5, 2003
WASHINGTON - Charles Collingwood was broadcasting on live radio from Normandy, one of the correspondents assigned to cover World War II for the famed CBS broadcaster Edward R. Murrow. U.S. troops were landing on Omaha Beach, and Collingwood had 15 minutes of live air time. His view blocked, his chatter running out, Collingwood - according to journalist Dan Schorr - turned to a man in uniform. Thrusting a live microphone in his face, the CBS correspondent asked the admiral how things were going in the D-Day operation.
FEATURES
By The Literary Almanac | July 26, 1998
Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910)was born in Yasnaya Polyana, Russia, into an aristocratic family. Orphaned at 9, he was brought up by an elderly aunt and studied at Kazan University, but did not graduate. After several aimless years in town and countryside, Tolstoy served as an officer in the Caucasus, wrote his first novels, and after the Crimean War retired as commander. He returned to St. Petersburg a literary star, traveled abroad and married Sophie Behrs in 1862. They had 13 children. He is best remembered for some of the most important fiction ever written - "War and Peace" (1869)
NEWS
April 29, 2014
As a passionate aerospace buff and American taxpayer, I'm discouraged a man of Capt. Gregory McWherter's talent, training and expertise would be relieved of his Blue Angels command based on allegations of a "nasty work environment. " I've read Susan Reimer 's account ( "Where are all the heroes?" April 28) and searched the Internet for what exactly Captain McWherter said or did, and I could find nothing. The word "allegation" is everywhere, yet there's no mention of the person or persons who filed these sexual harassment complaints.
FEATURES
March 28, 1996
Day in history: March 28In 1797, Nathaniel Briggs of New Hampshire patented a washing machine.In 1834, the U.S. Senate voted to censure President Jackson for the removal of federal deposits from the Bank of the United States.In 1854, during the Crimean War, Britain and France declared war on Russia.In 1896, the opera "Andrea Chenier," by Umberto Giordano premiered in Milan, Italy.In 1930, the names of the Turkish cities of Constantinople and Angora were changed to Istanbul and Ankara.In 1939, the Spanish Civil War ended as Madrid fell to the forces of Francisco Franco.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 11, 1996
TC Elizabeth Egloff had been living with Elena Nikolayevna Stahov and Dmitri Insarov for nearly two years before she made them the centerpiece of her play "The Lover."Inspired by these central characters in Ivan Turgenev's 1859 novel "On the Eve," Egloff's play will receive its world premiere at Center Stage beginning Friday.Elena and Dmitri came into Egloff's life in 1994 when the feature film division of PBS' "American Playhouse" series hired her to write a screenplay based on a novel by William Trevor called "Reading Turgenev."
NEWS
By Norrie Epstein | August 22, 1993
WHAT JANE AUSTEN ATEAND DICKENS KNEW: FROMFOX HUNTING TO WHIST --THE FACTS OF DAILY LIFE INNINETEENTH-CENTURYENGLANDDaniel PoolSimon & Schuster416 pages. $25To truly understand the 19th-century English novel, you don't need semiotics, deconstructionism or even any critical approach. What you need is a working knowledge of pounds and pence, the class system, dowries, primogeniture, church politics, weddings and wills. If this sounds like a Lewis Caroll nonsense list, it should. The 19th-century novel, more than any other genre in any other period, is an omnium gatherum of life as it was lived by its readers.
NEWS
By Harry G. Summers | February 8, 1991
TAKE HIM out and shoot him," roared Gen. Dreedle about a briefing officer who told him things he did not want to hear in "Catch 22," Joseph Heller's satirical novel about Army Air Corps operations in Italy in World War II.In more recent wars, that scene often could have served as a caricature of military attitudes toward the media. Like all caricatures, it was overdrawn. But as a member of a 1985 Twentieth Century Fund task force on the military and the media following the 1983 invasion of Grenada, I found there was too much truth in it for comfort.
NEWS
March 15, 2007
British newspaper readers were appalled when The Times reported that no preparations had been made by the army to deal with wounded soldiers. That was in 1854, during the Crimean War against Russia. A century and a half later, newspaper readers are still being appalled by the state of military medicine. But what sets the Walter Reed scandal apart from the Crimean experience (which inspired the legendary nurse Florence Nightingale to take matters into her own capable hands) is that four years have passed since the war in Iraq began.
NEWS
By Arnold Blumberg and Arnold Blumberg,Special to The Sun | April 9, 1995
"Jericho: Dreams, Ruins, Phantoms," by Robert Ruby. 340 pages. New York: Henry Holt and Company. $25 Anyone interested in the history of Palestine/Israel will find this book gripping. It has the tone of a mystery story, making frequent reference to a mound of earth in Jericho, which hides the origins of that ancient city. However, if you await a dramatic denouement to the story, you will be disappointed.The author was The Baltimore Sun's bureau chief in Jerusalem, l987-1992. His residence in Jericho made him choose that town as his subject.
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