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NEWS
March 6, 2014
In 1938, Adolph Hitler wanted to annex that portion of Czechoslovakia that bordered on Germany known as the Sudetenland which had a large German ethnic minority but which, much more importantly, contained the extremely strong border defenses of the Czech Army. Hitler infiltrated Nazi agitators into the Sudetenland who created conditions wherein Hitler could claim he had to militarily occupy that portion of Czechoslovakia in order to protect ethnic Germans. Hitler then met with Italy's Benito Mussolini and British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain at Munich and promised in writing that if they would concur in this annexation he, Hitler, had no more territorial ambitions in Europe.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 8, 2014
As the crystal ball on the 2016 Republican presidential nomination remains cloudy, two-time loser Mitt Romney appears willing at least to entertain the possibility of trying a third time. In addition to occasional comments on matters he knows a lot about, including setting up a health care insurance plan (in Massachusetts) and how to create jobs as well as personal wealth, Mr. Romney has now put on a hat as a defense and foreign policy expert. It's a weapon in his arsenal that he conspicuously lacked in 2012, when he made a mid-campaign trip to Europe and succeeded chiefly ruffling local feathers in Britain, Israel and Poland.
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NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 10, 1994
CHATAL-KAYA, Ukraine -- The wariest people in the Crimea are the Tatars, unlucky in war and even more unlucky in peace.Persecuted, vilified, jailed and deported under the old Soviet regime, the Tatars had only just started to rebuild their communities here in their ancestral homeland when they found themselves face-to-face with a new, post-Soviet brand of Russian nationalism.The Russians, who make up 70 percent of the Crimea's population, are being stirred up by anti-Ukrainian feeling at the moment, but the Tatars here understandably fear that they themselves could get steamrollered if they are not careful.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 2, 2014
In keeping with his determination to get America off "a perpetual wartime footing" after more than a decade of combat in Iraq and Afghanistan, President Obama's commencement address at West Point was a sobering preview of what lies ahead for the graduates. Before an audience of the newly minted military officers, he sought at length to make the case for a selective response to global and regional challenges. He argued that this country must make hard choices about when and where the nation's might can be exerted as the leading partner in the world community.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | March 8, 2014
The Obama administration is showing it can be tough on foreign policy. Unfortunately, that toughness is not directed at Russia and its incursion into Crimea, but at Israel, America's ally. In an interview with President Obama, prior to the Washington arrival of Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu, Jeffrey Goldberg of Bloomberg.com writes that the president planned to tell Mr. Netanyahu "that his country could face a bleak future -- one of international isolation and demographic disaster -- if he refuses to endorse a U.S.-drafted framework agreement for peace with the Palestinians.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Yurgealitis | September 22, 2005
FUNKATRONIC AT THE 8X10 The lowdown -- Federal Hill's 8x10 Club will host "funkatronic" favorites Particle tonight with guest Gabby La La. The show is part of Particle's 32-stop "Calilicious" tour, culminating in a five-year anniversary show in Los Angeles. If you go -- Particle is at the 8x10 Club, 8-10 E. Cross St., tonight at 8. Show is 18 and over, and tickets are $14. Call 410-625-2000 or go to eightby tenclub.com. MADE IN JAPAN The lowdown -- Hailed as "Japan's premier synth punks" by Alternative Press, Polysics bring their uniforms and unpredictable live show to the Talking Head Club Wednesday at 9:30 p.m. Known for their unique sound and lyrics combining English, Japanese and their own "space language," Polysics' influences come from Japan but also such bands as Devo and the Ramones.
NEWS
April 2, 2014
Regarding James Rosapepe's recent commentary ( "The Romanians were (partly) right ," March 28), I want to add some additional information. For Romania to criticize the Russian seizure of Crimea is like the pot calling the kettle black. Romania had its own expansionistic policy, they just have a convenient amnesia. In 1920, Romania received Transylvania, a part of Hungary for a 1,000 years, in the Treaty of Trianon. Not satisfied, the Romanian Army moved past the demarcation line into the truncated Hungary, trying unsuccessfully to gain further territory.
NEWS
March 24, 2014
Western governments and specifically the Obama administration have been laughably naive about Russian President Vladimir Putin's reactions and intentions in Crimea and the Ukraine ( "Obama must take stronger measures to confront Putin," March 20). Mr. Putin's empire-building aspirations have now become transparent to the world. A dictator with an occasional perfunctory nod toward reform, one who grew up and came to power in the KGB during the Cold War, he has been unmoved by sanctions and diplomacy.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 22, 1994
ODESSA, Ukraine -- If the potent forces of frustrated nationalism, economic distress and political division continue unchecked in Ukraine, what happened here April 10 could someday be remembered as the Fort Sumter of the Black Sea War.Late that day, Ukrainian airborne commandos stormed the small Russian-controlled navy base here, ousted Russian officers' families from their homes at gunpoint, ransacked their apartments and took control of the base....
NEWS
By Steve Phillips | March 20, 2014
President Barack Obama came into office promising to limit United States commitments abroad in order to focus on the economy and health care at home. Such an approach may have been prudent immediately after the excesses of the Bush administration, but strong measures are needed now to confront the crisis in Ukraine. During the past few weeks, political instability in Ukraine led to the resignation and flight of the pro-Russian president. Russia responded by invading part of Ukraine, Crimea, then engineering a vote for independence in that region.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2014
As Russia's actions in Ukraine rattle its neighbors, the Maryland National Guard is affirming its decades-long partnership with Estonia. Maryland has helped to train Estonian troops since shortly after the breakup of the Soviet Union. Now it's preparing to send A-10 pilots and liaison officers to Saber Strike, an annual U.S.-led security exercise that focuses on Estonia and its Baltic neighbors Latvia and Lithuania. The commander of the Maryland Guard traveled to Estonia last week for meetings with Northern European defense ministers and U.S. military leaders.
NEWS
By David W. Wise | May 27, 2014
This year marks the passage of one century since of the start of the First World War. It is the year that will mark the 75th anniversary of the Nazi invasion of Poland, which launched the Second World War. It is also the year that will mark a quarter of a century since the fall of the Berlin Wall. The two world wars were catastrophic events in which Europe, motivated by parochial interests and fears, divided up against itself and unleashed the greatest violence ever known in history, resulting in the deaths of 76 million.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | May 21, 2014
Sen. Ben Cardin will join a congressional delegation headed to Ukraine this weekend to monitor the country's presidential election, which is taking place amid that country's tense standoff with Russia. The Maryland Democrat and member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee will join Sen. Rob Portman, an Ohio Republican, and other lawmakers taking part in an international effort to ensure voters are allowed to choose the country's new leader without intimidation. "We're there to support the Ukrainians -- that's the message we'll carry with our physical presence," said Cardin.
NEWS
By Kathleen J. Smith | May 1, 2014
Russia annexed Ukraine's southern Crimea region, despite the fact that a significant minority of the Crimean population are not ethnically Russian nor interested in joining the Russian Federation. Approximately 12 percent of the Crimean population - over 250,000 people - are ethnically "Tatar," a largely pro-Ukrainian, Sunni Muslim group. They have an embattled history with Russia. In 1944, Stalin exiled the Tatar population to Central Asia, and over half of the population died in the forced migration.
NEWS
By Jon Shifrin | April 22, 2014
Some things are binary. They either are or they aren't. You can't be sort of pregnant or partially certifiable; it's one or the other - like being a Yankees or a Red Sox fan. Yet when it comes to international affairs, little is so cut-and-dried. Right and wrong are measured in degrees, and all high-minded principles are compromised. This is not necessarily evident during moments of global tension, though. On such occasions, which typically feature competing claims by antagonists with long standing historical grievances, complexity is swept aside, replaced by simplistic, easy-to-digest narratives of victim versus victimizer, virtue versus villainy.
NEWS
April 16, 2014
With Russian troops amassed along its border and Kremlin-backed separatists in control of major cities in eastern Ukraine, the government in Kiev is facing the gravest threat to its survival since the breakup of the former Soviet Union a generation ago. Unless the U.S. and its allies can convince Russian President Vladimir Putin to step back from using the unrest there as a pretext for military intervention, it looks more likely than ever that eastern...
NEWS
April 9, 2014
The new Ukrainian government in Kiev is under mounting pressure to keep the country from unraveling as pro-Russian demonstrators in Kharkiv, Donetsk, Lugansk and other eastern cities occupy government buildings and demand to be reunited with Moscow. Whether or not this is prelude to a replay of Russia's lightning takeover of the Crimea last month, President Barack Obama and European leaders must make absolutely clear to Russian President Vladimir Putin that his country will pay a heavy price for any attempt to change the map of Europe again by force.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | March 17, 2014
In American domestic politics, messing with Social Security is known as "the third rail," referring to the power source for trains that is fatal to the touch. In foreign policy discussions, invoking the name of Adolf Hitler promises the same lethal result. Former first lady and secretary of state Hillary Clinton learned the lesson in the wake of Russia's invasion of Crimea and parts of Ukraine. She caught hell from critics when she compared it to Hitler's 1938 seizure of the heavily German Sudetenland in Czechoslovakia under Neville Chamberlain's notorious pact with the devil in Munich.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 11, 2014
The report that protesters have declared two eastern Ukraine cities to be independent republics questions President Obama's assurance that there is no "military solution" to the crisis that began with Russian President Vladmir Putin's land grab of Crimea. "If Russia moves into eastern Ukraine, either overtly or covertly," White House press secretary Jay Carney said Monday, "this would be a very serious escalation. " But what does that mean? A State Department spokesperson said only that such a move "would result in additional costs" to Moscow.
NEWS
April 9, 2014
The new Ukrainian government in Kiev is under mounting pressure to keep the country from unraveling as pro-Russian demonstrators in Kharkiv, Donetsk, Lugansk and other eastern cities occupy government buildings and demand to be reunited with Moscow. Whether or not this is prelude to a replay of Russia's lightning takeover of the Crimea last month, President Barack Obama and European leaders must make absolutely clear to Russian President Vladimir Putin that his country will pay a heavy price for any attempt to change the map of Europe again by force.
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